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Lack of radioprotection knowledge and compliance in Norwegian equine ambulatory practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301592
Source
Vet Radiol Ultrasound. 2019 May; 60(3):265-272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2019
Author
Marthe Aamodt Mikkelsen
Nina Ottesen
Bjørn Helge Knutsen
Åste Søvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Norwegian University of Life Science, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Vet Radiol Ultrasound. 2019 May; 60(3):265-272
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Guideline Adherence - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Horses
Norway
Radiation Protection - standards
Radiography - psychology
Veterinarians - psychology
Abstract
There is an increasing use of mobile radiographic units in equine ambulatory practices in Norway. Horse owners or handlers often participate in the radiographic examination in a non-controlled area. The aim of this descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study was to evaluate the radiation safety and protection in use of mobile radiography, and to identify areas where special attention from the regulatory authorities as well as veterinary educators would be required. A questionnaire was distributed to all equine veterinarians assumed to have access to mobile radiographic units, as part of a formal inspection in cooperation with the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Few practices met the regulatory requirements of notifying the authorities of their radiographic units and designation of a radiation protection officer. The minority of the practices performed periodic quality assurance of their equipment. Many of the practices performed all of their radiographic examinations off-site. The examinations were most often performed in the aisle outside the horses' stalls, and few practices established an operating zone. The horse owner or handler participated in the radiographic examination in almost all of the practices. Few practices used dosimeters for determination of the radiation exposure. The study shows that there are major deficits in regulatory compliance in ambulatory equine radiography practices in Norway. The study also suggests that less stringent regulations and supervision may translate into less stringent radioprotection practices.
PubMed ID
30604431 View in PubMed
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Nursing documentation of leg ulcers: adherence to clinical guidelines in a Swedish primary health care district.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71272
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):278-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Anna Ehrenberg
Christina Birgersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Society, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. aeh@du.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):278-84
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Continuity of Patient Care
Documentation - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Humans
Leg Ulcer - nursing
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Process - standards
Nursing Records - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Practice Guidelines
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the adherence of nursing documentation to clinical guidelines in leg ulcer patients. Using two audit instruments, 100 patient records from primary health care were reviewed. The nursing content in the records was assessed according to instructions for documentation in local clinical guidelines for leg ulcers and the comprehensiveness of the nursing process in recording was reviewed. The results indicated deficiencies in the documentation of aspects of relevance in the care of leg ulcer patients. In addition, the findings indicated flaws in the adoption of the nursing process in recording. Only one problem in one patient record was recorded that consistently used the nursing process. The conclusion is that, despite specific and locally developed guidelines for care of leg ulcer patients, nursing records did not provide a precise audit of the care process. Because patient record information without a clear structure following the nursing process tends to impede communication and evaluation of care, such defective information is likely to have a significant impact on the continuity and quality in patient care.
PubMed ID
12919463 View in PubMed
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Ontario's Community Treatment Orders: how did we get there and where do we go now? An advocate's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195339
Source
Health Law Can. 2001 Feb;21(3):66-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001

The road to smoke-free legislation in Ireland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140012
Source
Addiction. 2011 Jan;106(1):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Laura M Currie
Luke Clancy
Author Affiliation
Tobacco Free Research Institute Ireland, The Digital Depot, Dublin, Ireland.
Source
Addiction. 2011 Jan;106(1):15-24
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Female
Guideline Adherence - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Leadership
Male
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Policy Making
Public Health
Public Opinion
Public Policy
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Tobacco Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Workplace
Abstract
To describe the process through which Ireland changed its policies towards smoking in work-places and distil lessons for others implementing or extending smoke-free laws. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, MEASUREMENTS: This analysis is informed by a review of secondary sources including a commissioned media analysis, documentary analysis and key informant interviews with policy actors who provide insight into the process of smoke-free policy development. The policy analysis techniques used include the development of a time-line for policy reform, stakeholder analysis, policy mapping techniques, impact analysis through use of secondary data and a review process. The policy analysis triangle, which highlights the importance of examining policy content, context, actors and processes, will be used as an analytical framework.
The importance of the political, economic, social and cultural context emerged clearly. The interaction of the context with the policy process both in identification of need for policy and its formulation demonstrated the opportunity for advocates to exert influence at all points of the process. The campaign to support the legislation had the following characteristics: a sustained consistent simple health message, sustained political leadership/commitment, a strong coalition between the Health Alliance, the Office of Tobacco Control and the Department of Health and Children, with cross-party political support and trade union support. The public and the media support clearly defined the benefit of deliberate and consistent planning and organization of a communication strategy.
The Irish smoke-free legislation was a success as a policy initiative because of timing, dedication, planning, implementation and the existence of strong leadership and a powerful convinced credible political champion.
PubMed ID
20955215 View in PubMed
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Security middleware infrastructure for DICOM images in health information systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181791
Source
J Digit Imaging. 2003 Dec;16(4):356-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Vijay N V Kallepalli
Sylvanus A Ehikioya
Sergio Camorlinga
Jose A Rueda
Author Affiliation
Department of Computer Science, University of Manitoba, 561 Machray Hall, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada. Vijay@cs.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Digit Imaging. 2003 Dec;16(4):356-64
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Computer Communication Networks - legislation & jurisprudence
Computer Security - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Database Management Systems - legislation & jurisprudence
Guideline Adherence - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospital Information Systems - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - legislation & jurisprudence
Radiology Information Systems - legislation & jurisprudence
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
United States
Abstract
In health care, it is mandatory to maintain the privacy and confidentiality of medical data. To achieve this, a fine-grained access control and an access log for accessing medical images are two important aspects that need to be considered in health care systems. Fine-grained access control provides access to medical data only to authorized persons based on priority, location, and content. A log captures each attempt to access medical data. This article describes an overall middleware infrastructure required for secure access to Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) images, with an emphasis on access control and log maintenance. We introduce a hybrid access control model that combines the properties of two existing models. A trust relationship between hospitals is used to make the hybrid access control model scalable across hospitals. We also discuss events that have to be logged and where the log has to be maintained. A prototype of security middleware infrastructure is implemented.
Notes
Cites: J Digit Imaging. 2002;15 Suppl 1:107-1112105707
PubMed ID
14747934 View in PubMed
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Women's experiences of developing musculoskeletal diseases: employment challenges and policy recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162645
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Jul 30;29(14):1107-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-2007
Author
Valorie A Crooks
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. crooks@sfu.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Jul 30;29(14):1107-16
Date
Jul-30-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Employment - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Guideline Adherence - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications - psychology
Prejudice
Women, Working
Workplace - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Abstract
To answer three specific questions: (i) How do women experience the workplace after the onset of a musculoskeletal disease; (ii) What employment policy and programme suggestions can they offer for ways to better support chronically ill women in their abilities to maintain workforce participation; and (iii) How are these women's employment policy and programme recommendations informed by their own lived experiences and desires?
In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 women who had developed musculoskeletal diseases while involved in the labour market. Data were coded and analysed thematically.
Participants identified three common workplace barriers experienced and three types of workplace accommodations commonly requested. They offered four specific employment policy and programme recommendations for ways to better support women who develop musculoskeletal diseases in maintaining labour market participation. It is found that their employment policy and programme recommendations are informed by their own experiences in the workplace and desires for being supported in maintaining involvement in paid labour.
Creating employment programmes and policies that support chronically ill women in their attempts to remain involved in the workforce based on how much paid labour they are able to perform and where they are best able to work is of the utmost importance.
PubMed ID
17612997 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.