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An international comparison: American and Swedish dental students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74519
Source
J Dent Educ. 1978 Dec;42(12):652-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1978
Author
J A Coombs
Source
J Dent Educ. 1978 Dec;42(12):652-8
Date
Dec-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Comparative Study
Education
Family
Female
Geriatric Dentistry
Group Practice, Dental
Humans
Male
Motivation
Occupations
Professional Practice
Specialties, Dental
State Dentistry
Students, Dental
Sweden
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
It is interesting and often useful to compare and contrast individuals from different countries who decide on careers in dentistry. Such data can help provide a broadened perspective from which inferences about future patterns of specialization and distribution of manpower in America may be made. This study compares the backgrounds and plans for dental practice of dental students in the United States and Sweden. The similarities that American and Swedish dental students share relate to strong parental influence, time of decision to attend dental school, origins in urbanized areas, interest in direct patient care, uncertainty about specialty training, and a lack of prior health-related experience among males in both countries. The differences in the dental students of the two nations are more pervasive and may be explained in part by the ways the two countries have organized and financed dental education and dental care.
PubMed ID
281384 View in PubMed
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The Assiniboine dental group practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255220
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1972 Dec;38(12):449-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1972

[Better practice administration--an important part of dental health service]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75979
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1968 Feb;78(2):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1968
Author
B. Maehlum
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1968 Feb;78(2):87-92
Date
Feb-1968
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dental Prophylaxis
Economics, Dental
Education, Dental
Group Practice, Dental
Practice Management, Dental
PubMed ID
5244352 View in PubMed
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Current status of group dental practice in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236731
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1986 Aug;52(8):663-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1986

Decision criteria and characteristics of Norwegian general dental practitioners selecting digital radiography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52328
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 2001 Jul;30(4):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
A. Wenzel
A. Møystad
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, Royal Dental College, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 2001 Jul;30(4):197-202
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Choice Behavior
Computer Systems - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Decision Making
Female
General Practice, Dental
Group Practice, Dental
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Private Practice
Questionnaires
Radiation Dosage
Radiography, Dental, Digital
Radiology Information Systems
Sex Factors
Time Factors
X-Ray Film
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate Norwegian general dental practitioners' decision criteria and characteristics for choosing digital radiographic equipment. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all dental practitioners in Norway (n = 3940). They were categorised on the basis of their responses as either a 'digital radiography' (DR) or 'non-digital radiography' (non-DR) dentist. Demographic, clinical, and electronic technology variables were recorded. Dentists ranked on a six-point scale their reasons for choosing or not choosing digital radiography. Their responses were analysed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-nine dentists (56%) replied. Three hundred and nine (14%), (219 men, 86 women and four not stated) had chosen to use digital radiography. The logistic regression analysis revealed that gender, age and years in dentistry were not significant factors in determining their decision, whereas working in a private or group practice was. The number of computers in the practice was the most important of the electronic technology variables. The non-DR dentists strongly agreed that 'digital radiography is too expensive' and were 'satisfied with film'. The DR dentists strongly agreed that the 'use of chemicals can be avoided', 'patient dose is reduced', and 'archiving is facilitated'. CONCLUSION: Working in a private or group practice or using multiple computers were significant factors in choosing digital radiography.
PubMed ID
11681480 View in PubMed
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Dental education and early careers of Canadian dentists: changes in attitudes, aspirations, and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248143
Source
J Dent Educ. 1978 Nov;42(11):618-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1978
Author
A E Reid
Source
J Dent Educ. 1978 Nov;42(11):618-22
Date
Nov-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aspirations (Psychology)
Attitude
Behavior
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Dental Care
Dental Hygienists - utilization
Dentists
Education, Dental
Female
Group Practice, Dental
Humans
Insurance, Dental
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Partnership Practice, Dental
Professional Practice - organization & administration
Students, Dental
Abstract
Longitudinal data on two cohorts of Canadian dental students are examined in order to determine the nature of the changes in attitudes and aspirations which students experience during their undergraduate dental training and the extent to which attitudes and aspirations which students hold on graduation are consistent with subsequent attitudes and behavior in practice. Data are presented on three dimensions of career-related attitudes and behavior: (1) aspirations toward and actual involvement in alternative practice settings, (2) attitudes and behavior related to selected professional and community activities, and (3) attitudes toward specific issues in dentistry. The results indicate that the dental school has little influence on students for the dimensions considered and suggest that analysis of both student backgrounds and the early practice experience of dental graduates may be the key to understanding the career behavior of dental graduates.
PubMed ID
280585 View in PubMed
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Electronic dental record use and clinical information management patterns among practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117584
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jan;144(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Titus Schleyer
Mei Song
Gregg H Gilbert
D Brad Rindal
Jeffrey L Fellows
Valeria V Gordan
Ellen Funkhouser
Author Affiliation
Center for Dental Informatics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3501 Terrace St., Suite 339, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. titus@pitt.edu
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jan;144(1):49-58
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Community-Based Participatory Research
Computer Systems - utilization
Data Mining - utilization
Dental Informatics
Dental Records - classification
Dental Research
Dentists - psychology
Diagnosis, Oral
Electronic Health Records - utilization
Female
Group Practice, Dental - organization & administration
Health Information Management
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Patient Care Planning
Practice Management, Dental - organization & administration
Private Practice - organization & administration
Radiography, Dental
Scandinavia
United States
Abstract
The growing availability of electronic data offers practitioners increased opportunities for reusing clinical data for research and quality improvement. However, relatively little is known about what clinical data practitioners keep on their computers regarding patients.
The authors conducted a web-based survey of 991 U.S. and Scandinavian practitioner-investigators (P-Is) in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network to determine the extent of their use of computers to manage clinical information; the type of patient information they kept on paper, a computer or both; and their willingness to reuse electronic dental record (EDR) data for research.
A total of 729 (73.6 percent) of 991 P-Is responded.A total of 73.8 percent of U.S. solo practitioners and 78.7 percent of group practitioners used a computer to manage some patient information, and 14.3 percent and 15.9 percent, respectively, managed all patient information on a computer. U.S. practitioners stored appointments, treatment plans, completed treatment and images electronically most frequently, and the periodontal charting, diagnosis, medical history, progress notes and the chief complaint least frequently.More than 90 percent of Scandinavian practitioners stored all information electronically.A total of 50.8 percent of all P-Is were willing to reuse EDR data for research, and 63.1 percent preferred electronic forms for data collection.
The results of this study show that the trend toward increased adoption of EDRs in the United States is continuing, potentially making more data in electronic form available for research. Participants appear to be willing to reuse EDR data for research and to collect data electronically.
The rising rates of EDR adoption may offer increased opportunities for reusing electronic data for quality improvement and research.
Notes
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Cites: Inform Prim Care. 2006;14(3):203-917288707
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2006 May-Jun;13(3):344-5216501177
Cites: J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Mar;72(2):14516545175
Cites: J Am Board Fam Med. 2006 Jan-Feb;19(1):93-716492011
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jun;136(6):728-3716022037
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Cites: BMC Oral Health. 2009;9:2619832991
PubMed ID
23283926 View in PubMed
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Group dental practice in Canada--a growing trend!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235020
Source
J Dent Pract Adm. 1987 Jul-Sep;4(3):125-9
Publication Type
Article

How do dentists perceive poverty and people on social assistance? A qualitative study conducted in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124760
Source
J Dent Educ. 2012 May;76(5):545-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Christine Loignon
Anne Landry
Paul Allison
Lucie Richard
Christophe Bedos
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada. Christine.Loignon@USherbrooke.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 2012 May;76(5):545-52
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Employment
Female
Group Practice, Dental
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Partnership Practice, Dental
Poverty
Private Practice
Public Assistance
Quebec
Stress, Psychological
Urban Population
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite significant needs, people on social assistance are sometimes reluctant to consult dentists because of previous negative experience and communication barriers. They feel poorly understood by oral health professionals and sometimes complain of being stigmatized. It is thus important to know how dentists perceive poverty and this group of patients. The aim of this study was to understand how dentists perceive poverty and people on social assistance. To investigate this largely unexplored question, a qualitative study was conducted based on in-depth interviews with thirty-three dentists practicing in Montreal, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for qualitative analysis. The study revealed two perspectives on poverty: 1) the individualistic-deficit perspective and 2) the socio-lifecourse perspective. In the individualistic-deficit perspective, which predominated among these participants, dentists explained poverty by individual factors and emphasized individuals' negative attitudes toward work and lack of capabilities. Conversely, dentists with a socio-lifecourse perspective described poverty as a structural rather than an individual process. Acknowledging individuals' distress and powerlessness, these dentists expressed more empathy toward people on social assistance. The results suggest the individualistic-deficit perspective impedes the care relationship between dentists and poor patients as well as highlighting the need to better prepare dentists for addressing issues of poverty and social inequities in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
22550100 View in PubMed
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The Indian Health Service Model From the Treatment Perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268887
Source
J Am Coll Dent. 2015;82(2):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mandie L Smith
Source
J Am Coll Dent. 2015;82(2):19-24
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Attitude of Health Personnel
Efficiency, Organizational
Group Practice, Dental - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Organizations, Nonprofit
Practice Management, Dental - organization & administration
Practice Patterns, Dentists' - organization & administration
United States
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration
Abstract
The nonprofit dental delivery model is appropriate for the needs of specific patient populations. The Indian Health Service is an example of how care can be provided where traditional fee-for-service and indemnity mechanisms may be insufficient. Separating care from management in this context gives dentists greater power over individual treatment decisions, increased choice of patient-relevant care options, and control over development of the practice model and its evolution. The needs of various populations groups and the funding or profit model inevitably influence the composition of the dental team and assignment of dental duties.
PubMed ID
26562979 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.