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Anxiety and depression in adults with cystic fibrosis: a comparison between patients and the general population in Sweden and three other European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273898
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lena Backström-Eriksson
Kimmo Sorjonen
Agneta Bergsten-Brucefors
Lena Hjelte
Bo Melin
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:121
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Belgium - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive life-shortening disease among Caucasians. Studies exploring the prevalence of anxiety and depression in adult CF patients are few, show inconsistent findings and rarely include comparisons with general populations. Prevalence and degree of anxiety and depression were investigated in adult CF patients in Sweden, Belgium, Germany and the UK, and compared to corresponding general population data.
Adult non-transplanted CF patients from the three largest CF-centres (out of four) in Sweden (N = 129; Age range 18-70 years; 50 % women) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Studies using HADS in adult CF populations in the UK, Germany, and Belgium were included, as well as HADS normative data from the corresponding general populations.
No elevated risk for anxiety and depression was found among the CF patients. However, a Country x Group interaction effect emerged; CF patients experienced a higher degree of anxiety than the general population in Sweden, but not in the other countries, though this finding did not remain significant in a logistic regression analysis. In Sweden the effect was limited to women. A Country x Group interaction effect was also found for Depression; CF patients experienced lower degree of depression than the general population in Sweden, Germany and the UK, but not in Belgium/Netherlands.
Contrary to earlier outcomes, the present results do not indicate any general elevated risk for anxiety and depression among CF patients. Anxiety was slightly higher in the Swedish CF population, compared to the general population; this finding was not seen in the other countries. Depression among CF patients was lower than or similar to that in the general populations in the studied countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26466585 View in PubMed
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Association of variants in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene with polycystic ovary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157193
Source
Diabetologia. 2008 Jul;51(7):1153-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
T M Barber
A J Bennett
C J Groves
U. Sovio
A. Ruokonen
H. Martikainen
A. Pouta
A-L Hartikainen
P. Elliott
C M Lindgren
R M Freathy
K. Koch
W H Ouwehand
F. Karpe
G S Conway
J A H Wass
M-R Järvelin
S. Franks
M I McCarthy
Author Affiliation
Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7LJ, UK. tom.barber@drl.ox.ac.uk
Source
Diabetologia. 2008 Jul;51(7):1153-8
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Proteins - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
Variants in the fat-mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) influence susceptibility to type 2 diabetes via an effect on adiposity/obesity. Given the important role of obesity in the aetiology of both polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus, our aim was to establish whether FTO variants are also implicated in PCOS susceptibility.
We performed a genetic association study of FTO variant rs9939609 using case-control analyses, conducted in 463 PCOS patients (geometric mean BMI 27.5 kg/m(2)) and 1,336 female controls (geometric mean BMI 25.3 kg/m(2)) of UK British/Irish origin. We also sought evidence for associations between FTO variation and circulating testosterone levels in 324 UK PCOS patients and 1,000 women from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort of 1966. Outcome measures included FTO rs9939609 genotype frequencies by participant group and androgen measures (testosterone, free androgen index) by genotype.
There was a significant association between FTO genotype and PCOS status in the UK case-control analysis, which was attenuated by adjustment for BMI (Cochran-Armitage test, odds ratio [per minor allele copy] 1.30 [95% CI 1.12, 1.51], p = 7.2 x 10(-4) [unadjusted], p = 2.9 x 10(-3) [adjusted]). This association was most evident in obese PCOS patients (PCOS patients below median BMI vs UK controls, p = 0.11; above median BMI vs controls, p = 2.9 x 10(-4)). No relationship between FTO genotype and androgen levels was seen.
We provide the first evidence that variants that predispose to common obesity also result in altered susceptibility to PCOS, confirming the mechanistic link between these conditions. The predominant effect of FTO variants on PCOS susceptibility is probably mediated through adiposity.
PubMed ID
18478198 View in PubMed
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Audiological findings in workers exposed to styrene alone or in concert with noise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163471
Source
Noise Health. 2006 Jan-Mar;8(30):45-57
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ann-Christin Johnson
Thais C Morata
Ann-Cathrine Lindblad
Per R Nylén
Eva B Svensson
Edward Krieg
Aleksandar Aksentijevic
Deepak Prasher
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Section of Audiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technique, Alfred Nobels Allé 10, S-141 83 Stockholm, Sweden. ann-christin.johnson@ki.se
Source
Noise Health. 2006 Jan-Mar;8(30):45-57
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry
Case-Control Studies
Databases as Topic
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Hearing
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous
Questionnaires
Styrene - toxicity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Audiological testing, interviews and exposure measurements were used to collect data on the health effects of styrene exposures in 313 workers from fiberglass and metal-product manufacturing plants and a mail terminal. The audiological test battery included pure-tone audiometry, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), psychoacoustic modulation transfer function, interrupted speech, speech recognition in noise and cortical response audiometry (CRA). Workers exposed to noise and styrene had significantly poorer pure-tone thresholds in the high-frequency range (3 to 8 kHz) than the controls, noise-exposed workers and those listed in a Swedish age-specific database. Even though abnormalities were noted on DPOAE and CRA testing, the interrupted speech and speech recognition in noise tests were the more sensitive tests for styrene effects. Further research is needed on the underlying mechanisms to understand the effects of styrene and on audiological test batteries to detect changes in populations exposed to solvents.
PubMed ID
17513895 View in PubMed
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Candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms from a genomewide association study of Alzheimer disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160364
Source
Arch Neurol. 2008 Jan;65(1):45-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Hao Li
Sally Wetten
Li Li
Pamela L St Jean
Ruchi Upmanyu
Linda Surh
David Hosford
Michael R Barnes
James David Briley
Michael Borrie
Natalie Coletta
Richard Delisle
Daniella Dhalla
Margaret G Ehm
Howard H Feldman
Luis Fornazzari
Serge Gauthier
Neil Goodgame
Danilo Guzman
Sandra Hammond
Paul Hollingworth
Ging-Yuek Hsiung
Joan Johnson
Devon D Kelly
Ron Keren
Andrew Kertesz
Karen S King
Simon Lovestone
Inge Loy-English
Paul M Matthews
Michael J Owen
Mary Plumpton
William Pryse-Phillips
Rab K Prinjha
Jill C Richardson
Ann Saunders
Andrew J Slater
Peter H St George-Hyslop
Sandra W Stinnett
Jina E Swartz
Rachel L Taylor
John Wherrett
Julie Williams
David P Yarnall
Rachel A Gibson
Michael C Irizarry
Lefkos T Middleton
Allen D Roses
Author Affiliation
GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
Source
Arch Neurol. 2008 Jan;65(1):45-53
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Education
Female
France - ethnology
Genome, Human - genetics
Genotype
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with risk and age at onset of Alzheimer disease (AD) in a genomewide association study of 469 438 SNPs.
Case-control study with replication.
Memory referral clinics in Canada and the United Kingdom.
The hypothesis-generating data set consisted of 753 individuals with AD by National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria recruited from 9 memory referral clinics in Canada and 736 ethnically matched control subjects; control subjects were recruited from nonbiological relatives, friends, or spouses of the patients and did not exhibit cognitive impairment by history or cognitive testing. The follow-up data set consisted of 418 AD cases and 249 nondemented control cases from the United Kingdom Medical Research Council Genetic Resource for Late-Onset AD recruited from clinics at Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, and King's College London, London, England.
Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for association of SNPs with AD by logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, education, study site, and French Canadian ancestry (for the Canadian data set). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals from Cox proportional hazards regression for age at onset with similar covariate adjustments.
Unadjusted, SNP RS4420638 within APOC1 was strongly associated with AD due entirely to linkage disequilibrium with APOE. In the multivariable adjusted analyses, 3 SNPs within the top 120 by P value in the logistic analysis and 1 in the Cox analysis of the Canadian data set provided additional evidence for association at P
PubMed ID
17998437 View in PubMed
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Changes in prevalence of depression and anxiety following smoking cessation: results from an international cohort study (ATTEMPT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115443
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jan;44(1):127-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
L. Shahab
S. Andrew
R. West
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jan;44(1):127-41
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
France - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Smoking - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Spain - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Smoking cessation improves physical health but it has been suggested that in vulnerable individuals it may worsen mental health. This study aimed to identify the short- and longer-term effects of stopping smoking on depression and anxiety in the general population and in those with a history of these disorders.
Sociodemographic and smoking characteristics, and mental and physical health were assessed using established measures in the ATTEMPT cohort, an international longitudinal study of smokers (n = 3645). Smokers who had stopped for at least 3 months or less than 3 months at the 12-month follow-up were compared with current smokers (n = 1640).
At follow-up, 9.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.3-11.2] of smokers had stopped for less than 3 months and 7.5% (95% CI 6.3-8.9) for at least 3 months. Compared with current smokers, prevalence of depression prescriptions obtained in the last 2 weeks was lower for those who had stopped for less than 3 months [odds ratio (OR) 0.37, 95% CI 0.14-0.96] or at least 3 months (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.06-0.94) after adjusting for baseline prescription levels and confounding variables. Adjusted prevalence of recent depression symptoms was also lower for ex-smokers who had stopped for less than 3 months (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.78) or at least 3 months (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.67) than among continuing smokers. There was no change in anxiety measures in the general population or any increase in anxiety or depression symptoms in ex-smokers with a past history of these conditions.
Smoking cessation does not appear to be associated with an increase in anxiety or depression and may lead to a reduced incidence of depression.
PubMed ID
23507203 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and adult leukemia. A meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24122
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1993 Feb 22;153(4):469-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1993
Author
R C Brownson
T E Novotny
M C Perry
Author Affiliation
Missouri Department of Health, Columbia.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1993 Feb 22;153(4):469-75
Date
Feb-22-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - epidemiology
Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that certain forms of adult leukemia may be related to cigarette smoking. METHODS: To evaluate the association between cigarette smoking and adult leukemia, we conducted a meta-analysis of available studies. Data were identified through an English-language MEDLINE search for the period 1970 through 1992 and through our knowledge of ongoing and unpublished studies. Among the studies identified, the meta-analysis included seven prospective studies and eight case-control studies. The US Surgeon General's criteria were used to assess the evidence for causality. RESULTS: A positive association between smoking and certain histologic types of leukemia was found in both prospective and case-control studies. The summary smoking-related risk derived from prospective studies (relative risk, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 1.4) was greater than that based on case-control data (relative risk, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 1.2). Prospective data suggested an elevated risk of myeloid leukemia associated with cigarette smoking (relative risk, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 1.6). Pooled case-control data showed increased smoking-associated risk for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (relative risk, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 1.5). Risk of leukemia increased according to the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Population-attributable risk calculations suggested that approximately 14% of all US leukemia cases (including 17% of myeloid and 14% of acute nonlymphocytic leukemias) may be due to cigarette smoking. CONCLUSIONS: The consistency, temporality, and biologic plausibility of this relationship augment our findings, which support a causal relationship between cigarette smoking and certain forms of adult leukemia. Further studies are needed to examine risk among women, dose-response effects, and variation in risk by histologic type.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 1993 Feb 22;153(4):425-78435021
PubMed ID
8435026 View in PubMed
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Clinical epidemiology and radiology: the need to bridge the gap. Breast screening: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24359
Source
Radiology. 1992 Sep;184(3):607-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

Evaluation of severe insomnia in the general population: results of a European multinational survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52505
Source
J Psychopharmacol. 1999;13(4 Suppl 1):S21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
H. Chevalier
F. Los
D. Boichut
M. Bianchi
D J Nutt
G. Hajak
J. Hetta
G. Hoffmann
C. Crowe
Author Affiliation
helene.chevalier@sofres.worldnet.fr
Source
J Psychopharmacol. 1999;13(4 Suppl 1):S21-4
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Belgium - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The epidemiology of severe insomnia and its effect on quality of life and healthcare consumption was assessed in a survey of the general population of five northern European countries. Applying established consumer sampling techniques, insomnia sufferers were selected from the general population using a questionnaire, conducted by face-to-face interview, and severity of insomnia was ranked (severe, mild/moderate, no sleep complaint) using a specific algorithm. Population samples were matched according to case control methodology for age, gender and geographical region. A second questionnaire gathered information on sleep problems, quality of life (SF-36 scores) and healthcare consumption. The prevalence of severe insomnia ranged from 4% to 22%, was higher in females than in males, but did not increase significantly with age. Patients with severe insomnia had been experiencing sleeping problems for a median of 2-6 years. In all countries, insomnia had a negative impact on quality of life, and the degree of impairment in quality of life was directly related to the severity of insomnia. Individuals with severe insomnia also showed a higher level of healthcare consumption. Despite this, severe insomnia did not appear to feature prominently in the doctor-patient relationship.
PubMed ID
10667452 View in PubMed
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Family history and lung cancer risk: international multicentre case-control study in Eastern and Central Europe and meta-analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144752
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Jul;21(7):1091-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Jolanta Lissowska
Lenka Foretova
Joanna Dabek
David Zaridze
Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska
Peter Rudnai
Eleonora Fabianova
Adrian Cassidy
Dana Mates
Vladimir Bencko
Vladimir Janout
Rayjean J Hung
Paul Brennan
Paolo Boffetta
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, The M Sklodowska-Cure Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, WK Roentgena 5, 02-781 Warsaw, Poland. lissowsj@coi.waw.pl
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Jul;21(7):1091-104
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Family
Family Health
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Hungary - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Poland - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Romania - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Slovakia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Lung cancer is the most common neoplastic disease in Eastern and Central Europe. The role of hereditary factors in lung carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Family history (FH) of lung cancer and other tobacco-related cancers might be a strong predictor of the lung cancer risk. We investigated family history of cancer among first-degree relatives of 2,861 patients with lung cancer and 3,118 controls from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, and United Kingdom within the IARC Multicenter Case-Control Study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender, study center, education, tobacco smoking, and number of first-degree relatives. In addition, we conducted a meta-analysis of 41 studies on FH of cancer and lung cancer risk. Positive FH of lung cancer increased risk of lung cancer with OR of 1.63 (95%CI: 1.31-2.01), and having two or more affected relatives with lung cancer further increased the risk of lung cancer with OR 3.60 (95%CI: 1.56-8.31). Among subjects aged less than 50, the OR for FH of lung cancer was 2.08 (95%CI: 1.18-3.63). The associations were generally stronger for squamous cell carcinoma and large cell carcinoma subtypes. Heterogeneity in results was not found with respect to smoking status and gender. A significant association was not observed for FH of other smoking-related tumors. The results of meta-analysis were consistent with that of our study with regard to young onset, non-smokers and histology. FH of lung cancer is a predictor of an increased risk of lung cancer, especially in subjects aged less than 50.
PubMed ID
20306329 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.