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312 records – page 1 of 32.

Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
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Accuracy, consensus, in-group bias, and cultural frame shifting in the context of national character stereotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104583
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan-Erik Lönnqvist
Kenn Konstabel
Nellystiina Lönnqvist
Markku Verkasalo
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Character
Consensus
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Finland
Group Processes
Humans
Male
Multilingualism
Prejudice - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Stereotyping
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
We examined Finns' and bilingual Swedish-Finns' stereotypes regarding personality differences between Finns and Swedish-Finns and compared them with their respective self-ratings. Stereotype ratings by both groups converged on depicting Swedish-Finns as having a more desirable personality. In-group bias also influenced stereotypes. Contrary to predictions based on the Stereotype Content Model, out-group stereotypes were not compensatory. Consistent with the kernel of truth hypothesis of national stereotypes, Swedish-Finns' aggregate self-ratings resembled their stereotype of personality differences between the two groups, and their personality self-ratings were more desirable than Finns' self-ratings. Tentatively suggesting the occurrence of cultural frame shifting, the resemblance between Swedish-Finns' self-ratings and their stereotype of Swedish-Finns was, although only marginally statistically significantly, somewhat stronger when the self-ratings were provided in Swedish.
PubMed ID
24689336 View in PubMed
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Achieving clinical improvement: an interdisciplinary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187771
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Diane M Irvine Doran
G Ross Baker
Michael Murray
John Bohnen
Catherine Zahn
Souraya Sidani
Jennifer Carryer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Group Processes
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - standards
Problem Solving
Staff Development
Total Quality Management
Abstract
This study evaluates whether training health care teams in continuous quality improvement methods results in improvements in the care of and outcomes for patients. Nine of the 25 teams who participated in the study were successful in improving the care/outcomes for patients. Successful teams were more effective at problem solving, engaged in more functional group interactions, and were more likely to have physician participation.
PubMed ID
12433246 View in PubMed
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Acting on a living will: a physician's dilemma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211004
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 1;155(7):893-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
M. Gordon
D. Levitt
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, North York, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 1;155(7):893-5
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Chronic Disease
Combined Modality Therapy
Dissent and Disputes
Ethics Committees
Ethics Committees, Clinical
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia, Passive - psychology
Fatal Outcome
Group Processes
Humans
Living Wills - psychology
Male
Moral Obligations
Personal Autonomy
Quadriplegia - complications - psychology - therapy
Social Values
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The implementation of a living will can give rise to ethical dilemmas for the patient's family and the health care professionals involved. The case reported here raises questions about the right of patients to self-determination, the importance of quality-of-life considerations in treatment decisions and physicians' obligations with respect to the implementation of living wills. Physicians should ensure in advance that the instructions set out in a living will are unambiguous and should bring to the patient's attention any ethical difficulties that they foresee in carrying out those instructions.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1972 Apr 1;1(7753):734-74111204
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Jun;43(6):716-77775737
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Oct 10;264(14):1846-532402044
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Mar 28;324(13):882-82000110
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 1;146(11):1937-441596842
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1992 Aug 1;117(3):254-61616221
Cites: Med J Aust. 1993 Apr 5;158(7):460-48469195
Cites: Br J Hosp Med. 1993 Apr 21-May 4;49(8):576-88508244
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 Jan 24;154(2):209-178285816
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Mar;42(3):303-78120316
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 1;151(3):285-98039081
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Sep;42(9):997-10037503822
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Mar 1;122(5):368-747847649
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Mar 1;122(5):377-87847651
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Apr 24;155(8):793-67717786
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Jun;43(6):696-7017775732
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Nov 3;262(17):2415-92795827
PubMed ID
8837536 View in PubMed
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Agreement between professions on ethical decisions: an empirical demonstration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216289
Source
Med Law. 1995;14(3-4):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
M. Silberfeld
M. Finstad
D. Stephens
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Med Law. 1995;14(3-4):191-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Decision Making
Ethics Committees
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Judgment
Male
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Ontario
Social Values
Abstract
The decisions of a multidisciplinary competency panel at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Canada, were studied to try to explain the high level of agreement on individual cases when determining mental capacity. The panel assessed its own judgments on a standardized form developed to capture the process of coming to a capacity determination. Though the relative weights given to decision-making variables varied with discipline, there was agreement on a group of criteria most relevant to capacity. Three alternative explanations are given for these results.
PubMed ID
8524000 View in PubMed
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Analytic versus systemic group therapy for women with a history of child sexual abuse: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259757
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Henriette Elkjaer
Ellids Kristensen
Erik L Mortensen
Stig Poulsen
Marianne Lau
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interpersonal Relations
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
This randomized prospective study examines durability of improvement in general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and interpersonal problems, and compares the long-term efficacy of analytic and systemic group psychotherapy in women 1 year after completion of treatment for childhood sexual abuse.
Women (n = 106) randomly assigned to analytic or systemic psychotherapy completed the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Global Assessment of Functioning, Global Life Quality, Registration Chart Questionnaire, and Flashback Registration at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 1-year follow-up.
Post-treatment gains were significant for both treatment modalities on all measures, but significantly larger after systemic therapy. Significant treatment response was maintained 1-year post-treatment, but different trajectories were observed: 1 year after treatment completion, improvements for analytic therapy were maintained, whereas they decreased after systemic therapy, resulting in no statistically significant difference in gains between the groups at the 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining significant gains, more than half of the patients remained above cut-off for caseness concerning general symptomatology at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up.
The findings stress the importance of long-term follow-up data in effect studies. Different trajectories were associated with the two treatments, but improvement in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly at the 1-year follow-up. Implications of the difference in trajectories for treatment planning are discussed.
Both analytic and systemic group therapy proved efficient in improving general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, and interpersonal problems in women with a history of CSA and gains were maintained at a 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining statistically significant gains at the 1-year follow-up, 54% of the patients remained above the cut-off for caseness with respect to general symptomatology, which may indicate a need for further treatment. Different pre-post follow-up treatment trajectories were observed between the two treatment modalities. Thus, while systemic group therapy showed a significantly better outcome immediately after termination, gains in the systemic treatment group decreased during follow-up, while gains were maintained during follow-up in analytic group therapy.
PubMed ID
24014477 View in PubMed
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Appreciative inquiry in a Norwegian nursing home: a unifying and maturing process to forward new knowledge and new practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309679
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Inger-Lise Magnussen
Johanne Alteren
Terese Bondas
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences , Nord University , Bodø , Norway.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Dementia - nursing
Group Processes
Health Personnel
Humans
Knowledge
Norway
Nursing - methods
Nursing Homes
Nursing Research - methods
Research Design
Research Personnel
Abstract
Appreciative inquiry (AI) studies have proven to be useful in developing nursing knowledge and changing nursing practice. However, few AI studies have examined the meaning of participation over time among collaborating healthcare providers. Our aim was to explore and illuminate healthcare providers' participation over time in a Norwegian nursing home to develop new knowledge and practice, focusing on sensory gardens.
Twenty healthcare providers participated in the 3 year AI study. Data were collected in fieldwork, interviews, and interventions. Saldañas' longitudinal analysis was applied.
The collaboration between the researcher and participants created insight of a relational room, which was named "the room of closeness". Participants' search for new arenas to apply the meaning of the room of closeness was found when focusing on the sensory garden. Their desire for joint development created a bottom-up perspective, the hallmark of successful AI.
Knowledge of participants' experiences may contribute to developing AI as a useful and transferable method, especially regarding co-creating participation, and may have implications for research and society. AI's strength-based approach may, however, lead to the neglect of data that are associated with problems, and complicate the assessment of success. Further research is therefore needed to develop AI.
PubMed ID
30623735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appreciative inquiry in a Norwegian nursing home: a unifying and maturing process to forward new knowledge and new practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302508
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Inger-Lise Magnussen
Johanne Alteren
Terese Bondas
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences , Nord University , Bodø , Norway.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2019 Dec; 14(1):1559437
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Dementia - nursing
Group Processes
Health Personnel
Humans
Knowledge
Norway
Nursing - methods
Nursing Homes
Nursing Research - methods
Research Design
Research Personnel
Abstract
Appreciative inquiry (AI) studies have proven to be useful in developing nursing knowledge and changing nursing practice. However, few AI studies have examined the meaning of participation over time among collaborating healthcare providers. Our aim was to explore and illuminate healthcare providers' participation over time in a Norwegian nursing home to develop new knowledge and practice, focusing on sensory gardens.
Twenty healthcare providers participated in the 3 year AI study. Data were collected in fieldwork, interviews, and interventions. Saldañas' longitudinal analysis was applied.
The collaboration between the researcher and participants created insight of a relational room, which was named "the room of closeness". Participants' search for new arenas to apply the meaning of the room of closeness was found when focusing on the sensory garden. Their desire for joint development created a bottom-up perspective, the hallmark of successful AI.
Knowledge of participants' experiences may contribute to developing AI as a useful and transferable method, especially regarding co-creating participation, and may have implications for research and society. AI's strength-based approach may, however, lead to the neglect of data that are associated with problems, and complicate the assessment of success. Further research is therefore needed to develop AI.
PubMed ID
30623735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attending Heart School and long-term outcome after myocardial infarction: A decennial SWEDEHEART registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309032
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2020 01; 27(2):145-154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
John Wallert
Erik Mg Olsson
Ronnie Pingel
Fredrika Norlund
Margret Leosdottir
Gunilla Burell
Claes Held
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2020 01; 27(2):145-154
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Rehabilitation
Female
Group Processes
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Disease Risk Factors
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Patient Education as Topic
Protective factors
Registries
Risk assessment
Secondary Prevention
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The Heart School is a standard component of cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction in Sweden. The group-based educational intervention aims to improve modifiable risks, in turn reducing subsequent morbidity and mortality. However, an evaluation with respect to mortality is lacking.
Using linked population registries, we estimated the association of attending Heart School with both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, two and five years after admission for first-time myocardial infarction.
Patients with first-time myocardial infarction (99% complete follow-up in the Causes of Death registry for outcome events. Of 192,059 myocardial infarction admissions, 47,907 unique patients with first-time myocardial infarction surviving to the first cardiac rehabilitation visit constituted the study population. The exposure was attending Heart School at the first cardiac rehabilitation visit 6-10 weeks post-myocardial infarction. Data on socioeconomic status was acquired from Statistics Sweden. After multiple imputation, propensity score matching was performed. The association of exposure with mortality was estimated with Cox regression and survival curves.
After matching, attending Heart School was associated (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval)) with a markedly lower risk of both all-cause (two-year hazard ratio?=?0.53 (0.44-0.64); five-year hazard ratio?=?0.62 (0.55-0.69)) and cardiovascular (0.50 (0.38-0.65); 0.57 (0.47-0.69)) mortality. The results were robust in several sensitivity analyses.
Attending Heart School during cardiac rehabilitation is associated with almost halved all-cause and cardiovascular mortality after first-time myocardial infarction. The result warrants further investigation through adequately powered randomised trials.
Notes
CommentIn: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2020 Jan;27(2):143-144 PMID 31412716
PubMed ID
31514507 View in PubMed
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Augmenting health care failure modes and effects analysis with simulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257816
Source
Simul Healthc. 2014 Feb;9(1):48-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ditte S Nielsen
Peter Dieckmann
Marlene Mohr
Anja U Mitchell
Doris Østergaard
Author Affiliation
From the Danish Institute for Medical Simulation (D.S.N., P.D., M.M., D.O.), and Department of Anesthesia (A.U.M.), Herlev Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen. Denmark.
Source
Simul Healthc. 2014 Feb;9(1):48-55
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breech Presentation - therapy
Denmark
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Patient care team
Patient Safety
Patient Simulation
Pregnancy
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
This study explores whether simulation plays a role in health care failure mode and effects analysis (HFMEA); it does this by evaluating whether additional data are found when a traditional HFMEA is augmented with simulation. Two multidisciplinary teams identified vulnerabilities in a process by brainstorming, followed by simulation. Two means of adding simulation were investigated as follows: just simulating the process and interrupting the simulation between substeps of the process. By adding simulation to a traditional HFMEA, both multidisciplinary teams identified additional data that were relevant for deeper analysis. The study indicates that simulation has a role in HFMEA. Both ways of using simulation seemed feasible, and our results are not conclusive in selecting one over the other.
PubMed ID
24492339 View in PubMed
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312 records – page 1 of 32.