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Attitudes and beliefs related to the Canadian critical care nutrition practice guidelines: an international survey of critical care physicians and dietitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139112
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):685-96
Publication Type
Article
Author
Naomi E Cahill
Sweta Narasimhan
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):685-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Critical Care
Data Collection
Dietetics
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Therapy
Physicians
Practice Guidelines as Topic
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of critical care practitioners toward the Canadian Critical Care Nutrition Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and compare them with actual practice.
An international Web-based survey was conducted. Respondents were asked to rate their strength of recommendation for 26 nutrition practices included in the Canadian CPGs. Attitudinal results were compared with actual practice on each recommendation.
514 practitioners from 27 countries completed the survey. The majority (91.4%) considered nutrition therapy to be very important for critically ill patients. There was strong endorsement for the following established practices: enteral nutrition (EN) used in preference to parenteral nutrition (PN), use of polymeric solutions and feeding protocols, and avoiding hyperglycemia. There was also strong endorsement for the following practices that are not routinely done in actual practice: EN initiated within 24 to 48 hours of admission, use of motility agents, head-of-bed elevation, use of glutamine and antioxidants, and maximizing EN before starting PN. There was diversity of opinion on the recommendations pertaining to arginine-supplemented diets, small bowel feeding, use of pharmaconutrients, intensive insulin therapy, and withholding soybean oil lipids in PN solutions and hypocaloric PN.
Overall, attitudes toward the Canadian CPGs were positive. However, we identified some areas where there was diversity of opinion, highlighting a need for further research and education. System tools may be a useful strategy to integrate guideline recommendations into practice where there is strong endorsement but the recommendation is not happening in actual practice.
Notes
Comment In: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):606-721097759
PubMed ID
21097769 View in PubMed
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Canada's physical activity guide recommendations are a low benchmark for Manitoba adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151511
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Apr;34(2):172-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
A Elizabeth Ready
Janice E Butcher
James B Dear
Paul Fieldhouse
Sande Harlos
Alan Katz
Michael Moffatt
Maureen Rodrigue
Jan Schmalenberg
Phillip F Gardiner
Author Affiliation
Health Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, and Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T2N2, Canada. readyae@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Apr;34(2):172-81
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Energy Metabolism
Female
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Policy
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Public Health
Young Adult
Abstract
Canada's Physical Activity Guide to Healthy Active Living (CPAG) is the national reference for messaging on physical activity for health benefits, yet few studies have examined population activity levels in relation to its recommendations. As part of the province-wide in motion initiative, we obtained a baseline measurement of the physical activity levels of adult Manitobans. Physical activity levels were benchmarked against CPAG recommendations and were compared with criteria used in previous surveys. A stratified random sample of adults from the 9 Regional Health Authorities outside of Winnipeg, and from the 12 Community Areas within the Winnipeg Health Region, was surveyed by telephone. Respondents (n = 6,536) reported all light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity of 10 min or more in the previous week. Intensity levels were corrected to reflect standard MET equivalents, using the Ainsworth Compendium. A total of 69.5% of respondents met the minimum CPAG requirements; however, only 29.1% of those did so with vigorous activity. Relative to energy expenditure, 18.3% were classified as inactive (or=3.00 KKD). When assessed against the CPAG recommendations, which promote integration of physical activity into one's daily routine, a higher proportion of Manitobans met recommended physical activity levels than that reported in previous surveys, which focused on leisure activity. Given the corresponding increase in levels of obesity and chronic disease, and equivocal nutrient intake data, we recommend that the CPAG recommendations be reviewed, especially with respect to the inclusion of routine baseline activities of daily living.
PubMed ID
19370047 View in PubMed
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The Canadian critical care nutrition guidelines in 2013: an update on current recommendations and implementation strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105874
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2014 Feb;29(1):29-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Naomi Cahill
Margot Lemieux
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Daren K. Heyland, MSc, Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, 76 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada. Email: dkh2@queensu.ca.
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2014 Feb;29(1):29-43
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care - methods
Enteral Nutrition - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances, and are designed to minimize practice variation, improve costs, and improve clinical outcomes. The Canadian Critical Care Practice Guidelines (CCPGs) were first published in 2003 and most recently updated in 2013. A total of 68 new randomized controlled trials were identified since the last version in 2009, 50 of them published between 2009 and 2013. The remaining articles were trials published before 2009 but were not identified in previous iterations of the CCPGs. For clinical practice guidelines to be useful to practitioners, they need to be up-to-date and be reflective of the current body of evidence. Herein we describe the process by which the CCPGs were updated. This process resulted in 10 new sections or clinical topics. Of the old clinical topics, 3 recommendations were upgraded, 4 were downgraded, and 27 remained the same. To influence decision making at the bedside, these updated guidelines need to be accompanied by active guideline implementation strategies. Optimal implementation strategies should be guided by local contextual factors including barriers and facilitators to best practice recommendations. Moreover, evaluating and monitoring performance, such as participating in the International Nutrition Survey of practice, should be part of any intensive care unit's performance improvement strategy. The active implementation of the updated CCPGs may lead to better nutrition care and improved patient outcomes in the critical care setting.
PubMed ID
24297678 View in PubMed
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Canadian Quality Circle pilot project in osteoporosis: rationale, methods, and feasibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160847
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Oct;53(10):1694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
George Ioannidis
Alexandra Papaioannou
Lehana Thabane
Amiram Gafni
Anthony Hodsman
Brent Kvern
Dan Johnstone
Nathalie Plumley
Alanna Baldwin
M. Doupe
Alan Katz
Lena Salach
Jonathan D Adachi
Author Affiliation
McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. g.ioannidis@sympatico.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Oct;53(10):1694-700
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Family Practice - education - methods - standards
Feasibility Studies
Female
Guideline Adherence - organization & administration
Humans
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
PROBLEM ADDRESSED Family physicians are not adequately following the 2002 Osteoporosis Canada guidelines for providing optimal care to patients with osteoporosis.
The Canadian Quality Circle (CQC) pilot project was developed to assess the feasibility of the CQC project design and to gather information for implementing a national study of quality circles (QCs). The national study would assess whether use ofQCs could improve family physicians' adherence to the osteoporosis guidelines.
The pilot project enrolled 52 family physicians and involved 7 QCs. The project had 3 phases: training and baseline data collection, educational intervention and follow-up data collection, and sessions on implementing strategies for care.
Findings from the pilot study showed that the CQC project was well designed and well received. Use of QCs appeared to be feasible for transferring knowledge and giving physicians an opportunity to analyze work-related problems and develop solutions to them.
Notes
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Erratum In: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Dec;53(12):2105
PubMed ID
17934033 View in PubMed
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Development and psychometric properties of a questionnaire to assess barriers to feeding critically ill patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105823
Source
Implement Sci. 2013;8:140
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Naomi E Cahill
Andrew G Day
Deborah Cook
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Carruthers Hall, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. cahilln@kgh.kari.net.
Source
Implement Sci. 2013;8:140
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Critical Illness
Enteral Nutrition - utilization
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
To successfully implement the recommendations of critical care nutrition guidelines, one potential approach is to identify barriers to providing optimal enteral nutrition (EN) in the intensive care unit (ICU), and then address these barriers systematically. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire to assess barriers to enterally feeding critically ill patients and to conduct preliminary validity testing of the new instrument.
The content of the questionnaire was guided by a published conceptual framework, literature review, and consultation with experts. The questionnaire was pre-tested on a convenience sample of 32 critical care practitioners, and then field tested with 186 critical care providers working at 5 hospitals in North America. The revised questionnaire was pilot tested at another ICU (n = 43). Finally, the questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of ICU nurses twice, two weeks apart, to determine test retest reliability (n = 17). Descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach alpha, intraclass correlations (ICC), and kappa coefficients were conducted to assess validity and reliability.
We developed a questionnaire with 26 potential barriers to delivery of EN asking respondents to rate their importance as barriers in their ICU. Face and content validity of the questionnaire was established through literature review and expert input. The factor analysis indicated a five-factor solution and accounted for 72% of the variance in barriers: guideline recommendations and implementation strategies, delivery of EN to the patient, critical care provider attitudes and behavior, dietitian support, and ICU resources. Overall, the indices of internal reliability for the derived factor subscales and the overall instrument were acceptable (subscale Cronbach alphas range 0.84 - 0.89). However, the test retest reliability was variable and below acceptable thresholds for the majority of items (ICC's range -0.13 to 0.70). The within group agreement, an indices reflecting the reliability of aggregating individual responses to the ICU level was also variable (ICC's range 0.0 to 0.82).
We developed a questionnaire to identify barriers to enteral feeding in critically ill patients. Additional studies are planned to further revise and evaluate the reliability and validity of the instrument.
PubMed ID
24305039 View in PubMed
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Encouraging physician appropriate prescribing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapies: protocol of a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN43532635].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178678
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2004 Aug 24;4(1):21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2004
Author
Malcolm Doupe
Alan Katz
Brent Kvern
Lori-Jean Manness
Colleen Metge
Glen T D Thomson
Laura Morrison
Kat Rother
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Research Unit, St Boniface Research Centre, Winnipeg, Canada. mdoupe@sbrc.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2004 Aug 24;4(1):21
Date
Aug-24-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization Review
Education, Medical, Continuing
Feedback
Gastrointestinal Agents - therapeutic use
Guideline Adherence
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Inflammation - drug therapy
Manitoba
Medical Audit
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain - drug therapy
Physicians, Family - education
Abstract
Traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a widely used class of therapy in the treatment of chronic pain and inflammation. The drugs are effective and can be relatively inexpensive thanks to available generic versions. Unfortunately the traditional NSAIDs are associated with gastrointestinal complications in a small proportion of patients, requiring costly co-therapy with gastro-protective agents. Recently, a new class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents known as coxibs has become available, fashioned to be safer than the traditional NSAIDs but priced considerably higher than the traditional generics. To help physicians choose appropriately and cost-effectively from the expanded number of anti-inflammatory therapies, scientific bodies have issued clinical practice guidelines and third party payers have published restricted reimbursement policies. The objective of this study is to determine whether an educational intervention can prompt physicians to adjust their prescribing in accordance with these expert recommendations.
This is an ongoing, randomized controlled trial. All primary care physicians in Manitoba, Canada have been randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention study group. The educational intervention being evaluated consists of an audit and feedback mechanism combined with optional participation in a Continuing Medical Education interactive workshop. The primary outcome of the study is the change, from pre-to post-intervention, in physicians' appropriate prescribing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapies for patients requiring chronic treatment. Three classes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapies have been identified: coxib therapy, traditional NSAID monotherapy, and traditional NSAID therapy combined with gastro-protective agents. Appropriate prescribing is defined based on international clinical practice guidelines and the provincial drug reimbursement policy in Manitoba.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15327694 View in PubMed
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Factors predicting adherence to the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for nutrition support in mechanically ventilated, critically ill adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155514
Source
J Crit Care. 2008 Sep;23(3):301-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Naomi E Jones
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Andrew G Day
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
Source
J Crit Care. 2008 Sep;23(3):301-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Critical Illness - therapy
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Bed Capacity - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Community - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Respiration, Artificial
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine factors that are associated with adherence to the Canadian nutrition support clinical practice guidelines (CPGs).
We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective observational cohort study of nutrition support practices in 58 intensive care units (ICUs) across Canada, grouped into 50 clusters. Adequacy of enteral nutrition (EN) (energy received from EN / energy prescribed by the dietitian x 100), was used as a marker of adherence to the guidelines. We applied hierarchical modeling techniques to examine the impact of various hospital, ICU, and patient factors on EN adequacy.
The overall average EN adequacy was 51.3% (SE, 1.8%). In a multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for varying days of observation, hospital type (academic 54.3% vs community 45.2%, P
PubMed ID
18725033 View in PubMed
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Implementation of clinical practice guidelines for ventilator-associated pneumonia: a multicenter prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118301
Source
Crit Care Med. 2013 Jan;41(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Tasnim Sinuff
John Muscedere
Deborah J Cook
Peter M Dodek
William Anderson
Sean P Keenan
Gordon Wood
Richard Tan
Marilyn T Haupt
Michael Miletin
Redouane Bouali
Xuran Jiang
Andrew G Day
Janet Overvelde
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center and Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. taz.sinuff@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Crit Care Med. 2013 Jan;41(1):15-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Translational Medical Research
United States
Abstract
Ventilator-associated pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia may improve outcomes, but optimal methods to ensure implementation of guidelines in the intensive care unit are unclear. Hence, we determined the effect of educational sessions augmented with reminders, and led by local opinion leaders, as strategies to implement evidence-based ventilator-associated pneumonia guidelines on guideline concordance and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates.
Two-year prospective, multicenter, time-series study conducted between June 2007 and December 2009.
Eleven ICUs (ten in Canada, one in the United States); five academic and six community ICUs.
At each site, 30 adult patients mechanically ventilated >48 hrs were enrolled during four data collection periods (baseline, 6, 15, and 24 months).
Guideline recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia were implemented using a multifaceted intervention (education, reminders, local opinion leaders, and implementation teams) directed toward the entire multidisciplinary ICU team. Clinician exposure to the intervention was assessed at 6, 15, and 24 months after the introduction of this intervention.
The main outcome measure was aggregate concordance with the 14 ventilator-associated pneumonia guideline recommendations. One thousand three hundred twenty patients were enrolled (330 in each study period). Clinician exposure to the multifaceted intervention was high and increased during the study: 86.7%, 93.3%, 95.8%, (p
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2013 Jan;41(1):329-3123269134
PubMed ID
23222254 View in PubMed
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Implementation of the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Nutrition Support: a multiple case study of barriers and enablers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162343
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2007 Aug;22(4):449-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Naomi E Jones
Jeanette Suurdt
Hélène Ouelette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 2V7.
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2007 Aug;22(4):449-57
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Competence
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care - methods - psychology - standards
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - methods - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
The Canadian Nutrition Support Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), published in 2003, were designed to improve nutrition support practices in intensive care units (ICUs). However, their impact to date has been modest. This study aimed to identify important barriers and enablers to implementation of these guidelines.
Case studies were completed at 4 Canadian ICUs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 7 key informants at each site. During the interviews, the key informants were asked about their perceptions of the barriers and enablers to implementation of the Canadian Nutrition Support CPGs. Interview transcripts were analyzed qualitatively, using a framework approach.
Resistance to change, lack of awareness, lack of critical care experience, clinical condition of the patient, resource constraints, a slow administrative process, workload, numerous guidelines, complex recommendations, paucity of evidence, and outdated guidelines were cited as the main barriers to guideline implementation. Agreement of the ICU team, easy access to the guidelines, ease of application, incorporation into daily routine, education and training, the dietitian as an opinion leader, and open discussion were identified as the primary enabling factors. Although consistent across all sites, the influence of these factors seemed to differ by site and profession.
Our findings suggest that implementation of the Canadian Nutrition Support CPGs is profoundly complex and is determined by practitioner, patient, institutional, and guideline factors. Further research is required to quantify the impact of each barrier and enabler and the mechanism by which they influence guideline adherence.
PubMed ID
17644700 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):610-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daren K Heyland
Naomi E Cahill
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. dkh2@queensu.ca
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):610-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Critical Care - methods - standards
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Nutritional Sciences
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
Critical care nutrition guidelines have been developed to help busy practitioners decide how to feed their critically ill patients. However, despite the publication of guidelines and efforts to disseminate and implement them, there are large gaps between what the recommendations say and what is happening at the bedside. Consequently, the nutrition therapy received by many patients remains suboptimal. Knowledge translation is a term increasingly used in healthcare to describe the process of moving evidence learned from clinical research and summarized in clinical practice guidelines to incorporation into clinical and policy decision making. In this article, knowledge about the implementation of critical care nutrition guidelines is applied to Graham et al's knowledge-to-action model to illuminate the issues pertinent to knowledge translation in critical care nutrition. This model has 2 components: knowledge creation and action. The action component consists of 8 phases of the action cycle that represent activities needed to move knowledge into practice and are derived from planned-action theory. Components of this model are illustrated via empirically derived research, commentaries, and published studies from the field of critical care nutrition. It is hoped that this article and related articles in this issue of JPEN will help critical care nutrition practitioners to better understand the often complex and convoluted road of translating knowledge into practice so that as a community we are no longer "lost" but have direction that can bring about positive changes in nutrition practice.
PubMed ID
21097761 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.