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The association between prolonged breastfeeding and poor growth--what are the implications?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32485
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:193-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
J P Habicht
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:193-200
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Breast Feeding
Causality
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Developing Countries
Dietary Supplements
Growth
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Abstract
The smaller size of breast fed children in infancy and thereafter in malnourished and well-nourished populations has resulted in rushes to judgement that have been shown to be ill-advised. The reasons for the smaller size in malnourished populations is due to retaining the small and sickly child at the breast (reverse causality) and the consequent continuing sickliness of this breast fed child (negative confounding). Once the reverse causality and negative confounding have been taken into account breast feeding improves growth, at least through the second year of life. Thus prolonged breastfeeding should always be fostered, especially in malnourished populations. An exception remains when breast milk may transmit disease to the suckling child. In well-nourished populations the magnitude of the difference between breast fed and weaned children is much less than in malnourished populations, is observed to increase over the first year of life, but to have disappeared by the end of the second year. One may never-the-less be concerned that complimentary feeding practices are not adequate for these children.
PubMed ID
11065072 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical characteristics and factors affecting growth in long-term survivors of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22749
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
K K Talvensaari
M. Knip
P. Lanning
M. Lanning
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):166-72
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
6-Mercaptopurine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Cranial Irradiation - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth - drug effects - radiation effects
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survivors
Abstract
We evaluated clinical characteristics and growth in 51 (24 males) long-term survivors of childhood cancer (median follow up 12.7 years). Patients were shorter, had a higher proportion of body fat and higher systolic blood pressure than their controls. The change in relative height during treatment was -0.83 standard deviation score (S.D.S.) in patients with cranial irradiation and -0.32 S.D.S. in patients without cranial irradiation; the figures after treatment were -0.56 and 0.20 S.D.S., respectively. Half (r2 = 0.50) of the variation in growth retardation during therapy could be explained by the cumulative doses of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and vincristine and relative height at diagnosis. Cranial irradiation, increased relative height at diagnosis and young age at diagnosis were significant predictors of growth failure over the total observation period, explaining 43% of the variation. We conclude that long-term survivors of childhood cancer have impaired linear growth, increased body fat mass and elevated systolic blood pressure. Young children who are tall for their age at diagnosis and treated with cranial irradiation have the highest risk of impaired growth after the diagnosis. High doses of 6-MP seem to contribute significantly to growth retardation during therapy.
PubMed ID
8544798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Etiology of severe short stature below -3 SDS in a screened Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304347
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2020 Nov; 183(5):481-488
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Juho Kärkinen
Päivi J Miettinen
Taneli Raivio
Matti Hero
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, Pediatric Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2020 Nov; 183(5):481-488
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Dwarfism - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Growth Charts
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Syndrome
Abstract
To describe the etiology of severe short stature in the Helsinki University Hospital district covering a population of 1.2 million that is subject to frequent growth monitoring and screening rules during childhood.
Retrospective cohort study.
We identified all subjects born 1990 or later with a height SD score
PubMed ID
33107436 View in PubMed
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Growth in infancy and childhood in girls with Turner's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36960
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Dec;80(12):1158-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
J. Karlberg
K. Albertsson-Wikland
K O Nilsson
E M Ritzén
O. Westphal
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Dec;80(12):1158-65
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Models, Biological
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Turner Syndrome - complications
Abstract
We describe spontaneous longitudinal growth in girls with Turner's syndrome (TS), using the infancy-childhood-puberty (ICP) growth model. Length/height during the first 12 years of life was studied in 58 Swedish girls with TS. Their mean length at birth was 47.8 cm (SDS -1.4) and mean height at 12.0 years of age 127.3 cm (SDS -3.0). A clear age-dependent subnormality was observed in the change in length-height SDS (delta SDS). Mean delta SDS values at ages 0.0 to 0.5 and 3.0 to 6.0 years were normal. In contrast, the mean delta SDS at ages 0.5 to 3.0 and 6.0 to 12.0 years were subnormal. The onset of the childhood growth component (normally located between 0.5 and 1.0 year of age) was, on the average, delayed by 0.28 year. This accounts for the subnormality of delta SDS at 0.5 to 3.0 years of age. About 50% of the variation in height at 12.0 years of age, as determined by a multiple linear regression analysis, was significantly explained by length at 0.5 year of age, age at the onset of the childhood component, and delta SDS at 6.0 to 12.0 years of age.
PubMed ID
1785288 View in PubMed
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The impact of feeding problems on growth and energy intake in children with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37016
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Oct;45(10):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
M. Thommessen
B F Kase
G. Riis
A. Heiberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nutrition Research, School of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Oct;45(10):479-87
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Energy intake
Female
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Retrospective data on growth and cross-sectional data on growth outcome, anthropometric measurements and energy intake have been analysed according to the presence or absence of feeding problems in 42 children with cerebral palsy (CP) between 1 and 13 years of age. The mean age for boys and girls was 5.1 and 5.9 years, respectively. The study revealed a high frequency of feeding problems (50%) and growth retardation (48%) in the group. The results of weight for height, triceps skinfold thickness and energy intake indicate that 15% of the children were undernourished at the time of study. The cross-sectional analyses showed that children with feeding problems at the time of study (n = 22) had significantly lower height for age, weight for height, triceps skinfold thickness and upper-arm circumference than children without problems (P less than 0.05). Children with feeding problems also tended to have lower energy intake, but the differences were not significant. The feeding problems were most frequent among the severely disabled children. This study has shown that the presence of feeding problems is one important predictor of low growth outcome in children with CP. When parents report on feeding problems, feeding evaluation, training and nutritional intervention should be offered immediately. This is important for alleviating the heavy care-load for parents and health-workers and for some children it may be necessary to maintain an acceptable nutritional state.
PubMed ID
1782919 View in PubMed
Less detail

Longitudinal growth in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35919
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1994 Feb;18(2):165-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
H. Hildebrand
J. Karlberg
B. Kristiansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics I, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1994 Feb;18(2):165-73
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - physiopathology
Crohn Disease - physiopathology
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - physiopathology - therapy
Longitudinal Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Weight and height were followed longitudinally from birth to adulthood in children with inflammatory bowel disease living in a defined area of Sweden, 1983 through 1987; 124 children out of a possible 128 were studied. During the year preceding diagnosis, height growth velocity was significantly reduced in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. At the time of diagnosis, weight-for-height was subnormal in both children with ulcerative colitis (p
PubMed ID
8014763 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal fish oil supplementation during lactation is associated with reduced height at 13 years of age and higher blood pressure in boys only.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282574
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Dec;116(12):2082-2090
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
L. Lauritzen
S E Eriksen
M F Hjorth
M S Nielsen
S F Olsen
K D Stark
K F Michaelsen
C T Damsgaard
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Dec;116(12):2082-2090
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Adult
Body Height
Child
Child Development
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Female
Fish Oils - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Lactation
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prehypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Puberty, Delayed - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Seafood
Sex Factors
Abstract
Dietary long-chain n-3 PUFA (n-3 LCPUFA) in infancy may have long-term effects on lifestyle disease risk. The present follow-up study investigated whether maternal fish oil (FO) supplementation during lactation affected growth and blood pressure in adolescents and whether the effects differed between boys and girls. Mother-infant pairs (n 103) completed a randomised controlled trial with FO (1·5 g/d n-3 LCPUFA) or olive oil (OO) supplements during the first 4 months of lactation; forty-seven mother-infant pairs with high fish intake were followed-up for 4 months as the reference group. We also followed-up 100 children with assessment of growth, blood pressure, diet by FFQ and physical activity by 7-d accelerometry at 13·5 (sd 0·4) years of age. Dried whole-blood fatty acid composition was analysed in a subgroup (n 49). At 13 years of age, whole-blood n-3 LCPUFA, diet, physical activity and body composition did not differ between the three groups. The children from the FO group were 3·4 (95 % CI 0·2, 6·6) cm shorter (P=0·035) than those from the OO group, and tended to have less advanced puberty (P=0·068), which explained the difference in height. There was a sex-specific effect on diastolic blood pressure (P sex×group=0·020), which was driven by a 3·9 (95 % CI 0·2, 7·5) mmHg higher diastolic blood pressure in the FO compared with the OO group among boys only (P=0·041). Our results indicate that early n-3 LCPUFA intake may reduce height in early adolescence due to a delay in pubertal maturation and increase blood pressure specifically in boys, thereby tending to counteract existing sex differences.
PubMed ID
28065179 View in PubMed
Less detail

Overweight with concurrent stunting in very young children from rural Mexico: prevalence and associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166307
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 May;61(5):623-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
L C Fernald
L M Neufeld
Author Affiliation
Community Health and Human Development, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 May;61(5):623-32
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height - physiology
Child
Child Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Mexico - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight
Poverty
Prevalence
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Abstract
To document the prevalence of overweight or obesity concurrent with stunting in rural low-income Mexican children and to identify demographic and socio-economic characteristics that could help identify families at risk of having an overweight/obese and stunted young child in this population.
Cross-sectional analysis of the nutritional status of very young children, using primary data from a rural community-based survey conducted in 2003. Overweight, obesity and stunting were documented along with several maternal, household and community characteristics.
Impoverished areas of rural Mexico.
Pre-school children (n=7555), aged 24-72 months.
The combined prevalence of overweight and obesity was equal to or greater than 20% in all children, as was the prevalence of stunting. The prevalence of concurrent overweight or obesity and stunting was approximately 5% in non-indigenous children, and over 10% in indigenous children 24-60 months. A multinomial logistic analysis revealed that the factors associated with coexisting stunting and overweight/obesity were lower socio-economic status (SES), lower maternal age, education, intelligence (vocabulary) and perceived social status, shorter maternal height, and larger household size. Among only stunted children, the risk of also being overweight or obese was associated with younger maternal age (relative risk ratios (RRR): 0.98, P=0.05), lower maternal perceived social status (RRR: 0.95, P
PubMed ID
17136036 View in PubMed
Less detail

Skeletal Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children: permanent consequences and health-related quality of life in long-term survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160525
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2008 Mar;50(3):607-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Loretta M S Lau
Kyra Stuurman
Sheila Weitzman
Author Affiliation
Division of Haematology/Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2008 Mar;50(3):607-12
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bone Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Child
Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic - epidemiology - etiology
Emotions
Esthetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Histiocytosis, Langerhans-Cell - classification - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Learning Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Organ Specificity
Psychology
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The skeleton is the most frequently involved organ in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in children, and bone LCH generally has an excellent long-term survival. Although permanent consequences (PC) are described in half of the survivors thus raising concerns for quality of life (QOL), the impact on quality of life has not been formally studied.
A retrospective review was performed on 124 LCH patients with skeletal involvement, followed by prospective evaluation of PC and health-related QOL using age-appropriate validated study tools (PedsQL or SF-36).
Of the 116 survivors, PC were found in 34 (29%) patients, of whom 8 had more than 1 PC. PC were significantly more frequent in multi-system (M-S) than in single system (S-S) LCH (73% vs. 17%; P
PubMed ID
17973322 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.