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2072 records – page 1 of 208.

15. Canadian experience with patient care classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251109
Source
Med Care. 1976 May;14(5 Suppl):134-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976
Author
J A MacDonell
Source
Med Care. 1976 May;14(5 Suppl):134-7
Date
May-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Canada
Classification
Costs and Cost Analysis
Financing, Government
Humans
Insurance, Health
Long-Term Care
Nursing Care
Patient Care Planning
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Patient care classification in Canada in the past has been largely dictated by insurance coverage and the fiscal policies of the individual provinces. In recent years, however, the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare has been promoting the development of a standard patient care classification based on assessment of client or patient needs in regard to the category, type, and level of care. Experimentation with the proposed classification system in several provinces confirms the need in long-term care to include assessment of nursing requirements, physical functioning, and psychosocial assets and liabilities, and points to the importance of using such a classification for planning and evaluating patient care as well as for administrative purposes.
PubMed ID
819730 View in PubMed
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1986 and beyond. A look into the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236215
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
C. Stavrakaki
B. Vargo
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Criminal Law
Financing, Government
Human Rights
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Jurisprudence
Marriage
Social Justice
Sterilization
United States
Abstract
Recent research in the field of mental retardation has pointed to a better-defined population with exacting prevalence of the basic pathology and related disabilities. Advances in the areas of prevention and treatment have further reduced the prevalence and incidence of mental retardation. Current legislation and legislative procedures have led to a more equitable and fairer application of human rights to all citizens. However, discrepancies and ambiguities still remain with respect to interpretation of the spirit of the law as related to the retarded. Financial restraints and serious economic hardship have impacted on social and political attitudes and created two-tier systems of the rich and poor with the retarded referred to as "surplus population." This situation has, in turn, influenced the availability of resources, manpower, training, and research in this field. The future could be brighter if sociologic and philosophic changes parallel technologic advances. It is our duty and commitment to continue and further the developments in all spheres relevant to the retarded in order to maximize human potential whenever possible.
PubMed ID
3809000 View in PubMed
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2004 Gold Book Buyer's Guide. Government agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181526
Source
Emerg Med Serv. 2003 Dec;32(12):259-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Source
Emerg Med Serv. 2003 Dec;32(12):259-70
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emergency medical services
Government Agencies
Humans
United States
PubMed ID
14964266 View in PubMed
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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University
Language
Danish
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Denmark / Greenland
Universities
Publications
Research
Knowledge
Abstract
Aarhus University is an academically diverse and strongly research-oriented institution that creates and shares knowledge. The site includes a researcher database with abstracts and publications.
Online Resources
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Aboriginal children suffer while governments ignore Jordan's Principle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126413
Source
CMAJ. 2012 May 15;184(8):853
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2012
Author
Noni E MacDonald
Source
CMAJ. 2012 May 15;184(8):853
Date
May-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Delivery of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence
State Government
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Aug 14;177(4):321, 32317698813
PubMed ID
22392942 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health programming under siege, critics charge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120994
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2012
Author
Paul Christopher Webster
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Date
Oct-2-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Federal Government
Financial Management - economics
Health Services Research - economics
Health Services, Indigenous - economics
Humans
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2012 Oct 16;184(15):1715-6; author reply 171623073677
PubMed ID
22949561 View in PubMed
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2072 records – page 1 of 208.