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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Association study of a promoter polymorphism of UFD1L gene with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193750
Source
Am J Med Genet. 2001 Aug 8;105(6):529-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2001
Author
A. De Luca
A. Pasini
F. Amati
A. Botta
G. Spalletta
S. Alimenti
F. Caccamo
E. Conti
J. Trakalo
F. Macciardi
B. Dallapiccola
G. Novelli
Author Affiliation
Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, Tor Vergata University of Rome, Via di Tor Vergata 135, 00133 Rome, Italy.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 2001 Aug 8;105(6):529-33
Date
Aug-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Canada
Cell Line
Cohort Studies
DNA - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Humans
Italy
Luminescent Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Schizophrenia - genetics - pathology
Abstract
Schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders are often found in patients affected by DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial syndrome (DGS/VCFS) as a result of hemizygosity of chromosome 22q11.2. We evaluated the UFD1L gene, mapping within the DGS/VCFS region, as a potential candidate for schizophrenia susceptibility. UFD1L encodes for the ubiquitin fusion degradation 1 protein, which is expressed in the medial telencephalon during mouse development. Using case control, simplex families (trios), and functional studies, we provided evidence for association between schizophrenia and a single nucleotide functional polymorphism, -277A/G, located within the noncoding region upstream the first exon of the UFD1L gene. The results are supportive of UFD1L involvement in the neurodevelopmental origin of schizophrenia and contribute in delineating etiological and pathogenetic mechanism of the schizophrenia subtype related to 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.
PubMed ID
11496370 View in PubMed
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The Copenhagen Accord for limiting global warming: criteria, constraints, and available avenues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97110
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 May 4;107(18):8055-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2010
Author
Veerabhadran Ramanathan
Yangyang Xu
Author Affiliation
The Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. vramanathan@ucsd.edu
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 May 4;107(18):8055-62
Date
May-4-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide - standards
Denmark
Global warming
Green Chemistry Technology
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Time Factors
Abstract
At last, all the major emitters of greenhouse gases (GHGs) have agreed under the Copenhagen Accord that global average temperature increase should be kept below 2 degrees C. This study develops the criteria for limiting the warming below 2 degrees C, identifies the constraints imposed on policy makers, and explores available mitigation avenues. One important criterion is that the radiant energy added by human activities should not exceed 2.5 (range: 1.7-4) watts per square meter (Wm(-2)) of the Earth's surface. The blanket of man-made GHGs has already added 3 (range: 2.6-3.5) Wm(-2). Even if GHG emissions peak in 2015, the radiant energy barrier will be exceeded by 100%, requiring simultaneous pursuit of three avenues: (i) reduce the rate of thickening of the blanket by stabilizing CO(2) concentration below 441 ppm during this century (a massive decarbonization of the energy sector is necessary to accomplish this Herculean task), (ii) ensure that air pollution laws that reduce the masking effect of cooling aerosols be made radiant energy-neutral by reductions in black carbon and ozone, and (iii) thin the blanket by reducing emissions of short-lived GHGs. Methane and hydrofluorocarbons emerge as the prime targets. These actions, even if we are restricted to available technologies for avenues ii and iii, can reduce the probability of exceeding the 2 degrees C barrier before 2050 to less than 10%, and before 2100 to less than 50%. With such actions, the four decades we have until 2050 should be exploited to develop and scale-up revolutionary technologies to restrict the warming to less than 1.5 degrees C.
PubMed ID
20439712 View in PubMed
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Deployment of a fully-automated green fluorescent protein imaging system in a high arctic autonomous greenhouse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115623
Source
Sensors (Basel). 2013;13(3):3530-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Talal Abboud
Matthew Bamsey
Anna-Lisa Paul
Thomas Graham
Stephen Braham
Rita Noumeir
Alain Berinstain
Robert Ferl
Author Affiliation
Space Science and Technology, Canadian Space Agency, 6767 route de l'aéroport, Longueuil, QC J3Y8Y9, Canada. talal.abboud.1@ens.etsmtl.ca
Source
Sensors (Basel). 2013;13(3):3530-48
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biosensing Techniques
Canada
Ecological Systems, Closed
Green Fluorescent Proteins - chemistry
Humans
Plant Development
Plants
Space Flight
Abstract
Higher plants are an integral part of strategies for sustained human presence in space. Space-based greenhouses have the potential to provide closed-loop recycling of oxygen, water and food. Plant monitoring systems with the capacity to remotely observe the condition of crops in real-time within these systems would permit operators to take immediate action to ensure optimum system yield and reliability. One such plant health monitoring technique involves the use of reporter genes driving fluorescent proteins as biological sensors of plant stress. In 2006 an initial prototype green fluorescent protein imager system was deployed at the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse located in the Canadian High Arctic. This prototype demonstrated the advantageous of this biosensor technology and underscored the challenges in collecting and managing telemetric data from exigent environments. We present here the design and deployment of a second prototype imaging system deployed within and connected to the infrastructure of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse. This is the first imager to run autonomously for one year in the un-crewed greenhouse with command and control conducted through the greenhouse satellite control system. Images were saved locally in high resolution and sent telemetrically in low resolution. Imager hardware is described, including the custom designed LED growth light and fluorescent excitation light boards, filters, data acquisition and control system, and basic sensing and environmental control. Several critical lessons learned related to the hardware of small plant growth payloads are also elaborated.
Notes
Cites: Plant J. 1995 Nov;8(5):777-848528289
Cites: Trends Plant Sci. 2010 Dec;15(12):664-7420846898
Cites: Plant J. 2010 Mar;61(6):909-2120409266
Cites: Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2010 Feb;13(1):96-10119857987
Cites: Plant J. 2007 Apr;50(2):347-6317376166
Cites: Plant Physiol. 2004 Jan;134(1):215-2314701916
Cites: Plant Cell. 2002 Mar;14(3):559-7411910004
Cites: Life Support Biosph Sci. 2002;8(2):83-9111987307
Cites: Plant Cell Rep. 2001 Jul;20(5):376-8212448420
Cites: Plant Physiol. 2001 Jun;126(2):613-2111402191
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2008 Jun;31(6):697-71418182014
Cites: Science. 2011 Apr 15;332(6027):311-221493847
Cites: Gene. 1996;173(1 Spec No):83-78707061
Cites: J Exp Bot. 1997 Jul;48(312):1407-1311541074
Cites: Plant Cell Environ. 2006 Mar;29(3):340-5217080590
Cites: Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2000 Apr;3(2):117-2410712956
PubMed ID
23486220 View in PubMed
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Dye dilution and oximetry for detection of patent foramen ovale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54406
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1998 Apr;97(4):231-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
V. Karttunen
M. Ventilä
M. Hillbom
O. Salonen
H. Haapaniemi
M. Kaste
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1998 Apr;97(4):231-6
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Angiography
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Coloring Agents - chemistry - diagnostic use
Female
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - complications - diagnosis
Humans
Indocyanine Green - chemistry - diagnostic use
Ischemic Attack, Transient - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Oximetry - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Valsalva Maneuver
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a risk factor for stroke of undetermined (cryptogenic) origin. Low cost and non-invasive bedside tests for detection of PFO are needed as alternatives to contrast transesophageal echocardiography. We investigated whether dye dilution curves and oximeter recordings are useful for detecting PFO and what is the prevalence of PFO in patients with cryptogenic stroke determined with these bedside methods. We also studied whether stroke risk factors, number of brain lesions, and stroke recurrence rates were different in patients with an unexplained stroke with and without PFO. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dye dilution curves and oximeter recordings with non-invasive earpiece apparatus were obtained in 59 patients aged under 50 years who had had a cryptogenic brain infarction. The number of ischemic lesions in the brain was counted by MRI. RESULTS: PFO was found in 24 (41%) of 59 patients. There was a 100% concordance in results obtained by dye dilution and by oximetry. Risk factors for stroke were similar in subjects with PFO and those without PFO. No significant association was found between PFO and Valsalva-like activity at stroke onset. Those with PFO did not have more ischemic lesions detected by MRI nor did they have more recurrent ischemic episodes. CONCLUSION: Dye dilution and oximetry are cheap and useful methods for detection of PFO and could be used for screening of the risk of paradoxical embolism. Because these 2 methods were not compared with the golden standard, transesophageal echocardiography, the specificity and sensitivity of the tests remain unsettled.
PubMed ID
9576637 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1943
Author
Standley, PC
Author Affiliation
Field Museum of Natural History
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Edible fruits and berries
Edible greens
Edible roots and bulbs
Abstract
This manual is to be used by military personnel separated from their units while on duty in the Arctic regions. Its purpose is to aid individuals to recognize edible food plants of the area so that in emergency they may subsist from the land. The manual illustrates and describes briefly the most important edible berries, greens, and roots of the most northern areas.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100859.
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Effect of water hardness on the toxicity of cadmium to the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in an artificial growth medium and nutrient-spiked natural lake waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90202
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(3-4):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Källqvist Torsten
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo, Norway. torsten.kallqvist@niva.no
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(3-4):277-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algae, Green - drug effects - growth & development
Cadmium - toxicity
Calcium - analysis
Chelating Agents - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fresh Water - chemistry
Growth - drug effects
Norway
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Toxicity Tests
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
The effect of cadmium (Cd) on the growth rate of the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was investigated at three different levels of water hardness in an artificial growth medium and in three nutrient spiked, Norwegian natural soft lake waters. The lake water with the lowest levels of hardness and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (Lake Byglandsfjorden) showed the highest toxicity attributed to Cd. In water from this lake without addition of calcium and artificial chelators, the EC50 for inhibition of growth rate was 9.4 microg Cd/L and EC10 was 2.8 microg Cd/L. When the hardness of the waters was increased by addition of calcium the adverse effects of Cd were in general reduced. In all tested media, the concentration/effect slope was reduced with increasing hardness. This led to a higher effect of hardness on EC50 than EC10.
PubMed ID
19184742 View in PubMed
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Green synthesis of water-soluble nontoxic polymeric nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258851
Source
Int J Nanomedicine. 2014;9:1883-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Galina F Prozorova
Alexsandr S Pozdnyakov
Nadezhda P Kuznetsova
Svetlana A Korzhova
Artem I Emel'yanov
Tamara G Ermakova
Tat'yana V Fadeeva
Larisa M Sosedova
Source
Int J Nanomedicine. 2014;9:1883-9
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - chemical synthesis - pharmacology
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena - drug effects
Cell Survival - drug effects
Drug Compounding - methods
Green Chemistry Technology - methods
Materials Testing
Metal Nanoparticles - administration & dosage - chemistry
Nanocomposites - administration & dosage - chemistry
Silver - chemistry - pharmacology
Solubility
Triazoles - chemistry
Water - chemistry
Abstract
New water-soluble nontoxic nanocomposites of nanosized silver particles in a polymer matrix were synthesized by a green chemistry method. Nontoxic poly(1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole) was used as a stabilizing precursor agent in aqueous medium. Glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide were used as the silver ion-reducing agents to yield silver nanoparticles 2-26 nm and 2-8 nm in size, respectively. The nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption, and thermogravimetric data analysis. The nanocomposites showed strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.
Notes
Cites: Nanoscale. 2010 May;2(5):763-7020648322
Cites: Int J Nanomedicine. 2011;6:271-8421499424
Cites: Int J Nanomedicine. 2011;6:569-7421674013
Cites: Int J Nanomedicine. 2013;8:3867-7424143090
Cites: Int J Nanomedicine. 2013;8:1507-1623620666
Cites: Int J Nanomedicine. 2013;8:1809-1523687447
Cites: ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2012 Oct 24;4(10):5625-3222992046
PubMed ID
24790430 View in PubMed
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Identification of a molecular target for glutamate regulation of astrocyte water permeability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86262
Source
Glia. 2008 Apr 15;56(6):587-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2008
Author
Gunnarson Eli
Zelenina Marina
Axehult Gustav
Song Yutong
Bondar Alexander
Krieger Patrik
Brismar Hjalmar
Zelenin Sergey
Aperia Anita
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Nordic Centre of Excellence for Research in Water Imbalance Related Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Glia. 2008 Apr 15;56(6):587-96
Date
Apr-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Aquaporin 4 - metabolism
Astrocytes - drug effects - physiology
Benzylamines - pharmacology
Calcium - metabolism
Cell Line, Transformed
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists - pharmacology
Glutamic Acid - pharmacology
Green Fluorescent Proteins - metabolism
Hippocampus - drug effects - physiology
Methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
N-Methylaspartate - pharmacology
Permeability - drug effects
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate - metabolism
Serine - metabolism
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
Transfection - methods
Water - metabolism
Abstract
Astrocytes play a key role for maintenance of brain water homeostasis, but little is known about mechanisms of short-term regulation of astrocyte water permeability. Here, we report that glutamate increases astrocyte water permeability and that the molecular target for this effect is the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) serine 111 residue, which is in a strategic position for control of the water channel gating. The glutamate effect involves activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), intracellular calcium release, and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The physiological impact of our results is underlined by the finding that mGluR activation increases the rate of hypoosmotic tissue swelling in acute rat hippocampal slices. Cerebral ischemia is associated with an excessive release of glutamate, and in postischemic cerebral edema ablation of AQP4 attenuates the degree of damage. Thus, we have identified AQP4 as the molecular target for drugs that may attenuate the development of brain edema.
PubMed ID
18286643 View in PubMed
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Identification of the full-length AE2 (AE2a) isoform as the Golgi-associated anion exchanger in fibroblasts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10308
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 2001 Feb;49(2):259-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
K. Holappa
M. Suokas
P. Soininen
S. Kellokumpu
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kholappa@cc.oulu.fi
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 2001 Feb;49(2):259-69
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anion Transport Proteins
Antiporters
Blotting, Northern
Cell Line
Cricetinae
Detergents
Fibroblasts - metabolism
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Golgi Apparatus - metabolism
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Humans
Immunoblotting
Intracellular Membranes - metabolism
Luminescent Proteins - genetics
Membrane Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Octoxynol
Oligonucleotides, Antisense - pharmacology
Protein Isoforms - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
Na(+)-independent Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers (AE1, AE2, AE3) are generally known as ubiquitous, multispanning plasma membrane proteins that regulate intracellular pH and transepithelial acid-base balance in animal tissues. However, previous immunological evidence has suggested that anion exchanger (AE) proteins may also be present in intracellular membranes, including membranes of the Golgi complex and mitochondria. Here we provide several lines of evidence to show that an AE protein is indeed a resident of the Golgi membranes and that this protein corresponds to the full-length AE2a isoform in fibroblasts. First, both the N- and C-terminal antibodies to AE2 (but not to AE1) detected an AE protein in the Golgi membranes. Golgi localization of this AE2 antigen was evident also in cycloheximide-treated cells, indicating that it is a true Golgi-resident protein. Second, our Northern blotting and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated the presence of only the full-length AE2a mRNA in cells that show prominent Golgi staining with antibodies to AE2. Third, antisense oligonucleotides directed against the translational initiation site of the AE2a mRNA markedly inhibited the expression of the endogenous AE2 protein in the Golgi. Finally, transient expression of the GFP-tagged full-length AE2a protein resulted in predominant accumulation of the fusion protein in the Golgi membranes in COS-7 and CHO-K1 cells. Golgi localization of the AE2a probably involves its oligomerization and/or association with the recently identified Golgi membrane skeleton, because a substantial portion of both the endogenous AE2a and the GFP-tagged fusion protein resisted detergent extraction in cold. (J Histochem Cytochem 49:259-269, 2001)
PubMed ID
11156694 View in PubMed
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[INDOCYANINE GREEN (ICG) IN THE DETECTION OF SENTINEL LYMPH NODES IN ENDOMETRIAL AND CERVIX CANCER].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265883
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2015;61(3):471-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
I V Berlev
E A Ulrikh
Z N Ibragimov
K D Guseinov
T V Gorodnova
E N Korolkova
Yu N Trifanov
E A Nekrasova
A B Saparov
A V Khadzhimba
N A Mikaya
A F Urmancheeva
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2015;61(3):471-6
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Adult
Aged
Coloring Agents - diagnostic use
Endometrial Neoplasms - pathology
Female
Humans
Indocyanine Green - diagnostic use
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphatic Metastasis - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Moscow
Neoplasm Staging
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy - methods
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - pathology
Abstract
We analyzed the international and our own experience of using different dyes in the identification of sentinel lymph nodes in oncogynecological practice. We evaluated the possibility of using indocyanine green (ICG) in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with endometrial and cervical cancer. The first results of the use of ICG at the Oncogynecology Department of the N.N.Petrov Research Institute of Oncology are presented.
PubMed ID
26242164 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.