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Alcoholic liver disease patients' perspective of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention after hepatic encephalopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280012
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2016 Sep;25(17-18):2457-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Maria Rudkjaer Mikkelsen
Carsten Hendriksen
Frank Vinholt Schiødt
Susan Rydahl-Hansen
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2016 Sep;25(17-18):2457-67
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Grounded Theory
Hepatic Encephalopathy - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Abstract
To identify and describe the impact of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients after hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives.
Patients who have experienced alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy have reduced quality of life, multiple complications, and social problems, and rehabilitation opportunities for these patients are limited.
A grounded theory study and an evaluation study of a controlled intervention study.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 alcoholic liver disease patients who were diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy and participated in a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention. Richard S. Lazarus's theory of stress and coping inspired the interview guide.
The significance of a coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention on alcoholic liver disease patients' ability to cope with problems after surviving alcohol-induced hepatic encephalopathy in terms of their interaction with professionals and relatives was characterised by the core category 'regain control over the diseased body'. This is subdivided into three separate categories: 'the experience of being physically strong', 'togetherness' and 'self-control', and they impact each other and are mutually interdependent.
Alcoholic liver disease patients described the strength of the rehabilitation as regaining control over the diseased body. Professionals and relatives of patients with alcoholic liver disease may need to focus on strengthening and preserving patients' control of their diseased body by facilitating the experience of togetherness, self-control and physical strength when interacting with and supporting patients with alcoholic liver disease.
A coping and physical activity-oriented rehabilitation intervention may help alcoholic liver disease patients to regain control over their diseased body and give patients the experience of togetherness, self-control and physical strength. Professionals should be aware of giving the patients the experience of togetherness in their interactions, help them perceive self-control and gain physical strength during their rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
27256537 View in PubMed
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Assisted normality--a grounded theory of adolescent's experiences of living with personal assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279004
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2016;38(11):1053-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Lill Hultman
Ulla Forinder
Pernilla Pergert
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2016;38(11):1053-62
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology - standards
Disabled Persons - psychology
Emotional Intelligence
Family Relations - psychology
Female
Grounded Theory
Health - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to explore how adolescents with disabilities experience everyday life with personal assistants.
In this qualitative study, individual interviews were conducted at 35 occasions with 16 Swedish adolescents with disabilities, in the ages 16-21. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology.
The adolescents' main concern was to achieve normality, which is about doing rather than being normal. They try to resolve this by assisted normality utilizing personal assistance. Assisted normality can be obtained by the existing relationship, the cooperation between the assistant and the adolescent and the situational placement of the assistant. Normality is obstructed by physical, social and psychological barriers.
This study is from the adolescents' perspective and has implications for understanding the value of having access to personal assistance in order to achieve assisted normality and enable social interaction in everyday life.
Access to personal assistance is important to enable social interaction in everyday life. A good and functional relationship is enabled through the existing relation, co-operation and situational placement of the assistant. If the assistant is not properly sensitized, young people risk turning into objects of care. Access to personal assistants cannot compensate for disabling barriers in the society as for example lack of acceptance.
PubMed ID
26482646 View in PubMed
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Balancing Risk: A Grounded Theory Study of Pregnant Women's Decisions to (Dis)Continue Antidepressant Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279666
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jul;36(7):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Lene Nygaard
Camilla Blach Rossen
Niels Buus
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jul;36(7):485-92
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Decision Making
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Grounded Theory
Humans
Medication Adherence - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - psychology
Treatment Refusal - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study explored how eight pregnant women diagnosed with depression managed the decision whether or not to take antidepressants during pregnancy. In total, 11 interviews were conducted and analysed by means of constructivist grounded theory. The major category constructed was Balancing risk, with two minor categories: Assessing depression and antidepressants and Evaluating the impact of significant others. The participants tried to make the safest decision, taking all aspects of their life into consideration. They described successful decision-making in the context of managing social norms that surround pregnancy, in a way that was acceptable to themselves, their significant others and healthcare professionals.
PubMed ID
26309167 View in PubMed
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Being in a safe and thus secure place, the core of early labour: A secondary analysis in a Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282150
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:30230
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Ing-Marie Carlsson
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:30230
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Decision Making
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Emotions
Female
Grounded Theory
Hospitalization
Humans
Labor Onset - psychology
Midwifery
Parturition - psychology
Patient Participation
Patient Preference - psychology
Patient Safety
Perinatal care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Early labour is the very first phase of the labour process and is considered to be a period of time when no professional attendance is needed. However there is a high frequency of women who seek care at the delivery wards during this phase. When a woman is admitted to the delivery ward, one role for midwives is to determine whether the woman is in established labour or not. If the woman is assessed as being in early labour she will probably then be advised to return home. This recommendation is made due to past research that found that the longer a woman is in hospital the higher the risk for complications for her and her child. Women have described how this situation leaves them in a vulnerable situation where their preferences are not always met and where they are not always included in the decision-making process.
The aim of this study was to generate a theory based on where a woman chooses to be during the early labour process and to increase our understanding about how experiences can differ from place to place.
The method was a secondary analysis with grounded theory. The data used in the analysis was from two qualitative interview studies and 37 transcripts.
The findings revealed a substantive theory that women needed to be in a safe and thus secure place during early labour. This theory also describes the interplay between how women ascribed their meaning of childbirth as either a natural live event or a medical one, how this influenced where they wanted to be during early labour, and how that chosen place influenced their experiences of labour and birth.
Notes
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Cites: Midwifery. 2013 Jan;29(1):10-722906490
PubMed ID
27172510 View in PubMed
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The challenging process of disclosing bullying victimization: A grounded theory study from the victim's point of view.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301203
Source
J Health Psychol. 2018 07; 23(8):1110-1118
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Ylva Bjereld
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Health Psychol. 2018 07; 23(8):1110-1118
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bullying - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Grounded Theory
Humans
Male
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Young Adult
Abstract
School children are usually encouraged to tell an adult whether they are being bullied. Despite this encouragement, a significant percentage of bullied students do not disclose victimization. Previous research has often failed to include this group of hidden victims, thereby limiting the available knowledge about victimization disclosure. This study aimed to investigate the process of disclosing bullying victimization from the victim's point of view. Interviews with Swedish youth who had been or currently were victims of bullying in school were carried out and analyzed with grounded theory methods using two-step coding.
PubMed ID
27153857 View in PubMed
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Circling the undefined-A grounded theory study of intercultural consultations in Swedish primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298247
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(8):e0203383
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Erica Rothlind
Uno Fors
Helena Salminen
Per Wändell
Solvig Ekblad
Author Affiliation
Culture Medicine, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(8):e0203383
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Culture
Female
Grounded Theory
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Sweden
Abstract
Well-functioning physician-patient communication is central to primary care consultations. An increasing demand on primary care in many countries to manage a culturally diverse population has highlighted the need for improved communication skills in intercultural consultations. In previous studies, intercultural consultations in primary care have often been described as complex for various reasons, but studies exploring physician-patient interactions contributing to the understanding of why they are complex are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore intercultural physician-patient communication in primary care consultations, generating a conceptual model of the interpersonal interactions as described by both the patients and the physicians. Using grounded theory methodology, 15 residents in family medicine and 30 foreign-born patients, the latter with Arabic and Somali as native languages, were interviewed. The analysis generated a conceptual model named circling the undefined, where a silent agreement on issues fundamental to the core of the consultation was inadequately presumed and the communicative behaviors used did not contribute to clarity. This could be a possible contributory cause of the perceived complexity of intercultural consultations. Identifying what takes place on an interpersonal level in intercultural consultations might be a first step towards building a common ground for increased mutual understanding, thereby bringing us one step closer to sharing, rather than circling the undefined.
PubMed ID
30161227 View in PubMed
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The core of after death care in relation to organ donation - a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275845
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2014 Oct;30(5):275-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Anna Forsberg
Anne Flodén
Annette Lennerling
Veronika Karlsson
Madeleine Nilsson
Isabell Fridh
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2014 Oct;30(5):275-82
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Brain Death
Critical Care Nursing - methods
Female
Grounded Theory
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Sweden
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how intensive and critical care nurses experience and deal with after death care i.e. the period from notification of a possible brain dead person, and thereby a possible organ donor, to the time of post-mortem farewell.
Grounded theory, based on Charmaz' framework, was used to explore what characterises the ICU-nurses concerns during the process of after death and how they handle it. Data was collected from open-ended interviews.
The core category: achieving a basis for organ donation through dignified and respectful care of the deceased person and the close relatives highlights the main concern of the 29 informants. This concern is categorised into four main areas: safeguarding the dignity of the deceased person, respecting the relatives, dignified and respectful care, enabling a dignified farewell.
After death care requires the provision of intense, technical, medical and nursing interventions to enable organ donation from a deceased person. It is achieved by extensive nursing efforts to preserve and safeguard the dignity of and respect for the deceased person and the close relatives, within an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity.
PubMed ID
25042694 View in PubMed
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Dignity realization of patients with stroke in hospital care: A grounded theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300228
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2019 Mar; 26(2):378-389
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Sunna Rannikko
Minna Stolt
Riitta Suhonen
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2019 Mar; 26(2):378-389
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Grounded Theory
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Personhood
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care - ethics - standards
Stroke - complications - psychology
Abstract
Dignity is seen as an important but complex concept in the healthcare context. In this context, the discussion of dignity includes concepts of other ethical principles such as autonomy and privacy. Patients consider dignity to cover individuality, patient's feelings, communication, and the behavior of healthcare personnel. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the realization of patients' dignity in hospital care and the focus of the study is therefore on the realization of dignity of the vulnerable group of patients with stroke.
The aim of the study was to create a theoretical construct to describe the dignity realization of patients with stroke in hospital care.
Patients with stroke (n = 16) were interviewed in 2015 using a semi-structured interview containing open questions concerning dignity. The data were analyzed using constant comparison of Grounded Theory.
Ethical approval for the research was obtained from the Ethics Committee of the University. The permission for the research was given by the hospital. Informed consent was obtained from participants.
The "Theory of Dignity Realization of Patients with Stroke in Hospital Care" consists of a core category including generic elements of the new situation and dignity realization types. The core category was identified as "Dignity in a new situation" and the generic elements as health history, life history, individuality and stroke. Dignity of patients with stroke is realized through specific types of realization: person-related dignity type, control-related dignity type, independence-related dignity type, social-related dignity type, and care-related dignity type.
The theory has similar elements with the previous literature but the whole construct is new. The theory reveals possible special characteristics in dignity realization of patients with stroke.
For healthcare personnel, the theory provides a frame for a better understanding and recognition of how dignity of patients with stroke is realized.
PubMed ID
28659067 View in PubMed
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Disclosing victimisation to healthcare professionals in Sweden: a constructivist grounded theory study of experiences among men exposed to interpersonal violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287705
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Jun 20;6(6):e010847
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2016
Author
Johanna Simmons
Adrianus Jelmer Brüggemann
Katarina Swahnberg
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 Jun 20;6(6):e010847
Date
Jun-20-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Crime Victims - psychology
Disclosure
Female
Grounded Theory
Health Personnel
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Masculinity
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Qualitative Research
Sexual Partners
Sweden
Violence - psychology
Abstract
To develop a theoretical model concerning male victims' processes of disclosing experiences of victimisation to healthcare professionals in Sweden.
Qualitative interview study.
Informants were recruited from the general population and a primary healthcare centre in Sweden.
Informants were recruited by means of theoretical sampling among respondents in a previous quantitative study. Eligible for this study were men reporting sexual, physical and/or emotional violence victimisation by any perpetrator and reporting that they either had talked to a healthcare provider about their victimisation or had wanted to do so.
Constructivist grounded theory. 12 interviews were performed and saturation was reached after 9.
Several factors influencing the process of disclosing victimisation can be recognised from previous studies concerning female victims, including shame, fear of negative consequences of disclosing, specifics of the patient-provider relationship and time constraints within the healthcare system. However, this study extends previous knowledge by identifying strong negative effects of adherence to masculinity norms for victimised men and healthcare professionals on the process of disclosing. It is also emphasised that the process of disclosing cannot be separated from other, even seemingly unrelated, circumstances in the men's lives.
The process of disclosing victimisation to healthcare professionals was a complex process involving the men's experiences of victimisation, adherence to gender norms, their life circumstances and the dynamics of the actual healthcare encounter.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27324711 View in PubMed
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Experiences of using information and communication technology within the first year after stroke - a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295335
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2018 Mar; 40(5):561-568
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Martha Gustavsson
Charlotte Ytterberg
Mille Nabsen Marwaa
Kerstin Tham
Susanne Guidetti
Author Affiliation
a Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society , Karolinska Institutet , Huddinge , Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2018 Mar; 40(5):561-568
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Computers
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Grounded Theory
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Mobile Applications
Safety
Smartphone
Stroke - psychology
Stroke rehabilitation
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify how people 6-12 months after stroke were using and integrating information and communication technology (ICT) in their everyday lives.
To capture the participants' experiences, one focus group and 14 individual interviews were carried out in Sweden and Denmark regarding the use of ICT in everyday life. The participants comprised 11 men and seven women aged 41-79 years. A grounded theory approach was used throughout the study and a constant comparative method was used in the analysis.
Five categories were identified from the analysis of the interviews with the participants: 1) Using the mobile phone to feel safe, 2) Staying connected with others, 3) Recreating everyday life, 4) A tool for managing everyday life, and 5) Overcoming obstacles for using ICT. From these categories one core category emerged: The drive to integrate ICT in everyday life after stroke.
People with stroke had a strong drive to integrate ICT in order to manage and bring meaning to their everyday lives, although sometimes they needed support and adaptations. It is not only possible but also necessary to start using ICT in rehabilitation in order to support people's recovery and promote participation in everyday life after stroke. Implications for rehabilitation People with stroke have a strong drive for using information and communication technology in their everyday lives, although support and adaptations are needed. The recovery process of people with stroke could benefit from the use of ICT in the rehabilitation and ICT could possibly contribute to independence and promote participation in everyday life. Knowledge from this study can be used in the development of an ICT-based stroke rehabilitation model.
PubMed ID
27976926 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.