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2004 Canadian sexually transmitted infections surveillance report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162588
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2007 May;33 Suppl 1:1-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007

Acquired macrolide resistance genes in pathogenic Neisseria spp. isolated between 1940 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182672
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Sydney Cousin
William L H Whittington
Marilyn C Roberts
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Genotype
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Methyltransferases - genetics
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - genetics
Neisseria meningitidis - drug effects - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Time Factors
Abstract
Seventy-six Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, isolated between 1940 and 1987, and seven Neisseria meningitidis isolates, isolated between 1963 and 1987, were screened for the presence of acquired mef(A), erm(B), erm(C), and erm(F) genes by using DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR analysis, and sequencing. The mef(A), erm(B), and erm(F) genes were all identified in a 1955 N. gonorrhoeae isolate, while the erm(C) gene was identified in a 1963 N. gonorrhoeae isolate. Similarly, both the mef(A) and erm(F) genes were identified in a 1963 N. meningitidis isolate. All four acquired genes were found in later isolates of both species. The mef(A) gene from a 1975 N. gonorrhoeae isolate was sequenced and had 100% DNA and amino acid identity with the mef(A) gene from a 1990s Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate. Selected early isolates were able to transfer their acquired genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, suggesting that these genes are associated with conjugative transposons. These isolates are the oldest of any species to carry the mef(A) gene and among the oldest to carry these erm genes.
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1999 Sep;43(9):2335-610577352
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1999 Dec;43(12):2823-3010582867
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Apr;38(4):1575-8010747146
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2000 Jun;181(6):2080-210837198
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2000 Sep;44(9):2503-610952602
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2000 Sep;44(9):2585-710952626
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Jun;91(6):959-6411392941
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 2001 Sep;28(9):521-611518869
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2002 Sep;46(9):3020-512183262
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Jan;51(1):131-312493797
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Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1997 Jul;41(7):1598-6009210693
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Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1961 Jun;37:145-5713741074
PubMed ID
14638497 View in PubMed
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Acute pelvic inflammatory disease in outpatients: association with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243976
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1981 Dec;95(6):685-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
W R Bowie
H. Jones
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1981 Dec;95(6):685-8
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Ambulatory Care
British Columbia
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
Humans
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - etiology
Abstract
Among 830 women attending a clinic for sexually transmitted disease, Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 180 (22%) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae from 84 (10%). Retrospective analysis showed that 43 of the women were given outpatient treatment for acute pelvic inflammatory disease because they had low abdominal pain, deep dyspareunia, or unusual vaginal bleeding, or all of these, for less than 2 months in association with cervical motion or adnexal tenderness, or both. None had adnexal masses. C. trachomatis was isolated from 22 and N. gonorrhoeae from 15 of this subgroup of 43 women. This presentation of pelvic inflammatory disease occurred in 10 of the 37 women in the whole study with both C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, 12 of 143 women with C. trachomatis alone, five of 47 women with N. gonorrhoeae alone, and 16 of 603 women with neither organism. Thus, in North America, C. trachomatis is associated with a syndrome usually diagnosed as mild pelvic inflammatory disease and managed on an outpatient basis.
PubMed ID
7305145 View in PubMed
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AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases in the arctic regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1681
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1990; 49 Suppl 3:1-38. Proceedings of the Circumpolar Meeting on AIDS Prevention, Ilulissat, Greenland, September 26-28, 1989.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1990; 49 Suppl 3:1-38. Proceedings of the Circumpolar Meeting on AIDS Prevention, Ilulissat, Greenland, September 26-28, 1989.
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
AIDS
HIV
Population
Syphilis
Gonorrhea
Homosexuality
Health education
STD
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Sexual Behavior
Syphilis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1891.
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AIDS related changes in pattern of sexually transmitted disease (STD) in an STD clinic in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8592
Source
Genitourin Med. 1988 Aug;64(4):270-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
C S Petersen
J. Søndergaard
G L Wantzin
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatovenereology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Genitourin Med. 1988 Aug;64(4):270-2
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Herpes Genitalis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Syphilis - epidemiology
Abstract
Testing for antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was introduced in 1984 in this major sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Copenhagen, which is attended by about 10,000 new patients each year. From 1984 to 1987 the proportion of patients examined for antibodies to HIV rose from 6% to 32%. The overall incidence of HIV antibody positivity decreased from 30% in 1984 to 3% in 1987, the combined result of decreased positivity in high risk patients tested and increased screening in low risk patients. HIV antibody positivity has been confined largely to homosexual men and drug addicts. Since 1985, however, 21 out of 2623 (0.8%) heterosexuals who were not drug addicts were found to be HIV antibody positive. During 1984-6 the incidence of STDs most often encountered in high risk groups (syphilis and gonorrhoea) decreased by 64% and 41% respectively, whereas the incidence of diseases most often diagnosed in low risk groups (condylomata acuminata and genital herpes) increased by 70% and 34% respectively in the same period. The addition of HIV infection to the list of STDs requires the allocation of more resources to the STD clinics to enable these clinics to handle this new problem. Screening for all patients attending an STD clinic for antibodies to HIV must be considered, and in our area it would be cost effective.
PubMed ID
3169758 View in PubMed
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Alcohol problems among female gonorrhoea patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13234
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1976;4(3):141-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
A. Medhus
H. Hansson
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1976;4(3):141-3
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Social Control, Formal
Sweden
Abstract
The proband group consists of the 286 women who, in 1960, were treated for gonorrhoea in the Out-patient Clinic for Venereological Diseases in Malmö. During the years 1932 and 1973, they were responsible for 119 convictions for drunkeness, the expected number of convictions being 4, as calculated from an age- and calendar year specific risk table for Swedish women. The difference between numbers observed and those expected increased with age. Of the 82 patients aged 25 years or over in 1960, one in ten had previously been convicted for drunkenness, and one in seven, 13 years later. During the years 1939 to 1973, 12 gonorrhoea patients were subjected to compulsory treatment by the Temperance Boards. Of the patients aged 15 years or over in 1960, one in twenty had earlier been subjected to such treatment, and one in ten, 13 years later. It is concluded that gonorrhoeal infections, particularly in women 25 years and over, can constitute a "symptom" of alcohol problems.
PubMed ID
996474 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Ontario, Canada, with decreased susceptibility to quinolones by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, auxotyping, serotyping and plasmid content.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208613
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1997 May;46(5):383-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
N. Harnett
S. Brown
G. Riley
R. Terro
C. Krishnan
M. Pauzé
K H Yeung
Author Affiliation
Central Public Health Laboratory, Ontario Ministry of Health, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1997 May;46(5):383-90
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - classification - drug effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Plasmids
Restriction Mapping
Serotyping
Abstract
The incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced susceptibility to quinolones increased from 0.18% (63 of 3285) in 1992 to 0.56% (15 of 2663) in 1993 and 0.62% (46 of 2846) in 1994. In all, 65 of the 67 isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with decreased susceptibility to quinolones were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), auxotyping, serotyping and plasmid content. The strains were distributed among 14 auxotype/serovar (A/S) classes. Thirty isolates (46.2%) which were penicillin-susceptible with ciprofloxacin MIC90 of 0.12 mg/L and norfloxacin MIC90 of 1.0 mg/L belonged to a single A/S class, OUHL/IA-2. All but two of the 30 isolates had identical PFGE restriction profiles with NheI restriction endonuclease. Fifteen isolates (23.1%) with MICs in the intermediate (or resistant) categories for penicillin and with ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin MIC90 of 0.25 and 4.0 mg/L and (0.5 and 4.0 mg/L) respectively, belonged to A/S class P/IB-1. The 15 isolates showed nine different patterns with NheI and eight patterns with SpeI restriction endonucleases. Two of three beta-lactamase-producing (PPNG) isolates belonged to A/S class P/IB-5 and had a dissimilar PFGE restriction profile with NheI endonuclease; the other isolate belonged to A/S class P/IB-8. The remaining 17 isolates were distributed among 11 A/S classes. Three isolates within the common A/S class NR/IB-1 were subdivided into two types by PFGE as were three isolates belonging to A/S class NR/IB-2. Overall the 65 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were distributed into 30 NheI and 26 SpeI macrorestriction profiles. All but one isolate harboured the 2.6-MDa cryptic plasmid and 18 isolates carried the 24.5-MDa transferable plasmid. The three PPNG isolates carried the 4.5-MDa Asian beta-lactamase-producing plasmid and a 25.2-MDa conjugative plasmid was found in the two TRNG isolates.
PubMed ID
9152033 View in PubMed
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Analysis of serovar distribution as a tool in epidemiological studies in gonorrhoea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237936
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1986;66(4):325-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
A K Rudén
M. Bäckman
S. Bygdeman
A. Jonsson
O. Ringertz
E. Sandström
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1986;66(4):325-33
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Epitopes - analysis
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - classification - isolation & purification
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
During one year 738 gonococcal isolates from 731 consecutive patients with gonorrhoea were collected and classified by co-agglutination using W I and W II/III specific monoclonal antibodies. Eight W I and 30 W II/III serovars (serovariants) were seen. In both serogroups the most frequent serovar among isolates from women and heterosexual men differed from that among isolates from homosexual men. Forty-two per cent of the serovars, were confined only to one subpopulation, i.e. women, heterosexual men or homosexual men, representing 19 (3%) of the 738 isolates. Out of these 19 isolates 42% were acquired abroad compared with 12% of the 653 isolates in the serovars shared between two or all three subpopulations (p less than 0.005). Imported W I isolates were often of the same serovar that dominated in Stockholm. W II/III isolates acquired abroad were often of unusual serovars (p less than 0.0005) and might be a source of future changes of the serovar pattern in Sweden. In this way we can follow the introduction of new serovars into our society and their circulation between the subpopulations.
PubMed ID
2430404 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological approach to sexually transmitted diseases--with special reference to contact tracing and screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8297
Source
Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1991;157:1-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
K. Ramstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-Venereology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1991;157:1-45
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contact Tracing
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) are a major health problem all over the world. The diseases are often spread by unsuspecting asymptomatic individuals. One important means of controlling STD is thus the identification of asymptomatic persons. The purposes of this thesis were a) to describe methods of identifying infected individuals through contact tracing and screening, b) to evaluate contact tracing routines, c) to compare epidemiological characteristics of two different groups of chlamydia-infected women and their partners and d) to see if data from contact tracing could be used in a model describing partner choice and STD spread. A microepidemic of penicillinase-producing gonococci was effectively controlled through contact tracing by cooperating counsellors. Serotyping of gonococci and graphic description proved of great help in mapping the contact chain. Contact tracing integrated in the psychosocial long-term care of HIV-infected patients resulted in identification of a great number of previously unidentified individuals. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) among asymptomatic patients of family planning clinics revealed a 7.3% Ct prevalence. Four factors were significantly correlated to the risk of being infected: age 18-23, duration of present relationship less than 1 year, failure to use condoms and no previous history of genital infection. Abstention from testing was especially high in areas with low socio-economic status. In these areas, increased resources for health care are needed. Five different levels of management of Ct infections were compared. Increased measures to verify that reported partners were examined decreased reinfections and after Ct was included in the STD Act more reported partners than before came for examination. Index patients found by chlamydia screening and their partners have a lower average number of recent partners than index patients visiting an STD clinic and their partners. Partners of female patients in the STD clinic group were also more often Ct-positive. The differences between the groups are small and do not justify different ambitions in partner management. Choice of steady partner was rather restricted and choice of casual partner followed a more random pattern. Our data thus do not support a pure random mixing model for STD spread.
PubMed ID
1927207 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological survey of chlamydial and gonococcal infections in a Canadian arctic community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90552
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Feb;36(2):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Steenbeek Audrey
Tyndall Mark
Sheps Samuel
Rothenberg Richard
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, NS, Canada. a.steenbeek@dal.ca
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Feb;36(2):79-83
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contact Tracing
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Prevalence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections are leading causes of morbidity for Canadian Aboriginal women. To date, very few initiatives have been successful in screening, treating, and limiting these infections among these populations. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of universal screening, treatment and contact tracing as a means of capturing a more accurate count of chlamydia and gonorrhea prevalence and limiting transmission among Inuit communities. METHODS: 181 participants were screened for chlamydia and gonorrhea and interviewed in a cross-sectional survey (Aug-Sept/03). Information was collected on demographics, use of health services, sexual histories and STI knowledge among others. A random sample (n = 100) from the cross-sectional group was selected for the longitudinal cohort. Individuals were followed every two months post baseline for four visits (Oct/03-May/04). At each visit, participants were screened for chlamydia/gonorrhea. All positive cases and their partners were treated and contact tracing completed. Logistic Regression analysis and the McNemar Test of Correlated Proportions were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Overall, 35 cases of chlamydia were detected, with 21 detected at baseline and 14 during follow-up. The baseline prevalence was 11.6% in comparison with 2.7% that was previously estimated. No gonorrhea was detected. The strongest factor associated with a positive chlamydia was having recent STI (OR 9.82, CI: 2.70, 35.77). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the literature, the results support the use of universal screening followed by prompt treatment and contact tracing in populations with greater than 10% chlamydia prevalence.
PubMed ID
19125145 View in PubMed
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211 records – page 1 of 22.