Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2203 records – page 1 of 221.

[3, 4, or more. An epidemic of multiple pregnancies]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65051
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jul 10;88(28-29):2435-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-1991
Author
B S Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jul 10;88(28-29):2435-7
Date
Jul-10-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple - physiology - psychology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
1857168 View in PubMed
Less detail

25-Hydroxycholecaliferol and fractures of the proximal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252013
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1975
Author
B. Lund
O H Sorensen
A B Christensen
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Date
Aug-16-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Femoral Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Kidney - metabolism
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - complications - etiology
Phosphorus - blood
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-H.C.C.) has been measured in 67 consective cases of fracture of the proximal femur. The values found in these patients were not different from values found in these patients were not different from those in control groups at the same time of the year. Plasma 25-H.C.C. was not correlated to plasma calcium or phosphorus, the Ca times P product, or the alkaline phosphatase. X-rays showed Looser zones in only 1 patient, in whom the lowest plasma 25-H.C.C. was found. Osteomalacia is not uncommon among elderly people in Denmark, but it is more likely to depend on a decline in the renal efficiency to convert 25-H.C.C. to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol than a low dietary intake of vitamin D.
PubMed ID
50509 View in PubMed
Less detail

129I in the oceans: origins and applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6779
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Sep 30;237-238:31-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
G M Raisbeck
F. Yiou
Author Affiliation
Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay, France. raisbeck@csnsm.in2p3.fr
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1999 Sep 30;237-238:31-41
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
France
Great Britain
Iodine - analysis
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Oceans and Seas
Radioactive Tracers
Radioactive Waste - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Technetium - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Pollution, Radioactive - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The quantity of the long lived (half-life 15.7 million years) radioactive isotope 129I in the pre-nuclear age ocean was approximately 100 kg. Various nuclear related activities, including weapons testing, nuclear fuel reprocessing, Chernobyl and other authorized or non-authorized dumping of radioactive waste have increased the ocean inventory of 129I by more than one order of magnitude. The most important of these sources are the direct marine discharges from the commercial reprocessing facilities at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) which have discharged approximately 1640 kg in the English Channel, and approximately 720 kg in the Irish Sea, respectively. We discuss how this 129I can be used as both a 'pathway' and 'transit time' tracer in the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans, as well as a parameter for distinguishing between reprocessed and non-reprocessed nuclear waste in the ocean, and as a proxy for the transport and dilution of other soluble pollutants input to the North Sea.
PubMed ID
10568263 View in PubMed
Less detail

[2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The Nobel laureates have explored the internal GPS of the brain].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262625
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Oct 8-14;111(41):1766-7
Publication Type
Article

Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion, 1973: some recent world events in relation to pregnancy termination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66364
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1974
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Date
Jun-1-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Americas
Developed Countries
Europe
Europe, Eastern
Family Planning Services
France
Germany, East
Germany, West
Great Britain
Italy
Netherlands
North America
Norway
Scandinavia
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This selective report notes recent events relating to pregnancy termination in the U.S., France, England, Italy, East and West Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands. Due to the Supreme Court decision in January 1973, abortion is now legal in the U.S. Although abortions is illegal in France, an estimated 400,000-1,000,000 clandestine abortions occur each year. Although abortions are legal in Britain, the ease with which they can be obtained varies regionally. As of March 1973, contraceptives are part of Britain's National Health Service. In Italy, a bill to legalize abortion has been introduced in Parliament, though there is little likelihood of its passing. In East Germany, abortion can be granted for medical or social reasons, while in West Germany, the governmental policies are more conservative, resulting in an abundance of illegal abortions performed by physicians. There is a trend toward easier abortion laws in Norway and Sweden. Little is happening in the Netherlands as far as liberalizing the abortion laws. Rather liberal grounds for pregnancy termination exist in China (though emphasis is on contraception), India, Russia, and Eastern Europe (with the exception of Romania). Abortion is frowned upon in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East resulting in a large number of illegal abortions. It is concluded that there is liberalized abortion in communist bloc countries, there is trend toward liberalizing abortion in a large group of western countries, and tradition and religion are responsible for conservative abortion laws in a third group of countries.
PubMed ID
12333737 View in PubMed
Less detail

2203 records – page 1 of 221.