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38 records – page 1 of 4.

Accumulation and depuration of the synthetic antioxidant ethoxyquin in the muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86374
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 May;46(5):1834-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Bohne Victoria J Berdikova
Lundebye Anne-Katrine
Hamre Kristin
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Nordnes, Bergen, Norway. victoria.bohne@nifes.no
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 May;46(5):1834-43
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Algorithms
Animal Feed - analysis
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Body Weight - drug effects
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diet
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethoxyquin - metabolism
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Lipids - analysis
Mice
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - metabolism
Norway
Salmo salar - metabolism
Abstract
The biological fate of the fish feed additive, ethoxyquin (EQ) was examined in the muscle of Atlantic salmon during 12 weeks of feeding followed by a 2 weeks depuration period. Parent EQ (1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline), quinone imine (2,6-dihydro-2,2,4-trimethyl-6-quinolone), de-ethylated EQ (6-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline) and EQDM (EQ dimer or 1,8'-di(1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-quinoline) were found to be the ubiquitous metabolites of dietary EQ, with EQDM as a main metabolite. A rapid decrease in the level of EQ (2.4 days of half-life) was balanced by an increase in EQDM, giving an unchanged net sum following 2 weeks of depuration. The mandatory 14 days depuration period prior to slaughtering of farmed salmon in Norway was not sufficient for complete elimination of EQ-derived residuals. Post depuration, EQDM accounted for 99% of sum of the two compounds in all treatment groups; possible toxicological effects of EQDM are not known. The individual concentrations of EQ and EQDM and their sum are dependent on EQ level in the feed, consequently, their residual concentrations may be controlled. The theoretical amount of EQ and EQDM consumed in one meal of farmed salmon would be under the recommended ADI, provided that the fish were raised on feed with no more than 150 mg EQ/kg feed, which is the EU maximum limit for EQ in fish feed.
PubMed ID
18329775 View in PubMed
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Animal protein intake, serum insulin-like growth factor I, and growth in healthy 2.5-y-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30213
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Aug;80(2):447-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Camilla Hoppe
Tina Rovenna Udam
Lotte Lauritzen
Christian Mølgaard
Anders Juul
Kim Fleischer Michaelsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition and the Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark. cho@kvl.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Aug;80(2):447-52
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Energy intake
Female
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Linear Models
Male
Meat
Milk
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies from developing countries indicate that intake of animal protein, especially of milk, is associated with greater velocity of linear growth in childhood. Whether the same association exists in industrialized countries, where protein intake is high, is not clear. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine associations between protein intake, serum insulin-like growth factor I (sIGF-I) concentrations, and height in healthy children. DESIGN: We analyzed the associations between protein intake, sIGF-I concentrations, and height in 2.5-y-old children. Diet (7-d record) and sIGF-I (radioimmunoassay) data were available from 90 children (54 boys). RESULTS: The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of protein intake were 2.4, 2.9, and 4.0 g. kg(-1). d(-1), respectively; 63% was animal protein. In multiple linear regressions with adjustment for sex and weight, height (cm) was positively associated with intakes of animal protein (g/d) [0.10 +/- 0.038 (b +/- SE); P = 0.01] and milk (0.0047 +/- 0.002; P = 0.007), but not with those of vegetable protein or meat. The sIGF-I concentration was significantly associated with intakes of animal protein (1.4 +/- 0.53; P = 0.01) and milk (0.049 +/- 0.024; P = 0.045), but not with those of vegetable protein or meat. sIGF-I concentrations were positively associated with height (0.019 +/- 0.008; P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Milk intake was positively associated with sIGF-I concentrations and height. An increase in milk intake from 200 to 600 mL/d corresponded to a 30% increase in circulating IGF-I. This suggests that milk compounds have a stimulating effect on sIGF-I concentrations and, thereby, on growth.
PubMed ID
15277169 View in PubMed
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[Antioxidant protection and endocrine gland function in children in a petroleum industrial center].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209868
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(8):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
E V Pokshubina
E I Etkina
E G Davletov
G M Nagaeva
A R Biktasheva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(8):8-11
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anthropometry
Antioxidants - analysis
Bashkiria
Chemical Industry
Child
Child, Preschool
Endocrine Glands - drug effects
Female
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Petroleum - adverse effects
Urban Population
Abstract
The article presents data on influence of technogenic environmental pollution and parents' occupational hazards on sex-matched physical development of preschoolers, their endocrine balance and antioxidant system. The identified features of physical development, endocrine state and antioxidant system prove higher sensitivity of girls to chemical hazards. Significance of the studied parameters necessitate their use in biologic and ecologic monitoring.
PubMed ID
9377059 View in PubMed
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Attenuated growth of breast-fed children exposed to increased concentrations of methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186651
Source
FASEB J. 2003 Apr;17(6):699-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Philippe Grandjean
Esben Budtz-Jørgensen
Ulrike Steuerwald
Birger Heinzow
Larry L Needham
Poul J Jørgensen
Pál Weihe
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. pgrand@health.sdu.dk
Source
FASEB J. 2003 Apr;17(6):699-701
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Breast Feeding
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Methylmercury Compounds - adverse effects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Breast-feeding has been linked to slowed postnatal growth. Although the basis for this "weanling's dilemma" is unclear, environmental contaminants in human milk may be of relevance. We studied a Faroese birth cohort of 182 singleton children, born at term in 1994-95. Concentrations of mercury in cord blood and of polychlorinated biphenyls in maternal milk were measured, and duration of breast-feeding was recorded. At 18 months, children who had been exclusively breast-fed for at least 6 months weighed 0.59 kg less [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.03, 1.16 kg] and were 1.50 cm [95% CI = 0.52, 2.47 cm] shorter than those not breast-fed. However, calculated transfer of contaminants from human milk fully explained the attenuated growth. Irrespective of duration of breast-feeding, a doubling of the mercury concentration in cord blood was associated with a decrease in weight at 18 months by 0.19 kg (95% CI = 0.03, 0.35 kg) and in height by 0.26 cm (95% CI = -0.02, 0.55 cm). Weight and height at 42 months showed the same tendencies, but the main effect occurred before 18 months of age. Thus, in communities with increased contaminant exposures, risks associated with lactational transfer of toxicants to the infant must be considered when judging the benefits of prolonged breast-feeding.
PubMed ID
12586743 View in PubMed
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[Children's health in the petroleum region of the Republic of Tatarstan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188778
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
R F Khakimova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):59-61
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced
Child
Child, Preschool
Digestive System Diseases - chemically induced
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Growth - drug effects - physiology
Health status
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Male
Petroleum
Russia
Abstract
The paper provides a comprehensive assessment of the ecological situation of the most polluted town of the petroleum region. In-depth studies were made in 309 children aged 4-6 years from 4 children's preschool establishments. It was found that only 37.5% of the preschool children were apparently healthy, allergic diseases were detected in 27.2% of the children, cardiovascular ones were found in 18.8% of the examinees. Eighteen of the 309 children were classified as frequently ill. The physical development of children in the polluted area was less than that in the controls.
PubMed ID
12198910 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and factors affecting growth in long-term survivors of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22749
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
K K Talvensaari
M. Knip
P. Lanning
M. Lanning
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 1996 Mar;26(3):166-72
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
6-Mercaptopurine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Cranial Irradiation - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth - drug effects - radiation effects
Growth Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survivors
Abstract
We evaluated clinical characteristics and growth in 51 (24 males) long-term survivors of childhood cancer (median follow up 12.7 years). Patients were shorter, had a higher proportion of body fat and higher systolic blood pressure than their controls. The change in relative height during treatment was -0.83 standard deviation score (S.D.S.) in patients with cranial irradiation and -0.32 S.D.S. in patients without cranial irradiation; the figures after treatment were -0.56 and 0.20 S.D.S., respectively. Half (r2 = 0.50) of the variation in growth retardation during therapy could be explained by the cumulative doses of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and vincristine and relative height at diagnosis. Cranial irradiation, increased relative height at diagnosis and young age at diagnosis were significant predictors of growth failure over the total observation period, explaining 43% of the variation. We conclude that long-term survivors of childhood cancer have impaired linear growth, increased body fat mass and elevated systolic blood pressure. Young children who are tall for their age at diagnosis and treated with cranial irradiation have the highest risk of impaired growth after the diagnosis. High doses of 6-MP seem to contribute significantly to growth retardation during therapy.
PubMed ID
8544798 View in PubMed
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[Dynamics of the physical development of schoolchildren under varying environmental pollution conditions in light of the problem acceleration].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247368
Source
Gig Sanit. 1979 Apr;(4):62-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1979

[Effect of atmospheric pollutants on the health of infants in the 1st year of life]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60565
Source
Gig Sanit. 1980 Jul;(7):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1980

Effect of conventional dose growth hormone therapy for two years on height velocity and height prognosis in girls with Turner syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222142
Source
Horm Res. 1993;39 Suppl 2:3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H L Lenko
A. Hakulinen
M L Käär
J. Mäenpää
A L Mäkelä
I. Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Horm Res. 1993;39 Suppl 2:3-6
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - drug effects
Bone Development - drug effects
Child
Estradiol - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Fluoxymesterone - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Growth - drug effects
Growth Hormone - pharmacology - secretion - therapeutic use
Humans
Pituitary Gland - drug effects - secretion
Prognosis
Turner Syndrome - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Abstract
The aims of this national multicentre study in Finland were to evaluate whether the height velocity of patients with Turner syndrome would increase with the conventional human growth hormone (GH) therapy regimen normally given to GH-deficient children and whether girls with Turner syndrome actually show GH neurosecretory dysfunction. Finally, the study should show whether GH therapy improves height prognosis and, eventually, final height. Twenty-five girls with Turner syndrome, aged 7.5-14.4 years, entered the study. Their ability to secrete GH was determined and, surprisingly, several would have been classified as having GH deficiency. All girls received GH, 0.1 IU/kg/day (maximum dose 4 IU/day) s.c., and once over 12.5 years old, they also received oestradiol valerate and fluoxymesterone. They showed a convincing increase in height velocity, and rapid growth continued during the second year of therapy. The effect of GH therapy on final height is still unknown. The therapy was remarkably free of side-effects.
PubMed ID
8395455 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.