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Drug misuse in sport: a historical perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274227
Source
N Z Med J. 2015 Dec 4;128(1426):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-4-2015
Author
David Gerrard
Source
N Z Med J. 2015 Dec 4;128(1426):16-8
Date
Dec-4-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Doping in Sports - ethics - history
Federal Government - history
Germany, East
Government Programs - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Performance-Enhancing Substances - history
Russia
Sports - ethics - history
Abstract
This editorial draws comparisons between the recent revelations of drug misuse in Russian sport, and the State-sponsored programme of the former German Democratic Republic. While 50 years separates these two regimes, there are commonalities. The history of major incidents involving drug abuse by serious national players in sport suggests a 20-year cycle, with the GDR, China and now Russia employing similar strategies. These events underscore the value placed upon international sporting success by politicians.
PubMed ID
26913904 View in PubMed
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From administrative infrastructure to biomedical resource: Danish population registries, the "Scandinavian laboratory," and the "epidemiologist's dream".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104163
Source
Sci Context. 2014 Jun;27(2):187-213
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014

Re-evaluating Russia's biological weapons policy, as reflected in the Criminal Code and Official Admissions: insubordination leading to a president's subordination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169816
Source
Crit Rev Microbiol. 2006;32(1):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jan T Knoph
Kristina S Westerdahl
Author Affiliation
Defence Analysis, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden. knoph@foi.se
Source
Crit Rev Microbiol. 2006;32(1):1-13
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthrax - epidemiology
Biological Warfare - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Bioterrorism - legislation & jurisprudence
Disease Outbreaks - history
Government Programs - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Public Policy
Russia
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
Half-heartedly acknowledged by the Russian Federation, the Soviet Union ran the world's largest offensive program for biological weapons, breaching the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention. Russia criminalized biological weapons in 1993 only to decriminalize them in 1996, but in 2003 president Putin partly recriminalized them. None of these changes were declared within the Convention. Several well-known official statements, when reviewed in their context, turned out to admit to neither an offensive program nor a breach of the Convention. Thus, the Russian biological weapons policy is more ambiguous than usually depicted, and various policy shapers can be discerned.
PubMed ID
16610333 View in PubMed
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