Skip header and navigation

Refine By

33 records – page 1 of 4.

Alcoholic liver disease patients' perspective of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention after hepatic encephalopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280012
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2016 Sep;25(17-18):2457-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Maria Rudkjaer Mikkelsen
Carsten Hendriksen
Frank Vinholt Schiødt
Susan Rydahl-Hansen
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2016 Sep;25(17-18):2457-67
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Grounded Theory
Hepatic Encephalopathy - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Abstract
To identify and describe the impact of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients after hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives.
Patients who have experienced alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy have reduced quality of life, multiple complications, and social problems, and rehabilitation opportunities for these patients are limited.
A grounded theory study and an evaluation study of a controlled intervention study.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 alcoholic liver disease patients who were diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy and participated in a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention. Richard S. Lazarus's theory of stress and coping inspired the interview guide.
The significance of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients' ability to cope with problems after surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives was characterised by the core category 'regain control over the diseased body'. This is subdivided into three separate categories: 'the experience of being physically strong', 'togetherness' and 'self-control', and they impact each other and are mutually interdependent.
Alcoholic liver disease patients described the strength of the rehabilitation as regaining control over the diseased body. Professionals and relatives of patients with alcoholic liver disease may need to focus on strengthening and preserving patients' control of their diseased body by facilitating the experience of togetherness, self-control and physical strength when interacting with and supporting patients with alcoholic liver disease.
A coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention may help alcoholic liver disease patients to regain control over their diseased body and give patients the experience of togetherness, self-control and physical strength. Professionals should be aware of giving the patients the experience of togetherness in their interactions, help them perceive self-control and gain physical strength during their rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
27256537 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assisted normality--a grounded theory of adolescent's experiences of living with personal assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279004
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2016;38(11):1053-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Lill Hultman
Ulla Forinder
Pernilla Pergert
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2016;38(11):1053-62
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology - standards
Disabled Persons - psychology
Emotional Intelligence
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Grounded Theory
Health - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to explore how adolescents with disabilities experience everyday life with personal assistants.
In this qualitative study, individual interviews were conducted at 35 occasions with 16 Swedish adolescents with disabilities, in the ages 16-21. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology.
The adolescents' main concern was to achieve normality, which is about doing rather than being normal. They try to resolve this by assisted normality utilizing personal assistance. Assisted normality can be obtained by the existing relationship, the cooperation between the assistant and the adolescent and the situational placement of the assistant. Normality is obstructed by physical, social and psychological barriers.
This study is from the adolescents' perspective and has implications for understanding the value of having access to personal assistance in order to achieve assisted normality and enable social interaction in everyday life.
Access to personal assistance is important to enable social interaction in everyday life. A good and functional relationship is enabled through the existing relation, co-operation and situational placement of the assistant. If the assistant is not properly sensitized, young people risk turning into objects of care. Access to personal assistants cannot compensate for disabling barriers in the society as for example lack of acceptance.
PubMed ID
26482646 View in PubMed
Less detail

Balancing Risk: A Grounded Theory Study of Pregnant Women's Decisions to (Dis)Continue Antidepressant Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279666
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jul;36(7):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Lene Nygaard
Camilla Blach Rossen
Niels Buus
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jul;36(7):485-92
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Decision Making
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Grounded Theory
Humans
Medication Adherence - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - psychology
Treatment Refusal - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study explored how eight pregnant women diagnosed with depression managed the decision whether or not to take antidepressants during pregnancy. In total, 11 interviews were conducted and analysed by means of constructivist grounded theory. The major category constructed was Balancing risk, with two minor categories: Assessing depression and antidepressants and Evaluating the impact of significant others. The participants tried to make the safest decision, taking all aspects of their life into consideration. They described successful decision-making in the context of managing social norms that surround pregnancy, in a way that was acceptable to themselves, their significant others and healthcare professionals.
PubMed ID
26309167 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being in a safe and thus secure place, the core of early labour: A secondary analysis in a Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282150
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:30230
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ing-Marie Carlsson
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:30230
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Decision Making
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Emotions
Female
Grounded Theory
Hospitalization
Humans
Labor Onset - psychology
Midwifery
Parturition - psychology
Patient Participation
Patient Preference - psychology
Patient Safety
Perinatal care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Early labour is the very first phase of the labour process and is considered to be a period of time when no professional attendance is needed. However there is a high frequency of women who seek care at the delivery wards during this phase. When a woman is admitted to the delivery ward, one role for midwives is to determine whether the woman is in established labour or not. If the woman is assessed as being in early labour she will probably then be advised to return home. This recommendation is made due to past research that found that the longer a woman is in hospital the higher the risk for complications for her and her child. Women have described how this situation leaves them in a vulnerable situation where their preferences are not always met and where they are not always included in the decision-making process.
The aim of this study was to generate a theory based on where a woman chooses to be during the early labour process and to increase our understanding about how experiences can differ from place to place.
The method was a secondary analysis with grounded theory. The data used in the analysis was from two qualitative interview studies and 37 transcripts.
The findings revealed a substantive theory that women needed to be in a safe and thus secure place during early labour. This theory also describes the interplay between how women ascribed their meaning of childbirth as either a natural live event or a medical one, how this influenced where they wanted to be during early labour, and how that chosen place influenced their experiences of labour and birth.
Notes
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2013 Jan;39(1):96-10422672671
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2012 Oct;68(10):2218-2822188345
Cites: Midwifery. 2013 Jan;29(1):3-922944102
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2013;8:123469988
Cites: Sex Reprod Healthc. 2013 Dec;4(4):141-624216043
Cites: Midwifery. 2013 Dec;29(12):1297-30223890679
Cites: J Clin Ethics. 2013 Fall;24(3):239-5224282851
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2014 Jan-Feb;59(1):28-3424512265
Cites: Midwifery. 2014 Mar;30(3):371-723664311
Cites: Midwifery. 2015 Mar;31(3):e58-6725480147
Cites: Birth. 2015 Sep;42(3):219-2626095829
Cites: Sex Reprod Healthc. 2015 Oct;6(3):145-5026842637
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2002 Dec;9(4):221-3812460418
Cites: Int J Nurs Pract. 2003 Feb;9(1):10-712588615
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol. 2003 Mar;23(2):118-2012745551
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1989 Jan;73(1):35-422909041
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Sep;37(6):711-78211286
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1961 Feb;17:135-4813702000
Cites: Bull Sloane Hosp Women Columbia Presbyt Med. 1962;8:77-8113895250
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;105(1):77-915625145
Cites: Nurs Sci Q. 2005 Jul;18(3):227-3215976045
Cites: Int Nurs Rev. 2006 Mar;53(1):41-616430759
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2006 Mar;92(3):217-2016434043
Cites: Women Birth. 2006 Jul;19(2):45-5016890902
Cites: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2006 Sep-Oct;51(5):347-5316945782
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Apr;25(2):172-8017600602
Cites: Midwifery. 2010 Dec;26(6):e25-3019152989
Cites: Birth. 2011 Mar;38(1):36-4621332773
Cites: Sociol Health Illn. 2011 Nov;33(7):987-100121668457
Cites: Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):e286-9221454000
Cites: Midwifery. 2012 Feb;28(1):86-9221237538
Cites: Midwifery. 2013 Jan;29(1):10-722906490
PubMed ID
27172510 View in PubMed
Less detail

The core of after death care in relation to organ donation - a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275845
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2014 Oct;30(5):275-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Anna Forsberg
Anne Flodén
Annette Lennerling
Veronika Karlsson
Madeleine Nilsson
Isabell Fridh
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2014 Oct;30(5):275-82
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Brain Death
Critical Care Nursing - methods
Female
Grounded Theory
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Sweden
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how intensive and critical care nurses experience and deal with after death care i.e. the period from notification of a possible brain dead person, and thereby a possible organ donor, to the time of post-mortem farewell.
Grounded theory, based on Charmaz' framework, was used to explore what characterises the ICU-nurses concerns during the process of after death and how they handle it. Data was collected from open-ended interviews.
The core category: achieving a basis for organ donation through dignified and respectful care of the deceased person and the close relatives highlights the main concern of the 29 informants. This concern is categorised into four main areas: safeguarding the dignity of the deceased person, respecting the relatives, dignified and respectful care, enabling a dignified farewell.
After death care requires the provision of intense, technical, medical and nursing interventions to enable organ donation from a deceased person. It is achieved by extensive nursing efforts to preserve and safeguard the dignity of and respect for the deceased person and the close relatives, within an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity.
PubMed ID
25042694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disclosing victimisation to healthcare professionals in Sweden: a constructivist grounded theory study of experiences among men exposed to interpersonal violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287705
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Jun 20;6(6):e010847
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2016
Author
Johanna Simmons
Adrianus Jelmer Brüggemann
Katarina Swahnberg
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Jun 20;6(6):e010847
Date
Jun-20-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Crime Victims - psychology
Disclosure
Female
Grounded Theory
Health Personnel
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Masculinity
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Qualitative Research
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Violence - psychology
Abstract
To develop a theoretical model concerning male victims' processes of disclosing experiences of victimisation to healthcare professionals in Sweden.
Qualitative interview study.
Informants were recruited from the general population and a primary healthcare centre in Sweden.
Informants were recruited by means of theoretical sampling among respondents in a previous quantitative study. Eligible for this study were men reporting sexual, physical and/or emotional violence victimisation by any perpetrator and reporting that they either had talked to a healthcare provider about their victimisation or had wanted to do so.
Constructivist grounded theory. 12 interviews were performed and saturation was reached after 9.
Several factors influencing the process of disclosing victimisation can be recognised from previous studies concerning female victims, including shame, fear of negative consequences of disclosing, specifics of the patient-provider relationship and time constraints within the healthcare system. However, this study extends previous knowledge by identifying strong negative effects of adherence to masculinity norms for victimised men and healthcare professionals on the process of disclosing. It is also emphasised that the process of disclosing cannot be separated from other, even seemingly unrelated, circumstances in the men's lives.
The process of disclosing victimisation to healthcare professionals was a complex process involving the men's experiences of victimisation, adherence to gender norms, their life circumstances and the dynamics of the actual healthcare encounter.
Notes
Cites: J Couns Psychol. 2011 Jul;58(3):368-8221639615
Cites: Trauma Violence Abuse. 2011 Jul;12(3):135-5021511684
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2002 Feb;12(2):279-8911837376
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Nov;23(4):260-812406480
Cites: J Aggress Confl Peace Res. 2010 Jul 6;2(3):36-5621165167
Cites: Violence Vict. 2014;29(1):152-7024673000
Cites: Violence Vict. 2009;24(3):322-3619634359
Cites: Violence Against Women. 2009 Jul;15(7):852-6819458091
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2013 Mar;30(3):198-20122433592
Cites: Gend Med. 2011 Apr;8(2):69-7921536226
Cites: J Fam Violence. 2011 Aug;26(6):473-48521935262
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Sep;65(6):1222-3417576030
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 May 19;5(5):e00714125991450
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2006 Nov;31(4):447-5217046494
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Dec;23(12):2071-818830771
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Jan 9;166(1):22-3716401807
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Nov;59(2):141-716257618
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2003 Dec;13(4):361-614703325
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 May;14(4):245-589635069
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 1996 Mar;5(3):153-88620256
Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2011 Aug;26(12):2335-5221712340
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(3):503-1615899311
Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2010 May;25(5):929-5119597160
Cites: Violence Against Women. 2006 Nov;12(11):1003-1817043363
Cites: Partner Abuse. 2010 Jan 1;1(3):286-31320686677
Cites: Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2015 May;16(3):281-825248144
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010 Oct 22;10:63420964871
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Aug 5;302(5):493-50119654384
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Apr;70(7):1011-820122774
Cites: Psychol Men Masc. 2011 Apr;12(2):112-12721841915
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2005 Sep;36(1-2):71-8416134045
PubMed ID
27324711 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences of using information and communication technology within the first year after stroke - a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295335
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2018 Mar; 40(5):561-568
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Martha Gustavsson
Charlotte Ytterberg
Mille Nabsen Marwaa
Kerstin Tham
Susanne Guidetti
Author Affiliation
a Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society , Karolinska Institutet , Huddinge , Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2018 Mar; 40(5):561-568
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Computers
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Grounded Theory
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Mobile Applications
Safety
Smartphone
Stroke - psychology
Stroke rehabilitation
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify how people 6-12 months after stroke were using and integrating information and communication technology (ICT) in their everyday lives.
To capture the participants' experiences, one focus group and 14 individual interviews were carried out in Sweden and Denmark regarding the use of ICT in everyday life. The participants comprised 11 men and seven women aged 41-79 years. A grounded theory approach was used throughout the study and a constant comparative method was used in the analysis.
Five categories were identified from the analysis of the interviews with the participants: 1) Using the mobile phone to feel safe, 2) Staying connected with others, 3) Recreating everyday life, 4) A tool for managing everyday life, and 5) Overcoming obstacles for using ICT. From these categories one core category emerged: The drive to integrate ICT in everyday life after stroke.
People with stroke had a strong drive to integrate ICT in order to manage and bring meaning to their everyday lives, although sometimes they needed support and adaptations. It is not only possible but also necessary to start using ICT in rehabilitation in order to support people's recovery and promote participation in everyday life after stroke. Implications for rehabilitation People with stroke have a strong drive for using information and communication technology in their everyday lives, although support and adaptations are needed. The recovery process of people with stroke could benefit from the use of ICT in the rehabilitation and ICT could possibly contribute to independence and promote participation in everyday life. Knowledge from this study can be used in the development of an ICT-based stroke rehabilitation model.
PubMed ID
27976926 View in PubMed
Less detail

"I have surly passed a limit, it is simply too much": women's and men's experiences of stress and wellbeing when living within a process of housework resignation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278292
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Mar 04;16:224
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-04-2016
Author
Lisa Harryson
Lena Aléx
Anne Hammarström
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Mar 04;16:224
Date
Mar-04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Grounded Theory
Housekeeping
Humans
Male
Masculinity
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Stereotyped Behavior
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Gender inequality within paid and unpaid work exposes women and men to different environments and responsibilities. These gender patterns shape living conditions for women and men, either negatively or positively, by affecting the prospect of good health. Most public health studies of gender and housework are quantitative, and knowledge about the relationship between housework experiences and health for women and men is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the housework experiences and practices of women and men and their experiences of stress and perceived wellbeing from a gender perspective.
We conducted thematic interviews with four women and four men living in Sweden, and performed an analysis using the Grounded Theory method.
We found that stereotypical gender practices in housework influenced experiences of stress and perceived wellbeing among women and men. Despite proposing gender equality in housework as a means of improving wellbeing, inequality was amplified by the way women and men handle the gendered division of housework. We call this recurring theme "The process of housework resignation", which also constitute the core category in our analysis. "The process of housework resignation" was theorised from the categories "Gender practices in housework", "Experiencing stress and wellbeing" and "Managing daily life".
Stereotypical gender practices in housework can increase experiences of stress among women and men. Challenging stereotypical masculinities can be a key for breaking the process of resignation in housework and for facilitating improved health among both women and men in heterosexual couple relationships within a Swedish context.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 May;50(10):1385-40110741575
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2008 Jun;15(2):169-7618476859
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Sep;51(6):931-910972436
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1988;26(3):309-173279520
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Dec;45(11):1729-399428091
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1999 Mar;40(1):32-4510331320
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):175-8116581710
Cites: Sociol Health Illn. 2006 May;28(4):385-40916669805
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 May;97(5):860-617395852
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2007 Dec;22(6):794-80416987943
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):21-718426781
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2014 Jun;24(3):422-724567294
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Mar;66(3):271-620940171
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Jun;74(11):1675-8321764489
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Dec;41(6):1545-5221828110
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2000 May;48(6):247-5610863868
PubMed ID
26944701 View in PubMed
Less detail

Integrating care for neurodevelopmental disorders by unpacking control: A grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282090
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:31987
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Gustaf Waxegård
Hans Thulesius
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:31987
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - therapy
Autism Spectrum Disorder - therapy
Child
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Grounded Theory
Health Personnel
Health services
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurodevelopmental Disorders - therapy
Patient Care Planning
Patient care team
Power (Psychology)
Quality of Life
Sweden
Work
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
To establish integrated healthcare pathways for patients with neurodevelopmental disorders (ND) such as autism spectrum disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is challenging. This study sets out to investigate the main concerns for healthcare professionals when integrating ND care pathways and how they resolve these concerns.
Using classic grounded theory (Glaser), we analysed efforts to improve and integrate an ND care pathway for children and youth in a Swedish region over a period of 6 years. Data from 42 individual interviews with a range of ND professionals, nine group interviews with healthcare teams, participant observation, a 2-day dialogue conference, focus group meetings, regional media coverage, and reports from other Swedish regional ND projects were analysed.
The main concern for participants was to deal with overwhelming ND complexity by unpacking control, which is control over strategies to define patients' status and needs. Unpacking control is key to the professionals' strivings to expand constructive life space for patients, to squeeze health care to reach available care goals, to promote professional ideologies, and to uphold workplace integrity. Control-seeking behaviour in relation to ND unpacking is ubiquitous and complicates integration of ND care pathways.
The Unpacking control theory expands central aspects of professions theory and may help to improve ND care development.
Notes
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006 Jul;47(7):744-5016790009
Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jan;127(1):e188-9621172996
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2009 Dec 21;9:24220025770
Cites: J Autism Dev Disord. 2013 Aug;43(8):1749-5723359217
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2000 Summer;12(3):265-9611014739
Cites: Autism. 2004 Dec;8(4):387-40715556958
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2008 Nov;50(11):815-2118811706
Cites: J Intellect Disabil Res. 2005 Apr;49(Pt 4):231-815816809
Cites: Res Dev Disabil. 2009 Nov-Dec;30(6):1288-9619505790
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jan 10;316(7125):133-79462322
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2011 Apr;35(5):1081-821093480
Cites: Neuropharmacology. 2009 Dec;57(7-8):590-60019715710
Cites: Res Dev Disabil. 2007 Jul-Sep;28(4):341-5216765022
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2006 Sep;26(5):555-7216687197
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2009 May;37(4):551-6419016322
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2013 Nov;25(4 Pt 2):1201-1324342835
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jul 1;73(7):705-1227192050
Cites: J Child Neurol. 2010 Jan;25(1):120-619738235
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Sep 24;337:a123918815170
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2013 Jul 10;13:18623842080
Cites: Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2011 Apr;156B(3):255-7421438136
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2005 Jan;94(1):2-1515858952
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 May 21;13:18423692803
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2015 Jun;56(6):598-61725706049
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006 Mar-Apr;47(3-4):313-3716492262
Cites: Autism. 2012 Sep;16(5):532-4621610188
Cites: Curr Top Behav Neurosci. 2014;16:235-6624214656
Cites: J Autism Dev Disord. 2008 Oct;38(9):1611-2418327636
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;48(7):687-9417593149
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2002 Jul;181:43-812091262
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;48(8):506-1614574826
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2003 Dec;15(6):509-2114660534
Cites: BMJ. 2012 May 28;344:e350222645185
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015 May 13;10:2767925977121
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2012;7:null22740842
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Mar 8;383(9920):896-91024074734
Cites: J Autism Dev Disord. 2005 Apr;35(2):241-5715909410
Cites: Contemp Nurse. 2005 Sep;20(1):28-3716295340
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2012 Jul;16(5):1081-9121667201
Cites: Nurs N Z. 2003 Oct;9(9):21-315484499
Cites: Autism. 2014 Oct;18(7):771-8125128332
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004;13 Suppl 1:I80-9215322959
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2012 Nov;121(4):991-101022612200
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2013 Mar 05;13:7423497082
Cites: Nurs Health Sci. 2006 Jun;8(2):88-9416764560
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Jul;75(2):264-822560883
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 Apr;135(4):e994-100125733754
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;62(8):896-90216061767
Cites: Autism. 2014 Jan;18(1):6-1624151128
Cites: Autism. 2008 May;12(3):309-2418445738
Cites: Acad Pediatr. 2013 Sep-Oct;13(5):390-924011743
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2014 Mar 13;14:7424625135
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jul 15;368(9531):210-516844490
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;160(1):4-1212505793
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2013 Nov;25(4 Pt 2):1489-50324342852
Cites: J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):364-7014641717
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015 Mar 27;10:2510025819844
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2010 Sep 03;10:6720815868
Cites: Cogn Behav Ther. 2009;38 Suppl 1:29-3422946137
Cites: J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2010;39(6):749-6021058123
Cites: Int J Health Plann Manage. 2004 Oct-Dec;19(4):383-9815688879
Cites: J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2010;39(6):723-521058120
Cites: Int J Evid Based Healthc. 2009 Jun;7(2):61-7421631848
Cites: J Atten Disord. 2015 Sep;19(9):741-5424336124
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016 Apr 05;11:3093827052426
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;164(6):942-817541055
Cites: Res Dev Disabil. 2010 Nov-Dec;31(6):1543-5120634041
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Jan;115(1):e97-10415629972
Cites: J Child Fam Stud. 2013 Apr;22(3):368-37623524401
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 May;14(3):127-3715959658
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2014 Apr 3;19(3):169-17624700210
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2004 Mar;7(1):59-63; discussion 65-915119688
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;53(6):695-70522211517
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Sep;59(6):1193-20515210091
Cites: Med J Aust. 2002 Nov 18;177(10):554-712429005
Cites: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014 Mar 21;9:2310624656260
Cites: J Autism Dev Disord. 2008 May;38(5):827-3917882539
Cites: J Autism Dev Disord. 2004 Jun;34(3):329-3915264500
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2012 Sep;15(3):247-7722869324
Cites: Autism. 2014 Apr;18(3):272-8023739542
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2015 Feb-Mar;36(2):98-10525650952
PubMed ID
27609793 View in PubMed
Less detail

"I want a normal life like everyone else": Daily life of asylum seekers in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281763
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016 Nov;23(6):416-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Lilja Ingvarsson
Snæfrídur Thóra Egilson
Unnur Dís Skaptadottir
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016 Nov;23(6):416-24
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Grounded Theory
Habits
Housing
Humans
Iceland
Male
Personal Autonomy
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Refugees - psychology
Self Concept
Social Conditions
Social Participation
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Time Factors
Unemployment - psychology
Abstract
An ever-increasing number of people seek asylum in Iceland. The wait for resolution on application for asylum can take up to three years. During this time participation in daily occupations is disrupted. This study was carried out to gain an understanding of the experience of living as an asylum seeker in Iceland. It explored asylum seekers' opportunities for participation in occupations as well as their overall experiences while waiting for the processing of their application.
Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine participants, of whom six were asylum seekers. A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied to categorize and synthesize data.
Four major categories emerged that reflected the participants' difficult living conditions, lack of opportunities for participation, lack of belonging, and feelings of powerlessness. The long processing time of their applications was enormously stressful as well as not being in charge of one's life, living conditions, or income.
The results indicate that the long processing time of application for asylum has deteriorating effects on health. In order to promote asylum seekers' well-being and occupational rights attention needs to be focused on their living conditions and opportunities for participation in meaningful occupations, including work.
PubMed ID
26940146 View in PubMed
Less detail

33 records – page 1 of 4.