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The 13th Annual CARNA Awards of Nursing Excellence: Meet the recipients of Alberta's premier registered nursing awards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121391
Source
Alta RN. 2012;68(2):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

229 people, 15,000 body parts: pathologists help solve Swissair 111's grisly puzzles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203179
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1999
Author
N. Robb
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 26;160(2):241-3
Date
Jan-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coroners and Medical Examiners - psychology
DNA Fingerprinting
Family - psychology
Grief
Humans
Nova Scotia
Professional-Family Relations
Abstract
Only 1 of the 229 passengers and crew members killed when Swissair Flight 111 crashed off Nova Scotia in September was visually identifiable. Identifying everyone else on board involved medical and dental detective work of the first order.
PubMed ID
9951448 View in PubMed
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Adolescent coping with grief after the death of a loved one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190272
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2002 Jun;8(3):137-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Katja Rask
Marja Kaunonen
Marita Paunonen-Ilmonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland. katja.rask@mail.diak.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2002 Jun;8(3):137-42
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Female
Finland
Grief
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this article was to describe adolescent coping after the death of a loved one. Data were obtained by two self-report questionnaires filled in by 14-16-year-old pupils in two secondary schools in Finland. The sample consisted of 89 adolescents (70% girls) who had each experienced the death of a loved one. The instrument used in the study was developed by Hogan and DeSantis. The article reports the responses to two open-ended questions. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The most important factors that helped adolescents cope with grief were self-help and support from parents, relatives and friends. However, the official social support system was not experienced as very helpful. No one reported help, for example, from school health services. According to the adolescents, fear of death, a sense of loneliness and intrusive thoughts were factors that hindered coping with grief. Some respondents felt that parents or friends were an additional burden on them. The results are discussed in terms of identifying the different impact of social support, the importance of self-help and professional help. Knowledge of factors that have an effect on adolescent coping with bereavement is important for families, effective nursing practice, school health services and parents.
PubMed ID
12000632 View in PubMed
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Anticipatory grief among close relatives of patients in hospice and palliative wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134343
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2012 Mar;29(2):134-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Asa K Johansson
Agneta Grimby
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. asakjohansson@hotmail.com
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2012 Mar;29(2):134-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticipation, Psychological
Family - psychology
Female
Grief
Hospice Care - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms
Palliative Care - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
A Swedish widowhood study revealed that four out of ten widows regarded the pre-loss period more stressful than the post-loss. The present investigation of close relatives to patients dying from cancer (using interviews and the Anticipatory Grief Scale) found that preparatory grief involves much emotional stress, as intense preoccupation with the dying, longing for his/her former personality, loneliness, tearfulness, cognitive dysfunction, irritability, anger and social withdrawal, and a need to talk. Psychological status was bad one by every fifth. However, the relatives mostly stated adjustment and ability to mobilize strength to cope with the situation. The results suggest development of support and guiding programs also for the anticipatory period.
PubMed ID
21596732 View in PubMed
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Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women's experience after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno's taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142108
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2010 Aug;115(3):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Annsofie Adolfsson
Per-Göran Larsson
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden. annsofie.adolfsson@his.se
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2010 Aug;115(3):201-9
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Grief
Humans
Pregnancy
Sweden
Abstract
Grief is a normal phenomenon but showing great variation depending on cultural and personal features. Bonanno and Kaltman have nonetheless proposed five aspects of normal grief. The aim of this study was to investigate if women with miscarriage experience normal grief.
Content analyses of 25 transcribed conversations with women 4 weeks after their early miscarriages were classified depending on the meaning-bearing units according to Bonanno and Kaltman's categories. In the factor analyses, these categories were compared with the Perinatal Grief Scale and women's age, number of children and number of miscarriages, and gestational weeks.
Women with miscarriage fulfill the criteria for having normal grief according to Bonanno and Kaltman. All of the 25 women had meaning-bearing units that were classified as cognitive disorganization, dysphoria, and health deficits, whereas disrupted social and occupational functioning and positive aspects of bereavement were represented in 22 of 25 women. From the factor analysis, there are no differences in the expression of the intensity of the grief, irrespective of whether or not the women were primiparous, younger, or had suffered a first miscarriage.
Women's experience of grief after miscarriage is similar to general grief after death. After her loss, the woman must have the possibility of expressing and working through her grief before she can finish her pregnancy emotionally. The care-giver must facilitate this process and accept that the intensity of the grief is not dependent on the woman's age, or her number of earlier miscarriages.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20636255 View in PubMed
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[Are grieving persons and persons in crisis declared of incapacity by experts?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29609
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1853-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2005
Author
Kari Dyregrov
Author Affiliation
Senter for krisepsykologi, Fabrikkgt. 5, 5059 Bergen. kari@krisepsyk.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1853-5
Date
Jun-30-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child, Preschool
Crisis Intervention - ethics
Grief
Humans
Norway
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Social Support
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - prevention & control
PubMed ID
16012561 View in PubMed
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Assessment of need for a children's hospice program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212152
Source
Death Stud. 1996 May-Jun;20(3):247-68
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Davies
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, British Columbia Research Institute for Child and Family Health, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Death Stud. 1996 May-Jun;20(3):247-68
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Death
Grief
Health services needs and demand
Hospice Care
Humans
Program Development
Abstract
Canuck Place, North America's first free-standing pediatric hospice of its kind, opened in 1995 in British Columbia, Canada. The province-wide program encompasses a broad spectrum of services intended to support community-based care and provide periodic, facility-based respite and palliative care to children with life-threatening, progressive illness and to their families. Loss and grief support is another integral component of the program. The concept of pediatric hospice care is founded on the premise that dying children and their families can benefit from care designed to maximize present quality of life; yet, the creation of such programs must be based on demonstrated need. One vital step in the development of the Canuck Place program was assessing the need for such a program within the province. Data from both traditional quantitative and less traditional qualitative sources were used to document and put forth an argument in support of developing a children's hospice program. The final report addressed several components that are summarized in this article for the purposes of assisting others who may wish to undertake similar projects in their own communities.
PubMed ID
10160554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes of Nurses and Physicians About Clinical Autopsy in Neonatal and Adult Hospital Care: A Survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266222
Source
Nurs Res. 2015 Jul-Aug;64(4):264-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
Berit Mjörnheim
Anders Rosendahl
Lennart C Eriksson
Christina Takman
Source
Nurs Res. 2015 Jul-Aug;64(4):264-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Autopsy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Grief
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The rate of autopsies has dropped to low levels in Western countries.
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences and attitudes of registered nurses (RNs) and physicians (MD) toward clinical autopsies in neonatal and adult hospital care in Sweden.
RNs and MDs in neonatal and adult care specialized clinics at a university-affiliated hospital in Sweden were surveyed. Survey responses were tallied, and free-text comments were assessed with qualitative content analysis.
Three hundred thirty-six surveys were distributed; the response rate was 35%. Most RNs and 14% of the MDs had limited or no experience participating in an autopsy. Notably, few RNs and approximately one third of the MDs were familiar with the autopsy processes and the treatment of the deceased person's body after an autopsy. More than one third of RNs had experience with talking to relatives regarding autopsy. Most agreed that an autopsy could be supportive for relatives during the grieving process and beneficial for the quality of healthcare. Most MDs (70%) thought that autopsies should be performed more frequently. Qualitative results emphasized that RNs and MDs thought that autopsy information supported the grieving process of relatives-especially parents who had lost a child.
The survey data confirm belief in the value of clinical autopsies in neonatal and adult hospital care. RNs and MDs should receive training about the autopsy process and procedures for obtaining consent for an autopsy. RNs are in a position to support the decision making of relatives about providing consent for autopsy and have an opportunity to take a more active role in the autopsy process.
PubMed ID
26126061 View in PubMed
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Being a family in the midst of living and dying.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82244
Source
J Palliat Care. 2006;22(1):26-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Syrén Susanne M
Saveman Britt-Inger
Benzein Eva G
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Kalmar University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2006;22(1):26-32
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - psychology
Attitude to Death
Child
Communication
Depression - psychology
Existentialism - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Grief
Humans
Life Change Events
Loneliness
Love
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Palliative Care - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Spirituality
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to illuminate the way of being a family when one family member is in the midst of living and dying. A family systems frame and a life world perspective were used in interviews with five families. A qualitative analysis inspired by Giorgi revealed dialectic and dynamic processes in constant motion within and between the continua being in affinity-being in loneliness, being in power-being in helplessness, and being in continuity-being in disruption. When families were moving in the direction of being in affinity, power, and continuity, these seemed to be prerequisites for enduring their challenged life situation and for giving them a kind of repose. When the movements were in the opposite direction, existential and emotional suffering were manifested as individual embodied experiences such as depression and anxiety.
PubMed ID
16689412 View in PubMed
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200 records – page 1 of 20.