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18 records – page 1 of 2.

Applying the evidence: do patients with stroke, coronary artery disease, or both achieve similar treatment goals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152667
Source
Stroke. 2009 Apr;40(4):1417-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Gustavo Saposnik
Shaun G Goodman
Lawrence A Leiter
Raymond T Yan
David H Fitchett
Neville H Bayer
Amparo Casanova
Anatoly Langer
Andrew T Yan
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Canadian Heart Research Centre and Terrence Donnelly Heart Centre, University of Toronto, Canada. saposnikg@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Stroke. 2009 Apr;40(4):1417-24
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Stroke - drug therapy - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The importance of early and aggressive initiation of secondary prevention strategies for patients with both coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is emphasized by multiple guidelines. However, limited information is available on cardiovascular protection and stroke prevention in an outpatient setting from community-based populations. We sought to evaluate and compare differences in treatment patterns and the attainment of current guideline-recommended targets in unselected high-risk ambulatory patients with CAD, CVD, or both.
This multicenter, prospective, cohort study was conducted from December 2001 to December 2004 among ambulatory patients in a primary care setting. The prospective Vascular Protection and Guidelines-Oriented Approach to Lipid-Lowering Registries recruited 4933 outpatients with established CAD, CVD, or both. All patients had a complete fasting lipid profile measured within 6 months before enrollment. The primary outcome measure was the achievement of blood pressure (BP)
PubMed ID
19213947 View in PubMed
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Attitudes and beliefs related to the Canadian critical care nutrition practice guidelines: an international survey of critical care physicians and dietitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139112
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):685-96
Publication Type
Article
Author
Naomi E Cahill
Sweta Narasimhan
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):685-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Critical Care
Data Collection
Dietetics
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Therapy
Physicians
Practice Guidelines as Topic
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of critical care practitioners toward the Canadian Critical Care Nutrition Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and compare them with actual practice.
An international Web-based survey was conducted. Respondents were asked to rate their strength of recommendation for 26 nutrition practices included in the Canadian CPGs. Attitudinal results were compared with actual practice on each recommendation.
514 practitioners from 27 countries completed the survey. The majority (91.4%) considered nutrition therapy to be very important for critically ill patients. There was strong endorsement for the following established practices: enteral nutrition (EN) used in preference to parenteral nutrition (PN), use of polymeric solutions and feeding protocols, and avoiding hyperglycemia. There was also strong endorsement for the following practices that are not routinely done in actual practice: EN initiated within 24 to 48 hours of admission, use of motility agents, head-of-bed elevation, use of glutamine and antioxidants, and maximizing EN before starting PN. There was diversity of opinion on the recommendations pertaining to arginine-supplemented diets, small bowel feeding, use of pharmaconutrients, intensive insulin therapy, and withholding soybean oil lipids in PN solutions and hypocaloric PN.
Overall, attitudes toward the Canadian CPGs were positive. However, we identified some areas where there was diversity of opinion, highlighting a need for further research and education. System tools may be a useful strategy to integrate guideline recommendations into practice where there is strong endorsement but the recommendation is not happening in actual practice.
Notes
Comment In: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):606-721097759
PubMed ID
21097769 View in PubMed
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The Canadian critical care nutrition guidelines in 2013: an update on current recommendations and implementation strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105874
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2014 Feb;29(1):29-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Naomi Cahill
Margot Lemieux
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Daren K. Heyland, MSc, Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, 76 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada. Email: dkh2@queensu.ca.
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2014 Feb;29(1):29-43
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care - methods
Enteral Nutrition - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances, and are designed to minimize practice variation, improve costs, and improve clinical outcomes. The Canadian Critical Care Practice Guidelines (CCPGs) were first published in 2003 and most recently updated in 2013. A total of 68 new randomized controlled trials were identified since the last version in 2009, 50 of them published between 2009 and 2013. The remaining articles were trials published before 2009 but were not identified in previous iterations of the CCPGs. For clinical practice guidelines to be useful to practitioners, they need to be up-to-date and be reflective of the current body of evidence. Herein we describe the process by which the CCPGs were updated. This process resulted in 10 new sections or clinical topics. Of the old clinical topics, 3 recommendations were upgraded, 4 were downgraded, and 27 remained the same. To influence decision making at the bedside, these updated guidelines need to be accompanied by active guideline implementation strategies. Optimal implementation strategies should be guided by local contextual factors including barriers and facilitators to best practice recommendations. Moreover, evaluating and monitoring performance, such as participating in the International Nutrition Survey of practice, should be part of any intensive care unit's performance improvement strategy. The active implementation of the updated CCPGs may lead to better nutrition care and improved patient outcomes in the critical care setting.
PubMed ID
24297678 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and evidence-based management of stable coronary artery disease patients in Canada compared with the rest of the world: insights from the CLARIFY registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106123
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Jan;30(1):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Sumeet Gandhi
Paul Dorian
Nicola Greenlaw
Jean-Claude Tardif
P Gabriel Steg
Thao Huynh
Graham C Wong
Michael P Love
Paul Poirier
Shaun G Goodman
Author Affiliation
Terrence Donnelly Heart Centre, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Jan;30(1):132-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Secondary Prevention - methods
World Health
Abstract
Previous Canadian high vascular risk registries have demonstrated suboptimal goal-directed reductions in cardiovascular risk factors and underutilization of guideline-recommended therapies in part because of physician underestimation of cardiovascular risk.
The Prospective Observational Longitudinal Registry of Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease (CLARIFY) registry enrolled 33,438 stable coronary artery disease patients in 45 countries. In Canada, supplemental information was obtained specifying reasons that patients were not taking guideline-recommended medications.
In Canada, 1232 patients (9 provinces, 110 physicians) were enrolled and in comparison with the rest of the world, there were several differences in cardiovascular risk factors and medical history; in addition, the Canadian cohort had undergone less percutaneous coronary intervention, but more coronary artery bypass grafting. Among the Canadian cohort, many still continue to smoke (13%) and many do not meet secondary prevention targets for waist circumference (54%), body mass index (81%), physical activity (71%), cholesterol (43%), and systolic blood pressure (20%). Nevertheless, the use of guideline-recommended cardiovascular therapy was high and >90% reported partial/full financial coverage for medications. The number of patients not receiving guideline-recommended therapies because of apparent underestimation of risk was particularly low for antiplatelet agents (2%), ß-blockers (11%), and lipid-lowering therapies (1%).
Canadian patients with stable coronary artery disease did not meet several guideline-recommended secondary prevention targets, despite high use of evidence-based therapy, extensive financial coverage for these medications, and low physician underestimation of risk. Additional work is needed to identify and address the remaining barriers to effective risk factor control.
PubMed ID
24238756 View in PubMed
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Development and psychometric properties of a questionnaire to assess barriers to feeding critically ill patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105823
Source
Implement Sci. 2013;8:140
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Naomi E Cahill
Andrew G Day
Deborah Cook
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Carruthers Hall, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. cahilln@kgh.kari.net.
Source
Implement Sci. 2013;8:140
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Critical Illness
Enteral Nutrition - utilization
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
To successfully implement the recommendations of critical care nutrition guidelines, one potential approach is to identify barriers to providing optimal enteral nutrition (EN) in the intensive care unit (ICU), and then address these barriers systematically. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire to assess barriers to enterally feeding critically ill patients and to conduct preliminary validity testing of the new instrument.
The content of the questionnaire was guided by a published conceptual framework, literature review, and consultation with experts. The questionnaire was pre-tested on a convenience sample of 32 critical care practitioners, and then field tested with 186 critical care providers working at 5 hospitals in North America. The revised questionnaire was pilot tested at another ICU (n = 43). Finally, the questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of ICU nurses twice, two weeks apart, to determine test retest reliability (n = 17). Descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach alpha, intraclass correlations (ICC), and kappa coefficients were conducted to assess validity and reliability.
We developed a questionnaire with 26 potential barriers to delivery of EN asking respondents to rate their importance as barriers in their ICU. Face and content validity of the questionnaire was established through literature review and expert input. The factor analysis indicated a five-factor solution and accounted for 72% of the variance in barriers: guideline recommendations and implementation strategies, delivery of EN to the patient, critical care provider attitudes and behavior, dietitian support, and ICU resources. Overall, the indices of internal reliability for the derived factor subscales and the overall instrument were acceptable (subscale Cronbach alphas range 0.84 - 0.89). However, the test retest reliability was variable and below acceptable thresholds for the majority of items (ICC's range -0.13 to 0.70). The within group agreement, an indices reflecting the reliability of aggregating individual responses to the ICU level was also variable (ICC's range 0.0 to 0.82).
We developed a questionnaire to identify barriers to enteral feeding in critically ill patients. Additional studies are planned to further revise and evaluate the reliability and validity of the instrument.
PubMed ID
24305039 View in PubMed
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Factors predicting adherence to the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for nutrition support in mechanically ventilated, critically ill adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155514
Source
J Crit Care. 2008 Sep;23(3):301-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Naomi E Jones
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Andrew G Day
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
Source
J Crit Care. 2008 Sep;23(3):301-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Critical Illness - therapy
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Bed Capacity - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Community - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Respiration, Artificial
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine factors that are associated with adherence to the Canadian nutrition support clinical practice guidelines (CPGs).
We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective observational cohort study of nutrition support practices in 58 intensive care units (ICUs) across Canada, grouped into 50 clusters. Adequacy of enteral nutrition (EN) (energy received from EN / energy prescribed by the dietitian x 100), was used as a marker of adherence to the guidelines. We applied hierarchical modeling techniques to examine the impact of various hospital, ICU, and patient factors on EN adequacy.
The overall average EN adequacy was 51.3% (SE, 1.8%). In a multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for varying days of observation, hospital type (academic 54.3% vs community 45.2%, P
PubMed ID
18725033 View in PubMed
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Implementation of clinical practice guidelines for ventilator-associated pneumonia: a multicenter prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118301
Source
Crit Care Med. 2013 Jan;41(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Tasnim Sinuff
John Muscedere
Deborah J Cook
Peter M Dodek
William Anderson
Sean P Keenan
Gordon Wood
Richard Tan
Marilyn T Haupt
Michael Miletin
Redouane Bouali
Xuran Jiang
Andrew G Day
Janet Overvelde
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center and Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. taz.sinuff@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Crit Care Med. 2013 Jan;41(1):15-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Translational Medical Research
United States
Abstract
Ventilator-associated pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia may improve outcomes, but optimal methods to ensure implementation of guidelines in the intensive care unit are unclear. Hence, we determined the effect of educational sessions augmented with reminders, and led by local opinion leaders, as strategies to implement evidence-based ventilator-associated pneumonia guidelines on guideline concordance and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates.
Two-year prospective, multicenter, time-series study conducted between June 2007 and December 2009.
Eleven ICUs (ten in Canada, one in the United States); five academic and six community ICUs.
At each site, 30 adult patients mechanically ventilated >48 hrs were enrolled during four data collection periods (baseline, 6, 15, and 24 months).
Guideline recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia were implemented using a multifaceted intervention (education, reminders, local opinion leaders, and implementation teams) directed toward the entire multidisciplinary ICU team. Clinician exposure to the intervention was assessed at 6, 15, and 24 months after the introduction of this intervention.
The main outcome measure was aggregate concordance with the 14 ventilator-associated pneumonia guideline recommendations. One thousand three hundred twenty patients were enrolled (330 in each study period). Clinician exposure to the multifaceted intervention was high and increased during the study: 86.7%, 93.3%, 95.8%, (p
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2013 Jan;41(1):329-3123269134
PubMed ID
23222254 View in PubMed
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Implementation of the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Nutrition Support: a multiple case study of barriers and enablers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162343
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2007 Aug;22(4):449-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Naomi E Jones
Jeanette Suurdt
Hélène Ouelette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 2V7.
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2007 Aug;22(4):449-57
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Competence
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care - methods - psychology - standards
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - methods - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
The Canadian Nutrition Support Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), published in 2003, were designed to improve nutrition support practices in intensive care units (ICUs). However, their impact to date has been modest. This study aimed to identify important barriers and enablers to implementation of these guidelines.
Case studies were completed at 4 Canadian ICUs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 7 key informants at each site. During the interviews, the key informants were asked about their perceptions of the barriers and enablers to implementation of the Canadian Nutrition Support CPGs. Interview transcripts were analyzed qualitatively, using a framework approach.
Resistance to change, lack of awareness, lack of critical care experience, clinical condition of the patient, resource constraints, a slow administrative process, workload, numerous guidelines, complex recommendations, paucity of evidence, and outdated guidelines were cited as the main barriers to guideline implementation. Agreement of the ICU team, easy access to the guidelines, ease of application, incorporation into daily routine, education and training, the dietitian as an opinion leader, and open discussion were identified as the primary enabling factors. Although consistent across all sites, the influence of these factors seemed to differ by site and profession.
Our findings suggest that implementation of the Canadian Nutrition Support CPGs is profoundly complex and is determined by practitioner, patient, institutional, and guideline factors. Further research is required to quantify the impact of each barrier and enabler and the mechanism by which they influence guideline adherence.
PubMed ID
17644700 View in PubMed
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Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):610-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daren K Heyland
Naomi E Cahill
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. dkh2@queensu.ca
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):610-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care - methods - standards
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Nutritional Sciences
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
Critical care nutrition guidelines have been developed to help busy practitioners decide how to feed their critically ill patients. However, despite the publication of guidelines and efforts to disseminate and implement them, there are large gaps between what the recommendations say and what is happening at the bedside. Consequently, the nutrition therapy received by many patients remains suboptimal. Knowledge translation is a term increasingly used in healthcare to describe the process of moving evidence learned from clinical research and summarized in clinical practice guidelines to incorporation into clinical and policy decision making. In this article, knowledge about the implementation of critical care nutrition guidelines is applied to Graham et al's knowledge-to-action model to illuminate the issues pertinent to knowledge translation in critical care nutrition. This model has 2 components: knowledge creation and action. The action component consists of 8 phases of the action cycle that represent activities needed to move knowledge into practice and are derived from planned-action theory. Components of this model are illustrated via empirically derived research, commentaries, and published studies from the field of critical care nutrition. It is hoped that this article and related articles in this issue of JPEN will help critical care nutrition practitioners to better understand the often complex and convoluted road of translating knowledge into practice so that as a community we are no longer "lost" but have direction that can bring about positive changes in nutrition practice.
PubMed ID
21097761 View in PubMed
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Management of risk factors among ambulatory patients at high cardiovascular risk in Canada: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107202
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1586-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Esam A Elbarasi
Shaun G Goodman
Raymond T Yan
Mary K Tan
Daniel G Hackam
Lawrence A Leiter
Anatoly Langer
Andrew T Yan
Author Affiliation
Terrence Donnelly Heart Centre, Division of Cardiology, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1586-92
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - drug therapy
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Limited longitudinal data are available on attainment of guideline-recommended treatment targets among ambulatory patients at high risk for cardiovascular events.
The Vascular Protection registry and the Guidelines Oriented Approach to Lipid Lowering registry recruited 8056 ambulatory patients at high risk for, or with established cardiovascular disease; follow-up was not protocol-mandated. We stratified the study population according to the availability of 6-month follow-up data into 2 groups, and compared their clinical characteristics, medication profile, and attainment of contemporaneous guideline-recommended blood pressure (BP) and lipid targets both at enrollment and at 6-month follow-up.
Of the 8056 patients, only 5371 (66.7%) patients had 6-month follow-up, who had significant increases in the use of statins and antihypertensive medications at 6 months compared with at enrollment (all P 50%) patients without 6-month follow-up did not attain guideline-recommended BP and LDL-C targets at enrollment. Although BP and lipid control improved at 6 months among patients with follow-up, most still failed to achieve optimal BP and lipid targets. Effective ongoing quality improvement measures and follow-up are warranted.
PubMed ID
24041994 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.