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22 records – page 1 of 3.

Breast cancer in Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4063
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):577-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A B Miller
L A Gaudette
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):577-80
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Breast cancer was studied over a 20-year period in Inuit populations in the Circumpolar region. A total of 193 breast cancers were observed in women. The incidence increased from 28.2 per 100 000 in 1969-1973 to 34.3 per 100 000 in 1984-1988. However, the incidence is low, about half what could be expected based on the rates in Denmark, Canada and Connecticut (USA). The low incidence could be explained by the Inuit diet and other lifestyle factors. These benefits should be preserved, in particular in the young, to maintain a low breast cancer incidence.
PubMed ID
8813064 View in PubMed
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Cancer among Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. Introduction and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4065
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
N. Christensen
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cancer incidence data for Circumpolar Inuit populations were developed and compiled from Greenland, Canada and Alaska from 1969 to 1988 to provide the largest possible base of data for documenting the unusual patterns of cancer previously reported for these populations. Cancer incidence and population data were transferred to the Danish Cancer Registry. Coded information from various ICD-classifications and codes for the basis of diagnosis were transformed to one format, enabling joint analysis. Standard descriptive analysis was carried out with presentation of number of cases, crude incidence rates (CR), age-standardized rates (world) (ASR), cumulative rates to age 64 years, and indirectly standardized ratios (SIR) to the populations of Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark. The resulting database can be used to support collaborative international research among the Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
8813060 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. A summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3545
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):621-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):621-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Food Habits
Forecasting
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproduction
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The results of an international, collaborative study of cancer in Circumpolar Inuit in Greenland, Canada, Alaska and Russia are summarized. A total of 3 255 incident cancers were diagnosed from 1969 to 1988 among 85 000-110 000 individuals. Indirect standardization (SIR) based on comparison populations in Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark showed excess risk of cancer of the lung, nasopharynx, salivary glands, gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts in both sexes, of liver and stomach cancer in men, and renal and cervical cancer in women. Low risk was observed for cancer of the bladder, breast, endometrium and prostate, and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, leukaemia, multiple myeloma and melanoma. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) of cancer of lung, cervix, nasopharynx and salivary glands among Inuit were among the world's highest as were rates in women of oesophageal and renal cancer. Regional differences in ASRs within the Circumpolar area were observed for cancer of the cervix, lung, colon and rectum, liver, gallbladder and breast. The differences in the Inuit cancer incidence pattern to some extent reflect known variations in lifestyle, diet and other exposures, as well as implementation of cancer control measures. Future research addressing possible individual differences are needed to evaluate environmental and genetic factors in etiology and evaluate intervention studies.
PubMed ID
8813071 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for the cancer pattern in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3549
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown marked differences to other populations in the world. The current paper summarises important risk factors in Greenland, including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco and other lifestyle factors. Details on population structure and history, health care and cancer registration are also included. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813059 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the digestive system in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3548
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):553-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
H H Storm
N H Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):553-70
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Digestive System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Cancer of the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, biliary tract and pancreas was studied in the Inuit populations of Alaska, Canada and Greenland. Indirect standardization to the populations in Canada, Connecticut (USA) and Denmark was used. High risk of oesophageal cancer was observed in both sexes with standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of up to 7. An increased risk of colon and rectum cancer occurred among Alaskan Inuit compared with the Inuit populations in Canada and Greenland, which had lower rates. Liver and gallbladder cancer rates were high, with SIRs of 1.5 to 4.1, whereas there were no differences in pancreatic cancer in the populations compared. Dietary habits, alcohol and tobacco consumption are believed to play an important role in most of the observed cancer patterns, but for liver cancer hepatitis B virus infection is also believed to have a causal role.
PubMed ID
8813062 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the female genital tract in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4062
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):581-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
S K Kjaer
N H Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):581-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - ethnology
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Placenta Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Pregnancy
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Cervical cancer incidence among Inuit is high. Especially women from Greenland exhibit rates which are among the highest in the world. Compared with women in Denmark, USA and Canada, Inuit women have a 3-4 time higher cervical cancer risk. By contrast, the incidence of uterine corpus cancer is low in the Circumpolar area. Both in Greenlandic and Canadian Inuit women, ovarian cancer rates are similar to those in Danish women and non-Inuit women from Canada respectively. Only 9 cases of placenta cancer were recorded in the Circumpolar area during the 20 years of observation. Compared with available incidence rates for Denmark the incidence in Greenland was significantly higher.
PubMed ID
8813065 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the male genital tract in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4061
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):589-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A. Prener
H H Storm
N H Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):589-93
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Genital Neoplasms, Male - epidemiology - ethnology
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Penile Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
In an international collaboration project we combined cancers of the male genital tract among Inuit identified from routine cancer registry systems in the Circumpolar region (Alaska, Canada and Greenland) and compared incidence rates with rates in Denmark, Connecticut (USA) and Canadian non-Inuit. We observed a low risk of prostate cancer (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 0.2-0.3) and the incidence rate of 7.8 per 100 000 (world standard) is among the lowest in the world. Dietary and not diagnostic factors are likely explanations of this finding. Testicular cancer also occurred with low rates (SIR 0.3-0.7) although only significantly so when compared with Denmark and Connecticut (USA) which have some of the world's highest incidence rates of this cancer. Penile cancer occurred with relatively high risk (SIR 1.8-3.0) based on rates among non-Inuit. The incidence is, however, lower than anticipated considering the possibility for shared risk factors with cancer of the uterine cervix.
PubMed ID
8813066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer of the respiratory system in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3547
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):571-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A B Miller
L A Gaudette
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):571-6
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nose Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cancer incidence of the nasal cavities in Inuit men are high (ASR=3.0 1984-1988), and higher than seen in Denmark, Connecticut (USA) and Canada. Lung cancer incidence is among the highest in the world, for both men and women, and larynx cancer among the lowest. The smoking pattern among Inuit, possibly combined with co-factors related to environment and diet, are believed to be the relevant causal factors.
PubMed ID
8813063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancers of skin, bone, connective tissues, brain, eye, thyroid and other specified and unspecified sites in Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4059
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):607-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A B Miller
L A Gaudette
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):607-16
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Connective Tissue Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Low rates of skin cancer, both melanoma and non-melanoma, were observed in Inuit after 20 years of observation. Tumours of the brain and central nervous system, of the thyroid, bone and connective tissues and other specified sites occurred with rates similar to those in comparison populations in Denmark, Connecticut and Canada. These findings support that neither UV and ionizing radiation from nuclear fall-out, nor pollution of herbicides and pesticides in the Arctic area have yet had any noticeable impact on cancer risk. However, unspecified and secondary neoplasms constitute 7-8% of the total Circumpolar cancer incidence and the pattern of rare cancers must be interpreted with caution. Increased diagnostic efforts with a higher precision in the future are warranted.
PubMed ID
8813069 View in PubMed
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Cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4064
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):545-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A P Lanier
S R Alberts
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):545-52
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lip Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Mouth Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Tongue Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
In an international collaboration, cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx were combined from cancer registries in the Circumpolar region, including Alaska, Canada and Greenland. Low risk of cancers of the lip (SIR 0.2) was observed among Inuit. Increased risk of cancer of the tongue and oral cancer (SIR 2.5) were observed among Greenlandic Inuit men. Salivary gland cancer and nasopharyngeal cancer occur among Inuit with rates among the highest in the world. Environmental factors (EBV, diet) and a genetically susceptible population are believed to play a role.
PubMed ID
8813061 View in PubMed
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.