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460 records – page 1 of 46.

The Narsaq declaration: looking back to move forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95443
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:475
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:475
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Greenhouse Effect
Sweden
PubMed ID
19205122 View in PubMed
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Source
US News World Rep. 2004 Nov 8;137(16):66-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-8-2004
Author
Petit Charles W
Source
US News World Rep. 2004 Nov 8;137(16):66-9
Date
Nov-8-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Greenhouse Effect
PubMed ID
15553494 View in PubMed
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Source
Conserv Biol. 2010 Feb;24(1):10-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Mark C Serreze
Author Affiliation
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80907, USA. serreze@kryos.colorado.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2010 Feb;24(1):10-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Greenhouse Effect
Abstract
The Earth's atmosphere has a natural greenhouse effect, without which the global mean surface temperature would be about 33 degrees C lower and life would not be possible. Human activities have increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and other gases in trace amounts. This has enhanced the greenhouse effect, resulting in surface warming. Were it not for the partly offsetting effects of increased aerosol concentrations, the increase in global mean surface temperature over the past 100 years would be larger than observed. Continued surface warming through the 21st century is inevitable and will likely have widespread ecological impacts. The magnitude and rate of warming for the global average will be largely dictated by the strength and direction of climate feedbacks, thermal inertia of the oceans, the rate of greenhouse gas emissions, and aerosol concentrations. Because of regional expressions of climate feedbacks, changes in atmospheric circulation, and a suite of other factors, the magnitude and rate of warming and changes in other key climate elements, such as precipitation, will not be uniform across the planet. For example, due to loss of its floating sea-ice cover, the Arctic will warm the most.
PubMed ID
20121837 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3165-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Kaas Eigil
Author Affiliation
Niels Bohr Instituttet, Københavns Universitet, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 København �, Denmark. kaas@gfy.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3165-8
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Abstract
This article provides a brief overview over some of the main findings in the most recent IPCC WG I report and in articles published after the report. It is argued that the conclusions in the report on observed climate variations and trends during the last 100 years have been largely confirmed or even reinforced by the most recent studies. Concerning future climate change, new analyses of possible changes in sea-level, which take melting land ice into account, indicate that the global sea level may rise as much as one meter within the present century.
PubMed ID
19857392 View in PubMed
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Source
Time. 2004 Oct 4;164(14):68-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-2004
Author
Roosevelt Margot
Source
Time. 2004 Oct 4;164(14):68-70
Date
Oct-4-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Greenhouse Effect
Implosive Therapy
PubMed ID
15503785 View in PubMed
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The 2007 Royal Colloquium, Narsaq, Greenland: in summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95441
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:517-20
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Brändström Dan
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:517-20
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Crops, Agricultural
Culture
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
PubMed ID
19205130 View in PubMed
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Source
Sci Am. 2007 Apr;296(4):16, 19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Biello David
Source
Sci Am. 2007 Apr;296(4):16, 19
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Ice Cover
PubMed ID
17479619 View in PubMed
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Recent changes in the climate: natural or forced by human activity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90090
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:483-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Wibjörn, K
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Geography, Stockholm University, Sweden. wibjorn.karlen@kultgeog.uu.se
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:483-8
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Humans
Solar Activity
Abstract
Humanity has always lived under the threat of disasters such as famine. Now that these threats have diminished considerably in the West, it seems like people need a new scare that can be shared, thereby having a uniting effect. The possible impact of an increased atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration seems to have taken over this role. However, new dating techniques and numerous new studies have now added information that can bring about a reevaluation of the opinion that it is only human activity that can explain recent climatic changes. A distinction between trends and variability in climate is only possible if long-term records can be studied. Greenland ice core data yield well-dated information about climate over an extended period that, seen together with other data series, indicates that large, probably global scale changes have occurred at numerous times in the past. The warming during the past 100 y is not likely to be unique.
PubMed ID
19205124 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Oct 23;17(20):R857-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-2007
Author
Williams Nigel
Source
Curr Biol. 2007 Oct 23;17(20):R857-8
Date
Oct-23-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
PubMed ID
17987685 View in PubMed
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AtmospheRIC science. Tipping points in the tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95768
Source
Science. 2005 Oct 28;310(5748):627-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2005
Author
Foley Jonathan A
Author Affiliation
Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE), Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53726, USA. jfoley@wisc.edu
Source
Science. 2005 Oct 28;310(5748):627-8
Date
Oct-28-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Greenhouse Effect
Models, Theoretical
Trees
Notes
Comment On: Science. 2005 Oct 28;310(5748):657-6016179434
PubMed ID
16254174 View in PubMed
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460 records – page 1 of 46.