Skip header and navigation

Refine By

71 records – page 1 of 8.

Abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168081
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Genevieve Roy
Ram Parvataneni
Brooke Friedman
Katherine Eastwood
Phillip D Darney
Jody Steinauer
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):309-14
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic - education - utilization
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Obstetrics - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical
Abstract
To study abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology (ob-gyn) residency programs.
An anonymous questionnaire was sent to all postgraduate year (PGY)-4 and PGY-5 ob-gyn residents (n=130) and residency program directors (n=16) in Canada. The questionnaires inquired about demographic information, details of abortion training, resident participation in training, and intention to provide abortions after residency.
Ninety-two of 130 residents (71%) and 15 of 16 program directors (94%) responded. Abortion training is considered routine in approximately half of programs and elective in half. The majority of residents (71%) participated in abortion training, and half plan to do elective abortions after residency. More than half of residents felt competent after training to perform first-trimester aspiration and second-trimester inductions but did not feel competent in first-trimester medical abortions or dilation and evacuation (D&E). Residents were more likely to participate in training if the program arranged the training for residents (P=.04) and were more likely to intend to provide abortions if the training was considered routine (P=.02), while controlling for all significant demographic and training variables.
Most Canadian ob-gyn programs offer some training in elective abortion, but only half include it routinely in training, and the minority of residents feels competent in D&E and medical abortion. Integrated abortion training was associated with greater resident participation in training and increased likelihood of intention to provide abortions after residency.
PubMed ID
16880300 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A course in gynecology makes the gender perspective more obvious]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52596
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 17;96(7):753-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-1999
Author
E. Hultcrantz
C. Muhr
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för öron-, näs- och halssjukdomar, Uppsala universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 17;96(7):753-6
Date
Feb-17-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Sweden
Women's health
PubMed ID
10087780 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ALARM course: 10 years of continuing professional development in intrapartum care and risk management in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167875
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2006 Jul;28(7):600-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006

An internet-based learning portfolio in resident education: the KOALA multicentre programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198717
Source
Med Educ. 2000 Jun;34(6):474-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
M F Fung
M. Walker
K F Fung
L. Temple
F. Lajoie
G. Bellemare
S C Bryson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2000 Jun;34(6):474-9
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency
Learning
Obstetrics - education
Pilot Projects
Software
Students, Medical - psychology
Teaching - methods
Abstract
To describe the Computerized Obstetrics and Gynecology Automated Learning Anaalysis (KOALAtrade mark), a multicentre, Internet-based learning portfolio and to determine its effects on residents' perception of their self-directed learning abilities.
The KOALA programme allows residents to record their obstetrical, surgical, ultrasound, and ambulatory patient encounters and to document critical incidents of learning or elements of surprise that arose during these encounters. By prompting the student to reflect on these learning experiences, KOALA encourages residents to articulate questions which can be directly pursued through hypertext links to evidence-based literature. Four Canadian residency training programmes participated in the pilot project, from February to May 1997, using a dynamic relational database with a central server. All participants completed the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale and a learning habits questionnaire. The impact of the KOALA programme on residents' perception of their self-directed learning abilities was measured by comparing KOALA-naive schools (schools 2, 3, and 4) with school 1 (exposed to the KOALA prototype for 1 year). Ordered variables were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and continuous variables with the Student t test (statistical significance P
PubMed ID
10792690 View in PubMed
Less detail

An obstetric and gynecologic clerkship's influence on a medical community. The Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho Anchorage obstetric and gynecologic clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4545
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Jun;176(6):1363-5; discussion 1366-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
H B Hanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington Medical School, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Jun;176(6):1363-5; discussion 1366-7
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Clerkship
Communication
Community Health Services - standards
Consultants
Education, Medical - standards
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Idaho
Montana
Obstetrics - education
Perception
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - standards
Washington
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Our purpose was to explore the influences of an obstetric and gynecologic medical student clerkship on a remote medical community. Return of physicians to Alaska and faculty perceptions of their experience were central foci. STUDY DESIGN: Data were obtained on former clerks to determine choice of specialty and location of practice. Data regarding all physicians new to Alaska was correlated with the University of Washington Medical School graduate data. Additionally, a questionnaire with a Likert-type scale evaluated the 10 clinical faculty members participating in the clerkship. RESULTS: Between 1978 and 1991 we trained 266 clerks. A total of 77 of 374 (21%) new physicians in Alaska (1978 to 1991) were graduates of the University of Washington; 26 of those 77 (34%) were our former Anchorage obstetrics and gynecology clerks. The clinical faculty reported both positive and negative effects of their participation in the clerkship. CONCLUSION: The desired benefit, the return of new physicians to Alaska, seemed supported. Questionnaire results hinted at additional benefits for the supervising faculty physicians in this isolated community. The formal affiliation effected by the clerkship seemed to have a positive impact on patient care, communication, consultation, and shared action among the participating physicians.
PubMed ID
9215198 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are Canadian postgraduate training programs meeting the health advocacy needs of obstetrics and gynaecology residents?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108579
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jun;35(6):539-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Julie Hakim
Amanda Black
Andrée Gruslin
Nathalie Fleming
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Newborn Care, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jun;35(6):539-46
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Male
Obstetrics - education
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Health advocacy (HA) is a core competency in Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology postgraduate programs. Our objectives were to assess awareness and understanding of the health advocate role among trainees, their current HA training and exposure, and the desire and needs for future HA training.
An anonymous, cross-sectional, Internet-based, self-reported health advocacy questionnaire was distributed to Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees. Descriptive analysis was conducted for all study variables. Chi-square tests, Cochran-Armitage trend test, and Fisher exact test were performed where appropriate.
Most trainees (93.9% of respondents) were aware of the CanMEDS HA role and that it is a training objective (92.9%). Only 52.4% had clear objectives while 58.4% understood the role requirements. Most trainees (95.1% of respondents) felt HA was important to address during training. Only 30.4% had HA training, and just 36.3% felt their training needs were addressed. Training included teaching sessions (11.9%), clinical teaching (4.7%), and role modelling (4.7%). Although 82.9% of respondents had HA opportunities with patients, there were fewer opportunities at community (45.1%) and societal (30.0%) levels. Awareness of community groups and activities was low (28.6%), and few (20.0%) had participated in community advocacy programs during their residency. Incorporating advocacy activities into training was valued (80.0%). Many residents supported mandatory HA training (60.0%), more training time on HA experiences (66.3%), and HA experiences during protected time (71.3%).
Awareness of and interest in the HA role is high, but clear objectives and training are lacking or inadequate. A standardized curriculum would ensure health advocacy exposure and emphasize active participation in community and societal activities. Trainees support this training during protected time.
PubMed ID
23870779 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing doctors as reasonable doctors and as reasonable persons: a reminder in the context of negligent transmission of HIV during artificial insemination. Ter Neuzen v. Korn.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221298
Source
J Contemp Health Law Policy. 1993;9:159-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

Assessment of intraoperative judgment during gynecologic surgery using the Script Concordance Test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143370
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Sep;203(3):240.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Amy J Park
Matthew D Barber
Alfred E Bent
Yashika T Dooley
Christina Dancz
Gary Sutkin
J Eric Jelovsek
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Sep;203(3):240.e1-6
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Decision Making
Educational Measurement
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - education
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Intraoperative Period
Judgment
Obstetrics - education
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
United States
Abstract
We sought to develop a valid, reliable assessment of intraoperative judgment by residents during gynecologic surgery based on Script Concordance Theory.
This was a multicenter prospective study involving 5 obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. Surgeons from each site generated case scenarios based on common gynecologic procedures. Construct validity was evaluated by correlating scores to training level, in-service examinations, and surgical skill and experience using a Global Rating Scale of Operative Performance and case volumes.
A final test that included 42 case scenarios was administered to 75 residents. Internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = 0.73) and test-retest reliability (Lin correlation coefficient = 0.76) were good. There were significant differences between test scores and training levels (P = .002) and test scores correlated with in-service examination scores (r = 0.38; P = .001). There was no association between test scores and total number of cases or technical skills.
The Script Concordance Test appears to be a reliable, valid assessment tool for intraoperative decision-making during gynecologic surgery.
PubMed ID
20494330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of performance measures and learning curves for use of a virtual-reality ultrasound simulator in transvaginal ultrasound examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265090
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Dec;44(6):693-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
M E Madsen
L. Konge
L N Nørgaard
A. Tabor
C. Ringsted
A K Klemmensen
B. Ottesen
M G Tolsgaard
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Dec;44(6):693-9
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Computer simulation
Denmark
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Learning Curve
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Obstetrics - education
Reproducibility of Results
Ultrasonography
User-Computer Interface
Uterus - ultrasonography
Vagina - ultrasonography
Abstract
To assess the validity and reliability of performance measures, develop credible performance standards and explore learning curves for a virtual-reality simulator designed for transvaginal gynecological ultrasound examination.
A group of 16 ultrasound novices, along with a group of 12 obstetrics/gynecology (Ob/Gyn) consultants, were included in this experimental study. The first two performances of the two groups on seven selected modules on a high-fidelity ultrasound simulator were used to identify valid and reliable metrics. Performance standards were determined and novices were instructed to continue practicing until they attained the performance level of an expert subgroup (n?=?4).
All 28 participants completed the selected modules twice and all novices reached the expert performance level. Of 153 metrics, 48 were able to be used to discriminate between the two groups' performance. The ultrasound novices scored a median of 43.8% (range, 17.9-68.9%) and the Ob/Gyn consultants scored a median of 82.8% (range, 60.4-91.7%) of the maximum sum score (P?
PubMed ID
24789453 View in PubMed
Less detail

71 records – page 1 of 8.