Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4102 records – page 1 of 411.

Source
State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin Bulletin No.9, March 28,2006
Publication Type
Report
Date
2006
  1 website  
Source
State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin Bulletin No.9, March 28,2006
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
HIV,HIV statistics Alaska
Notes
Includes graphs and charts of HIV cases for the year 2005 in Alaska
Online Resources
Less detail

Risk factors for HIV seropositivity among people consulting for HIV antibody testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228120
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 1;143(9):828-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1990
Author
F. Lamothe
J. Bruneau
J. Soto
M. Brabant
J. Vincelette
M. Fauvel
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 1;143(9):828-9
Date
Nov-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis
Bias (epidemiology)
HIV Antibodies - analysis
HIV Infections - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity
HIV Seroprevalence
Humans
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1990 Jul 1;143(1):25-312357678
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1990 Dec 15;143(12):1291
PubMed ID
2224705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Endogenous and exogenous interferons in HIV-infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7415
Source
Eur J Med Res. 2001 Dec 17;6(12):507-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-17-2001
Author
A V Karpov
Author Affiliation
Department of Interferons and Immunomodulators, D. Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, 03143, Ukraine. karpov_av@hotmail.com
Source
Eur J Med Res. 2001 Dec 17;6(12):507-24
Date
Dec-17-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - pharmacology
HIV - physiology
HIV Infections - physiopathology
Humans
Interferons - biosynthesis - pharmacology - physiology
Abstract
The interferons (IFNs) belong to the body's natural defensive response mechanisms directed against virus infections including also the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This review discusses the current knowledge concerning the role of IFNs types I and II during the HIV infection. The author analyzes the HIV-driven process of endogenous IFNs induction in different cell types as well as the development of unusual acid-labile IFN following the HIV infection, its nature and clinical significance. Possible action mechanisms of different exogenous IFN types against the HIV-infection are reviewed taking into consideration the stages of HIV replication accompanied by these mechanisms of action and describing both positive and negative roles of IFNs during this disease. The author discusses also some well-known IFN-inducible antiviral pathways participating in the anti-HIV mechanisms and enzymes realizing antiviral action (PKR, 2'5'-OAS, iNOS, IDO, Mx and 9-27 proteins). A problem of HIV defense against the anti-HIV IFN action as well as some aspects of HIV-accelerating IFN effects are also examined in detail.
PubMed ID
11772539 View in PubMed
Less detail

HIV protease and reverse transcriptase variation and therapy outcome in antiretroviral-naive individuals from a large North American cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194947
Source
AIDS. 2001 Mar 30;15(5):601-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2001
Author
C S Alexander
W. Dong
K. Chan
N. Jahnke
M V O'Shaughnessy
T. Mo
M A Piaseczny
J S Montaner
P R Harrigan
Author Affiliation
BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
AIDS. 2001 Mar 30;15(5):601-7
Date
Mar-30-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Genetic Variation
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
HIV Protease - genetics
HIV Reverse Transcriptase - genetics
HIV-1 - enzymology - genetics
Humans
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To assess the effect of baseline HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease sequence variation on virologic outcomes in a large cohort of antiretroviral-naive patients in British Columbia, Canada.
Population sequencing of RT and protease was performed on baseline viral RNA of all antiretroviral-naive patients first seeking treatment in British Columbia between June 1997 and August 1998 (n = 479). Relative risks of virological failure associated with genotypic differences from a 'standard' HIV strain (HXB2) were assessed for up to 18 months.
The prevalence of key baseline mutations known to confer resistance to RT and protease inhibitors (PI) was 3.4 and 3.8%, respectively. No statistically significant impact on virologic outcomes could be established for these patients. However, the data suggest that some individuals (harboring a M184V mutation in RT or a V82I in protease) may have benefited from pre-therapy resistance tests. 'Secondary' mutations in the protease associated with resistance (e.g. codons 10, 36 or 63) were common, but the presence of these secondary mutations, either alone or in combination, did not appear to result in early loss of therapeutic virological suppression. Preliminary analyses suggest that an amino acid change at codon 35 in the protease may be associated with early treatment failure.
The results suggest that routine genotyping of naive patients about to start antiretroviral therapy would be of benefit to a relatively small proportion of the population. Secondary mutations associated with resistance to PI alone were not found to affect virologic outcomes significantly.
PubMed ID
11316997 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of the Genie and western blot assays in confirmatory testing for HIV-1 antibody.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212560
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1996 Mar;44(3):223-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E L Chan
F. Sidaway
G B Horsman
Author Affiliation
Viral Serology Section, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Saskatchewan Health, Canada.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1996 Mar;44(3):223-5
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blotting, Western
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
HIV-1
HIV-2
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Reproducibility of Results
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
The Genie HIV-1/2 kit (Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur, Montreal, Quebec), a synthetic-peptide solid-phase enzyme immunoassay, was evaluated as a confirmatory assay for HIV-1 antibodies in comparison with Western blot (BioRad, Hercules, CA, USA) on 50 stored HIV-1 antibody-positive sera and the 137 sera yielding repeated positive results in the conventional EIA screen out of 13405 fresh patient sera from Saskatchewan in 1993. The stored HIV-1-positive sera were uniformly positive in the Genie test. Of the 137 EIA screen-positive sera, 33 were uniformly positive and 64 were uniformly negative in Genie and Western blot; 36 were Genie-negative and indeterminate by Western blot; and four were Genie indeterminate, of which one was negative and three were indeterminate by Western blot. All HIV-1 Western blot-indeterminate and Genie-interdeterminate sera were negative in radio-immunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) and Western blot for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies performed by a reference laboratory. Genie gave an accurate definitive result for 97% of EIA positive sera compared with 71% for Western blot. There was excellent correlation between Genie, Western blot and RIPA results. However, the Genie assay was faster, less costly and yielded fewer indeterminate results than Western blot in confirmatory testing for HIV-1 antibodies.
PubMed ID
8636942 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The epidemiological characteristics of HIV infection in Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7956
Source
Lik Sprava. 1994 Sep-Dec;(9-12):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu V Kobyshcha
A M Shcherbinskaia
N P Chentsova
N I Goregliad
I I Papushina
Iu V Kruglov
E I Kislykh
V F Morozov
M Iu Vatamaniuk
E V Maksimenok
Source
Lik Sprava. 1994 Sep-Dec;(9-12):3-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Infections - epidemiology - transmission
HIV Seroprevalence - trends
HIV-1
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper presents results of screening tests involving different groups of the population in the Ukraine, for antibodies to HIV, findings from epidemiologic investigation into cases with HIV-infection, with a view to outlining epidemiologic situation and assessing effectiveness of antiepidemic measures. HIV-transmission through sexual contacts is the commonest way of HIV-transportation in the Ukraine (66.1% of all cases of infection). An attempt is made of giving a short-term prognosis of epidemic situation in the Ukraine over a period of up to 1995. A conclusion is reached on the necessity of strengthening preventive measures with the view of influencing the unsafe forms of sexual behaviour.
PubMed ID
7604579 View in PubMed
Less detail

Guidelines for prevention of HIV infection in organ and tissue transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230041
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Oct;15 Suppl 4:1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989

Characterization of the third generation enzyme immunoassay IEA-HIV1/2-III for the detection of anti-HIV specific antibodies in human sera.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7438
Source
Folia Microbiol (Praha). 2000;45(6):577-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
G. Rayevskaya
V G Pilipenko
L. Tkáciková
N Y Spivak
I. Mikula
R M Chumak
Author Affiliation
Scientific-Production Enterprise Diaproph-Med, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
Folia Microbiol (Praha). 2000;45(6):577-80
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Reactions
Epitopes
Female
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Antigens
HIV-1 - immunology
HIV-2 - immunology
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques - methods - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The sensitivity and specificity of the developed anti-HIV1/2 third generation enzyme immunoassay, the IEA-HIV1/2-III, was examined. The test system for the detection of anti-HIV antibodies included peroxidase-conjugated HIV-specific recombinant Gag protein fragments (epitopes of p24 and p17 proteins), Env-1 (epitopes of p41 and p120 proteins), and Env-2 (p36 epitopes). Sensitivity was evaluated with 346 sera from HIV1-seropositive subjects, Anti-HIV1 Low Titer panels no. 10 and PRB-106 and seropositive panel PRB-931 in comparison with other third- and second-generation assays. The IEA-HIV1/2-III assays are characterized with high sensitivity comparable to the other third generation assays and the better sensitivity with respect to the second generation test-kit to determine HIV-specific antibodies in human sera. The specificity was determined using three hundred sixty-seven potentially cross-reactive samples (but negative for anti-HIV1/2). Only one specimen among them was reactive by IEA-HIV1/2-III.
PubMed ID
11501427 View in PubMed
Less detail

Six-week follow-up after HIV-1 exposure: a position statement from the Public Health Agency of Sweden and the Swedish Reference Group for Antiviral Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275228
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2016 Feb;48(2):93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Hans Gaines
Jan Albert
Maria Axelsson
Torsten Berglund
Magnus Gisslén
Anders Sönnerborg
Anders Blaxhult
Gordana Bogdanovic
Maria Brytting
Christina Carlander
Leo Flamholc
Per Follin
Axana Haggar
Per Hagstam
Marcus Johansson
Lars Navér
Jenny Persson Blom
Agneta Samuelson
Helena Ström
Martin Sundqvist
Veronica Svedhem Johansson
Karin Tegmark Wisell
Anders Tegnell
Rigmor Thorstensson
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2016 Feb;48(2):93-8
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Chemoprevention - methods
Early Diagnosis
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Antigens - blood
HIV Infections - diagnosis - prevention & control - virology
HIV-1 - isolation & purification
HIV-2 - isolation & purification
Health Personnel
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Post-Exposure Prophylaxis - methods
Serologic Tests - methods
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In 2014 the Public Health Agency of Sweden and the Swedish Reference Group for Antiviral Therapy (RAV) conducted a review and analysis of the state of knowledge on the duration of follow-up after exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Up until then a follow-up of 12 weeks after exposure had been recommended, but improved tests and new information on early diagnosis motivated a re-evaluation of the national recommendations by experts representing infectious diseases and microbiology, county medical officers, the RAV, the Public Health Agency, and other national authorities. Based on the current state of knowledge the Public Health Agency of Sweden and the RAV recommend, starting in April 2015, a follow-up period of 6 weeks after possible HIV-1 exposure, if HIV testing is performed using laboratory-based combination tests detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. If point-of-care rapid HIV tests are used, a follow-up period of 8 weeks is recommended, because currently available rapid tests have insufficient sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 antigen. A follow-up period of 12 weeks is recommended after a possible exposure for HIV-2, since presently used assays do not include HIV-2 antigens and only limited information is available on the development of HIV antibodies during early HIV-2 infection. If pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis is administered, the follow-up period is recommended to begin after completion of prophylaxis. Even if infection cannot be reliably excluded before the end of the recommended follow-up period, HIV testing should be performed at first contact for persons who seek such testing.
PubMed ID
26414596 View in PubMed
Less detail

4102 records – page 1 of 411.