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304 records – page 1 of 31.

Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
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Accuracy, consensus, in-group bias, and cultural frame shifting in the context of national character stereotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104583
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan-Erik Lönnqvist
Kenn Konstabel
Nellystiina Lönnqvist
Markku Verkasalo
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Character
Consensus
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Finland
Group Processes
Humans
Male
Multilingualism
Prejudice - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Stereotyping
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
We examined Finns' and bilingual Swedish-Finns' stereotypes regarding personality differences between Finns and Swedish-Finns and compared them with their respective self-ratings. Stereotype ratings by both groups converged on depicting Swedish-Finns as having a more desirable personality. In-group bias also influenced stereotypes. Contrary to predictions based on the Stereotype Content Model, out-group stereotypes were not compensatory. Consistent with the kernel of truth hypothesis of national stereotypes, Swedish-Finns' aggregate self-ratings resembled their stereotype of personality differences between the two groups, and their personality self-ratings were more desirable than Finns' self-ratings. Tentatively suggesting the occurrence of cultural frame shifting, the resemblance between Swedish-Finns' self-ratings and their stereotype of Swedish-Finns was, although only marginally statistically significantly, somewhat stronger when the self-ratings were provided in Swedish.
PubMed ID
24689336 View in PubMed
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Achieving clinical improvement: an interdisciplinary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187771
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Diane M Irvine Doran
G Ross Baker
Michael Murray
John Bohnen
Catherine Zahn
Souraya Sidani
Jennifer Carryer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Group Processes
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - standards
Problem Solving
Staff Development
Total Quality Management
Abstract
This study evaluates whether training health care teams in continuous quality improvement methods results in improvements in the care of and outcomes for patients. Nine of the 25 teams who participated in the study were successful in improving the care/outcomes for patients. Successful teams were more effective at problem solving, engaged in more functional group interactions, and were more likely to have physician participation.
PubMed ID
12433246 View in PubMed
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Acting on a living will: a physician's dilemma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211004
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 1;155(7):893-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
M. Gordon
D. Levitt
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, North York, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 1;155(7):893-5
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Chronic Disease
Combined Modality Therapy
Dissent and Disputes
Ethics Committees
Ethics Committees, Clinical
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia, Passive - psychology
Fatal Outcome
Group Processes
Humans
Living Wills - psychology
Male
Moral Obligations
Personal Autonomy
Quadriplegia - complications - psychology - therapy
Social Values
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The implementation of a living will can give rise to ethical dilemmas for the patient's family and the health care professionals involved. The case reported here raises questions about the right of patients to self-determination, the importance of quality-of-life considerations in treatment decisions and physicians' obligations with respect to the implementation of living wills. Physicians should ensure in advance that the instructions set out in a living will are unambiguous and should bring to the patient's attention any ethical difficulties that they foresee in carrying out those instructions.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1972 Apr 1;1(7753):734-74111204
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Jun;43(6):716-77775737
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Oct 10;264(14):1846-532402044
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Mar 28;324(13):882-82000110
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 1;146(11):1937-441596842
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1992 Aug 1;117(3):254-61616221
Cites: Med J Aust. 1993 Apr 5;158(7):460-48469195
Cites: Br J Hosp Med. 1993 Apr 21-May 4;49(8):576-88508244
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 Jan 24;154(2):209-178285816
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Mar;42(3):303-78120316
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 1;151(3):285-98039081
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Sep;42(9):997-10037503822
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Mar 1;122(5):368-747847649
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Mar 1;122(5):377-87847651
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Apr 24;155(8):793-67717786
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Jun;43(6):696-7017775732
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Nov 3;262(17):2415-92795827
PubMed ID
8837536 View in PubMed
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Agreement between professions on ethical decisions: an empirical demonstration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216289
Source
Med Law. 1995;14(3-4):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
M. Silberfeld
M. Finstad
D. Stephens
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Law. 1995;14(3-4):191-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Decision Making
Ethics Committees
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Judgment
Male
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Ontario
Social Values
Abstract
The decisions of a multidisciplinary competency panel at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Canada, were studied to try to explain the high level of agreement on individual cases when determining mental capacity. The panel assessed its own judgments on a standardized form developed to capture the process of coming to a capacity determination. Though the relative weights given to decision-making variables varied with discipline, there was agreement on a group of criteria most relevant to capacity. Three alternative explanations are given for these results.
PubMed ID
8524000 View in PubMed
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Analytic versus systemic group therapy for women with a history of child sexual abuse: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259757
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Henriette Elkjaer
Ellids Kristensen
Erik L Mortensen
Stig Poulsen
Marianne Lau
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interpersonal Relations
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
This randomized prospective study examines durability of improvement in general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and interpersonal problems, and compares the long-term efficacy of analytic and systemic group psychotherapy in women 1 year after completion of treatment for childhood sexual abuse.
Women (n = 106) randomly assigned to analytic or systemic psychotherapy completed the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Global Assessment of Functioning, Global Life Quality, Registration Chart Questionnaire, and Flashback Registration at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 1-year follow-up.
Post-treatment gains were significant for both treatment modalities on all measures, but significantly larger after systemic therapy. Significant treatment response was maintained 1-year post-treatment, but different trajectories were observed: 1 year after treatment completion, improvements for analytic therapy were maintained, whereas they decreased after systemic therapy, resulting in no statistically significant difference in gains between the groups at the 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining significant gains, more than half of the patients remained above cut-off for caseness concerning general symptomatology at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up.
The findings stress the importance of long-term follow-up data in effect studies. Different trajectories were associated with the two treatments, but improvement in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly at the 1-year follow-up. Implications of the difference in trajectories for treatment planning are discussed.
Both analytic and systemic group therapy proved efficient in improving general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, and interpersonal problems in women with a history of CSA and gains were maintained at a 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining statistically significant gains at the 1-year follow-up, 54% of the patients remained above the cut-off for caseness with respect to general symptomatology, which may indicate a need for further treatment. Different pre-post follow-up treatment trajectories were observed between the two treatment modalities. Thus, while systemic group therapy showed a significantly better outcome immediately after termination, gains in the systemic treatment group decreased during follow-up, while gains were maintained during follow-up in analytic group therapy.
PubMed ID
24014477 View in PubMed
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Augmenting health care failure modes and effects analysis with simulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257816
Source
Simul Healthc. 2014 Feb;9(1):48-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ditte S Nielsen
Peter Dieckmann
Marlene Mohr
Anja U Mitchell
Doris Østergaard
Author Affiliation
From the Danish Institute for Medical Simulation (D.S.N., P.D., M.M., D.O.), and Department of Anesthesia (A.U.M.), Herlev Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen. Denmark.
Source
Simul Healthc. 2014 Feb;9(1):48-55
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breech Presentation - therapy
Denmark
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Patient care team
Patient Safety
Patient Simulation
Pregnancy
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
This study explores whether simulation plays a role in health care failure mode and effects analysis (HFMEA); it does this by evaluating whether additional data are found when a traditional HFMEA is augmented with simulation. Two multidisciplinary teams identified vulnerabilities in a process by brainstorming, followed by simulation. Two means of adding simulation were investigated as follows: just simulating the process and interrupting the simulation between substeps of the process. By adding simulation to a traditional HFMEA, both multidisciplinary teams identified additional data that were relevant for deeper analysis. The study indicates that simulation has a role in HFMEA. Both ways of using simulation seemed feasible, and our results are not conclusive in selecting one over the other.
PubMed ID
24492339 View in PubMed
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Authoring experience: the significance and performance of storytelling in Socratic dialogue with rehabilitating cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279246
Source
Med Health Care Philos. 2015 Aug;18(3):409-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard Knox
Mette Nordahl Svendsen
Source
Med Health Care Philos. 2015 Aug;18(3):409-20
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Denmark
Group Processes
Humans
Narration
Neoplasms - psychology - rehabilitation
Philosophy, Medical
Psychodrama - methods
Resilience, Psychological
Self-Assessment
Abstract
This article examines the storytelling aspect in philosophizing with rehabilitating cancer patients in small Socratic dialogue groups (SDG). Recounting an experience to illustrate a philosophical question chosen by the participants is the traditional point of departure for the dialogical exchange. However, narrating is much more than a beginning point or the skeletal framework of events and it deserves more scholarly attention than hitherto given. Storytelling pervades the whole Socratic process and impacts the conceptual analysis in a SDG. In this article we show how the narrative aspect became a rich resource for the compassionate bond between participants and how their stories cultivated the abstract reflection in the group. In addition, the aim of the article is to reveal the different layers in the performance of storytelling, or of authoring experience. By picking, poking and dissecting an experience through a collaborative effort, most participants had their initial experience existentially refined and the chosen concept of which the experience served as an illustration transformed into a moral compass to be used in self-orientation post cancer.
PubMed ID
25894237 View in PubMed
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Balint groups as a means to increase job satisfaction and prevent burnout among general practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87054
Source
Ann Fam Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;6(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kjeldmand Dorte
Holmström Inger
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section for Health Services Research, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. dorte.kjeldmand@lj.se
Source
Ann Fam Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;6(2):138-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family - psychology
Psychoanalytic Therapy
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: General practitioners (GPs) occupy a central position in health care and often have demanding working situations. This corps shows signs of exhaustion, and many consider quitting their job or plan to retire early. It is therefore urgent to find ways of improving GP's satisfaction with their work. One approach might be Balint group participation. The aim of this study was to explore GPs' experience of participating in Balint groups and its influence on their work life. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive, qualitative study. Nine GPs who had participated in Balint groups for 3 to 15 years were interviewed. A phenomenologic analysis was carried out to describe the phenomenon of Balint group participation. RESULTS: The GPs perceived that their Balint group participation influenced their work life. Analyses revealed several interrelating themes: competence, professional identity, and a sense of security, which increased through parallel processes, creating a base of endurance and satisfaction, thus enabling the GPs to rediscover the joy of being a physician. CONCLUSIONS: The GPs in this study described their Balint group participation as beneficial and essential to their work life as physicians in several ways. It seemed to increase their competence in patient encounters and enabled them to endure in their job and find joy and challenge in their relationships with patients. Balint groups might thus help GPs handle a demanding work life and prevent burnout. These groups might not suit all GPs, however, and additional ways to reduce stress and increase job satisfaction should be offered.
PubMed ID
18332406 View in PubMed
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Basic life support refresher training of nurses: individual training and group training are equally effective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92566
Source
Resuscitation. 2008 Nov;79(2):283-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
De Regge Melissa
Calle Paul A
De Paepe Peter
Monsieurs Koenraad G
Author Affiliation
Critical Care Department, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Source
Resuscitation. 2008 Nov;79(2):283-7
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Clinical Competence
Education, Nursing - methods
Education, Professional, Retraining - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Group Processes
Guideline Adherence
Heart Arrest - nursing
Humans
Male
Manikins
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Basic life support (BLS) skills of hospital nurses are often poor. We compared individual BLS refresher training (IT; one instructor to one trainee) with group refresher training (GT; one instructor to six trainees). We hypothesised that IT would result in better skill acquisition and retention. METHODS: Nurses from non-critical care wards (n=120) were randomised to IT or GT. Skills were assessed by a 3 min BLS test on a computerised manikin (Laerdal, Norway) immediately before training (T0), immediately after training (T1), and 10 months after training (T2). Results are expressed as median and [interquartile range]. RESULTS: The study was completed by 103 nurses (IT 56, GT 47). For GT the median group size was 5 [4-5]. The median duration of IT was 20 [17-21] min. The median duration of GT was 90 [84-95] or 19 min per trainee. Baseline skills did not differ between GT and IT, except for less compressions with correct depth for IT. At T1 and T2 there were no clinically significant differences between GT and IT for number of ventilations, ventilation volume, number of compressions, compression depth, compression rate and hands off time. Total instructor time was similar for IT and GT training strategies. CONCLUSIONS: There was no difference in IT and GT immediately and 10 months after training. However, training time per nurse for IT was only one fifth, whereas total instructor time did not increase. Although not superior in outcome, IT may be a cost-effective alternative for GT.
PubMed ID
18691799 View in PubMed
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304 records – page 1 of 31.