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297 records – page 1 of 30.

[10 years of experiences with HIV and AIDS care. A report from a dermato-venereological clinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7846
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Nov 8;92(45):4172-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-8-1995
Author
I M Bergbrant
C. HÃ¥kansson
G B Löwhagen
E. Voog
Author Affiliation
Divisionen för hud- och könssjukvård, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Nov 8;92(45):4172-4
Date
Nov-8-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Dermatology
Evaluation Studies
HIV Infections - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Hospital Departments
Hospital Units
Humans
Sweden
Venereology
PubMed ID
7475537 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to health care and geographic mobility of HIV/AIDS patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213684
Source
AIDS Patient Care. 1995 Dec;9(6):297-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
R S Hogg
M T Schechter
A. Schilder
R. Le
S A Strathdee
I L Goldstone
M V O'Shaughnessy
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital/University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
AIDS Patient Care. 1995 Dec;9(6):297-302
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - standards - trends
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - therapy
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To determine the patterns and determinants of mobility in persons with HIV infection or AIDS on a population basis.
Descriptive cross-sectional population health study.
650 full members (i.e., HIV-positive) of the Vancouver Persons with AIDS Society who were residents of British Columbia and who allow the society to include unsolicited material with their monthly newsletter.
Migration history, access to HIV-related care at diagnosis, current and pre-HIV sociodemographic characteristics, and current health status.
Two hundred and fifty-two persons living with HIV/AIDS participated in the study. At the time of the survey, the majority of subjects were male (94 percent), aged between 30 and 54 years (87 percent), and able to carry out daily activities without assistance (84 percent). The median time since the known date of HIV infection was 6 years. Access to care at diagnosis was associated in this population with being diagnosed in the largest metropolitan area in the province (OR = 2.14; 95 percent CI: 1.18, 3.87), a pre-HIV income of $30,000 or more per annum (OR = 0.49; 95 percent CI: 0.27, 0.89), a known date of diagnosis prior to 1990 (78 percent versus 64 percent; p = 0.019), and living in the same residence from the date of known HIV diagnosis to the date of the survey (63 percent versus 51 percent; p = 0.024).
Although no definitive causal association can be provided by this cross-sectional analysis, our results clearly highlight several ways in which the need for treatment and care potentially affect where persons with HIV/AIDS choose to live.
PubMed ID
11361439 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving high acceptability of HIV testing in a population-based survey among immigrants in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265149
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Paula J Tiittala
Pia S Kivelä
Matti A Ristola
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Päivikki M S Koponen
Mulki Mölsä
Jukka Ollgren
Kirsi Liitsola
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):393-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
HIV Infections - diagnosis
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among migrants in Finland and the factors contributing to non-acceptance.
The Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study 'Maamu' was the first national population-based Health Interview and Examination Survey (HIS/HES) among migrants in Finland. A total of 386 Kurdish, Russian and Somali immigrants in Helsinki participated in the study.
Despite the participants' different sociodemographic backgrounds, a high rate of test acceptability (92%, 95% CI 90-95) was achieved. HIV test acceptance was associated with pretest counselling, ability to understand spoken Finnish or Swedish and employment status. No participants tested positive for HIV.
The results imply that a universal HIV testing strategy is well accepted in a low-HIV prevalence immigrant population and can be included in a general health examination in immigrant population-based surveys.
PubMed ID
25788469 View in PubMed
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[AIDS in Denmark. 2. Survival after the diagnosis of AIDS. Danish Study Group for HIV infection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7896
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 6;157(10):1352-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1995
Author
J D Lundgren
C. Pedersen
K D Bentsen
J. Gerstoft
T. Seefeldt-Nielsen
T L Nielsen
G F Jensen
Author Affiliation
Infektionsmedicinsk afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Mar 6;157(10):1352-6
Date
Mar-6-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - immunology - mortality
Adult
Age Factors
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - mortality
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
The survival pattern was studied for 687 Danish AIDS patients (93% of notified cases in the study period) who were diagnosed with AIDS during the period from 1980 to 1990. The median survival was 17 months. Factors significantly associated with a shortened survival were transfusion-acquired HIV infection, age > 40 years, year of diagnosis before 1987, and the presence of either disseminated infection with Mycobacterium avium-complex, Cytomegalovirus chorioretinitis or malignant lymphoma at time of the AIDS diagnosis. There was also a significant association between survival and CD4 cell count at time of AIDS diagnosis. Patients who had CD4 cell counts above 200 x 10(6)/l had twice as long a survival as patients who had CD4 cell counts less than 50 x 10(6)/l. The prognosis of Danish AIDS patients remains poor. The most important determinant of survival time appears to be the degree of immune deficiency at time of diagnosis.
PubMed ID
7709483 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDS-related risks in the health care setting: HIV testing of health care workers and patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221292
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
W F Flanagan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Queen's University, Canada.
Source
Queens Law J. 1993;18(1):71-128
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disclosure - legislation & jurisprudence
HIV Infections - diagnosis - transmission
Health Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient - prevention & control
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Testing - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Abstract
Do patients and health care workers have the legal right to know each other's HIV status? Professor Flanagan argues that they do not. Given that with appropriate precautions the risk of transmitting HIV in the health care setting is extremely small and that the discriminatory consequences of HIV disclosure can be extremely high, it is suggested that the right of a patient or a health care worker not to disclose their HIV status must outweigh the other's "right to know."
PubMed ID
16086490 View in PubMed
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Alberta: "Blood Samples" act passes third reading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177446
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2004 Aug;9(2):28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Rebecca Scheer
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2004 Aug;9(2):28
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Blood-Borne Pathogens
HIV Infections - diagnosis
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - diagnosis
Humans
Mandatory Testing
PubMed ID
15540333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta: new bill will allow for mandatory HIV testing in emergency situations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179496
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2004 Apr;9(1):20-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Rebecca Scheer
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2004 Apr;9(1):20-1
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis - legislation & jurisprudence
Alberta
Emergencies
HIV Infections - diagnosis
Humans
Mandatory Testing - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
A private member's bill is expected to be introduced in the spring 2004 session of the Alberta Legislative Assembly that will allow for forced testing of individuals for HIV, hepatitis, and other bloodborne diseases if their bodily fluids come into contact with emergency workers or Good Samaritans. The bill will likely have strong support from within the ranks of the governing Conservatives.
PubMed ID
15216809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta proclaims law authorizing forced HIV testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157357
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2007 Dec;12(2-3):30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007

297 records – page 1 of 30.