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Alcohol withdrawal-induced change in lipoprotein(a): association with the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) axis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10904
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1998 Apr;18(4):650-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
M. Paassilta
K. Kervinen
M. Linnaluoto
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Finland. marita.paassilta@oulu.fi
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1998 Apr;18(4):650-4
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - therapy
Body mass index
Ethanol - adverse effects
Human Growth Hormone - urine
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Lipoprotein(a) - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - blood
Abstract
Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Alcohol is one of the few nongenetic factors that lower Lp(a) levels, but the metabolic mechanisms of this action are unknown. Alcohol inhibits the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis. Alcohol might also affect IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), which is an acute inhibitor of IGF-I. We studied how alcohol withdrawal affects Lp(a) levels and the GH/IGF-I/IGFBP-1 axis. Male alcohol abusers (n=27; 20 to 64 years old) were monitored immediately after alcohol withdrawal for 4 days. Twenty-six healthy men, mainly moderate drinkers, served as control subjects. Fasting blood samples were drawn to determine Lp(a), IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 (by ELISA, RIA, and immunoenzymometric assay, respectively). Nocturnal (12 hours) urine collection was performed in 9 alcoholics and 11 control subjects for GH analyses (RIA). The groups were similar in age and body mass index. Lp(a), GH, and IGF-I tended to be lower and IGFBP-1 higher in the alcoholics immediately after alcohol withdrawal than in the control subjects. During the 4-day observation in alcoholics, Lp(a) levels increased by 64% and IGF-I levels by 41%, whereas IGFBP-1 levels decreased by 59% (P
PubMed ID
9555872 View in PubMed
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Urinary growth hormone excretion in 657 healthy children and adults: normal values, inter- and intraindividual variations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37375
Source
Horm Res. 1991;36(5-6):174-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
K. Main
M. Philips
M. Jørgensen
N E Skakkebaek
Author Affiliation
University Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Horm Res. 1991;36(5-6):174-82
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Growth Hormone - urine
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Puberty - urine
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Urinary growth hormone (u-GH) excretion was measured in 547 healthy children and 110 adults by ELISA with a detection limit of 1.1 ng/l u-GH after prior concentration of the urine samples (20- to 30-fold). u-GH excretion values were significantly dependent on the pubertal stage (p less than 0.0001) with maximum values in Tanner stage 3 for girls and 4 for boys. This corresponded to a peak in u-GH excretion between 11.5-14.5 years in girls and 12.5-16 years in boys. Additionally, u-GH excretion in adults was significantly higher than in prepubertal children (p less than 0.001). The day/night ratio of u-GH excretion (pg/h) was significantly higher in females than in males (p less than 0.01). In Tanner stages 1-4, u-GH excretion during the day was lower than that at night, whereas the opposite was true in late puberty and in adult women. The interindividual variation of u-GH excretion within the same Tanner stage was considerable and approximately double the intraindividual variation. The day-to-day variation could be further reduced by collection of three consecutive urine samples. The variations were larger if night samples instead of 24-hour samples were considered. The expression of u-GH excretion in nanograms per gram creatinine did not diminish the observed variation and blunted the pubertal increase in u-GH excretion. In conclusion, (1) u-GH excretion depends significantly on age, sex and pubertal maturation as does the day/night ratio of u-GH excretion. (2) The interindividual variation in u-GH excretion is considerable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1823075 View in PubMed
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