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Accelerated pubertal development in patients with shunted hydrocephalus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34773
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1996 Jun;74(6):490-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
T. Löppönen
A L Saukkonen
W. Serlo
P. Tapanainen
A. Ruokonen
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1996 Jun;74(6):490-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Breast - growth & development
Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonadotropins, Pituitary - blood
Humans
Hydrocephalus - complications - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Menarche - physiology
Puberty - physiology
Puberty, Precocious - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Testis - growth & development
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pubertal development and peripheral concentrations of gonadotrophins and sex hormones in children with shunted hydrocephalus compared with healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN: 114 patients (52 females, 62 males) and 73 healthy controls (35 females, 38 males) aged 5 to 20 years were analysed for stage of puberty, age at menarche, testicular volume, basal serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone and oestradiol concentrations, and free androgen index. RESULTS: Male gonadal and male and female pubic hair development occurred significantly earlier in the patients than in the controls. The mean age at menarche was significantly lower in the female patients than in their controls (11.7 v 13.2 years; p
PubMed ID
8758123 View in PubMed
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Activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis is increased prior to the onset of spawning migration of chum salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90768
Source
J Exp Biol. 2009 Jan;212(Pt 1):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Onuma Takeshi A
Sato Shunpei
Katsumata Hiroshi
Makino Keita
Hu Weiwei
Jodo Aya
Davis Nancy D
Dickey Jon T
Ban Masatoshi
Ando Hironori
Fukuwaka Masa-Aki
Azumaya Tomonori
Swanson Penny
Urano Akihisa
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan. takeshikiai@msn.com
Source
J Exp Biol. 2009 Jan;212(Pt 1):56-70
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, beta Subunit - metabolism
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonads - metabolism - physiology
Haplotypes - genetics
Microarray Analysis
Oncorhynchus keta - physiology
Pacific Ocean
Pituitary Gland - metabolism - physiology
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Radioimmunoassay
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sexual Behavior, Animal - physiology
Abstract
The activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis (PG axis) in pre-migratory and homing chum salmon was examined because endocrine mechanisms underlying the onset of spawning migration remain unknown. Pre-migratory fish were caught in the central Bering Sea in June, July and September 2001, 2002 and 2003, and in the Gulf of Alaska in February 2006. They were classified into immature and maturing adults on the basis of gonadal development. The maturing adults commenced spawning migration to coastal areas by the end of summer, because almost all fish in the Bering Sea were immature in September. In the pituitaries of maturing adults, the copy numbers of FSHbeta mRNA and the FSH content were 2.5- to 100-fold those of the immature fish. Similarly, the amounts of LHbeta mRNA and LH content in the maturing adults were 100- to 1000-fold those of immature fish. The plasma levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and estradiol were higher than 10 nmol l(-1) in maturing adults, but lower than 1.0 nmol l(-1) in immature fish. The increase in the activity of the PG-axis components had already initiated in the maturing adults while they were still in the Gulf of Alaska in winter. In the homing adults, the pituitary contents and the plasma levels of gonadotropins and plasma sex steroid hormones peaked during upstream migration from the coast to the natal hatchery. The present results thus indicate that the seasonal increase in the activity of the PG axis is an important endocrine event that is inseparable from initiation of spawning migration of chum salmon.
PubMed ID
19088211 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of psychosocial stress on gonadal function and insulin levels in middle-aged males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11406
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 May;237(5):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
P M Nilsson
L. Møller
K. Solstad
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Centre, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 May;237(5):479-86
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Genitalia, Male - physiopathology
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Stress, Psychological - blood - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. To investigate the relationship between gonadal function, insulin and psychosocial stress in middle-aged men. DESIGN. A population-based, cross-sectional, observational study. SETTING. Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS. Four hundred and thirty-nine males, all aged 51 years. MAIN VARIABLES. Body-mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), insulin, C-peptide, free testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), lipids, fibrinogen, lung function tests (FVC, FEV1, PEF), blood pressure, a self-administered questionnaire with questions on psychosocial variables, lifestyle and self-rated health. RESULTS. Free testosterone correlated inversely (P
PubMed ID
7738488 View in PubMed
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Ambient temperature effects on photo induced gonadal cycles and hormonal secretion patterns in Great Tits from three different breeding latitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95553
Source
Horm Behav. 2008 Jun;54(1):60-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Silverin Bengt
Wingfield John
Stokkan Karl-Arne
Massa Renato
Järvinen Antero
Andersson Nils-Ake
Lambrechts Marcel
Sorace Alberto
Blomqvist Donald
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, University of Göteborg, Sweden. bengt.silverin@zool.gu.se
Source
Horm Behav. 2008 Jun;54(1):60-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Geography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood - secretion
Gonads - metabolism - physiology
Light
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Passeriformes - blood - metabolism - physiology
Photoperiod
Reproduction - physiology
Seasons
Temperature
Testis - anatomy & histology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
The present study determines how populations of Great Tits (Parus major) breeding in southern, mid and northern European latitudes have adjusted their reproductive endocrinology to differences in the ambient temperature during the gonadal cycle. A study based on long-term breeding data, using the Colwell predictability model, showed that the start of the breeding season has a high predictability ( approximately 0.8-0.9) at all latitudes, and that the environmental information factor (I(e)) progressively decreased from mid Italy (I(e)>4) to northern Finland (I(e)
PubMed ID
18402961 View in PubMed
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Androgens and glucuronidated androgen metabolites are associated with metabolic risk factors in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84904
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Nov;92(11):4130-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Vandenput Liesbeth
Mellström Dan
Lorentzon Mattias
Swanson Charlotte
Karlsson Magnus K
Brandberg John
Lönn Lars
Orwoll Eric
Smith Ulf
Labrie Fernand
Ljunggren Osten
Tivesten Asa
Ohlsson Claes
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Gothenburg University, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Nov;92(11):4130-7
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - anatomy & histology
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Androgens - blood
Arm - anatomy & histology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Glucuronates - blood
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Leg - anatomy & histology
Leptin - blood
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
CONTEXT: Androgens are associated with metabolic risk factors in men. However, the independent impact of androgens and androgen metabolites on metabolic risk factors in men is unclear. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine the predictive value of serum levels of androgens and glucuronidated androgen metabolites for metabolic risk factors. DESIGN AND STUDY SUBJECTS: We conducted a population-based study of two Swedish cohorts (1,068 young adult and 1,001 elderly men). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured correlation of serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT), testosterone (T), and glucuronidated androgen metabolites with fat mass, fat distribution, serum lipids, and insulin resistance. RESULTS: Both DHT and T were negatively associated with different measures of fat mass in both cohorts (P
PubMed ID
17711928 View in PubMed
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Annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black (Ursus americanus) and polar (Ursus maritimus) bears.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65412
Source
Biol Reprod. 1988 Jun;38(5):1044-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
S S Palmer
R A Nelson
M A Ramsay
I. Stirling
J M Bahr
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801.
Source
Biol Reprod. 1988 Jun;38(5):1044-50
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Carnivora - physiology
Climate
Cold Climate
Estradiol - blood
Female
Food
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Hibernation
Male
Periodicity
Pregnancy
Progesterone - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Seasons
Testosterone - blood
Ursidae - blood - physiology
Abstract
The adaptation of black and polar bears to their environments is proportional to the severity of climate and food restriction. Both black and polar bears mate during the spring, despite differences in their recent metabolic state. Reproductive activity in black bears follows 4 mo of torpor, whereas reproduction in polar bears occurs prior to torpor. The goals of this study were to measure the annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black and polar bears, and to determine if changes in serum levels of these steroids were associated with metabolic condition or photoperiod. Serum testosterone (T) concentrations were elevated during spring in black and polar bears. Moreover, this increase in serum T in polar bears during spring was correlated with age and testis size. Serum progesterone (P4) concentrations increased in pregnant polar bears in fall coincident with the time of expected implantation. No increases in serum P4 were observed in nonpregnant black and polar bears. Serum estradiol (E2) was elevated in nonpregnant and pregnant polar bears 2 mo prior to the time of expected implantation. We found that serum sex steroids measured in black and polar bears change independent of torpor. Therefore, our results suggest that photoperiod may be a more important regulator of serum steroid levels and reproduction than metabolic condition.
PubMed ID
3408772 View in PubMed
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Associations between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE and hormone levels in serum in middle-aged and elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82598
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Oct;65(3):375-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Rylander Lars
Wallin Ewa
Jönssson Bo A G
Stridsberg Mats
Erfurth Eva Marie
Hagmar Lars
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Oct;65(3):375-81
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - blood
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Habits
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonadotropins - blood
Hormones - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Questionnaires
Sweden
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Animal and epidemiologic data indicate that exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) may disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. We have assessed whether the POP-biomarkers 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethene (p,p'-DDE) affect thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones, gonadotropins or sex hormone concentrations in men. METHODS: Lipid adjusted serum concentrations of CB-153, and p,p'-DDE, were determined in 196 men (median age 59 years, range 48-82). Hormone analyses in serum were performed with immunoassays. The effect of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE (as continuous or categorized variables) were evaluated by linear regression models, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: There was a significant positive association between p,p'-DDE and TSH. An increase of 100 ng/g lipid of p,p'-DDE corresponded to an increase of 0.03 mU/l (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.01, 0.05) in TSH level. The explanatory value (R(2)) of the multivariate model was only 7%. Moreover, there was a significant negative association between p,p'-DDE and estradiol. An increase of 100 ng/g lipid of p,p'-DDE corresponded to a decrease of 0.57 pmol/l (95% CI -1.0, -0.12) in estradiol level. The R(2)-value was only 4%. No associations were observed between any of the POP biomarkers and the other hormones. CONCLUSIONS: The positive association between p,p'-DDE and TSH and the negative association between p,p'-DDE and estradiol, among middle-aged and elderly men, were not accompanied by associations between the POP-markers and thyroxin, testosterone, and gonadotropins, respectively. The results gives some additional support for that POP exposure may affect HPT- and HPG-axes also in humans, but the overall epidemiological data are still not coherent enough to allow any firm conclusions.
PubMed ID
16554082 View in PubMed
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Associations of in utero exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids with human semen quality and reproductive hormones in adult men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116786
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Apr;121(4):453-8, 458e1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Anne Vested
Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen
Sjurdur Frodi Olsen
Jens Peter Bonde
Susanne Lund Kristensen
Thorhallur Ingi Halldorsson
Georg Becher
Line Småstuen Haug
Emil Hagen Ernst
Gunnar Toft
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. anneveed@rm.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Apr;121(4):453-8, 458e1-5
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Caprylates - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Endocrine Disruptors - blood
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Luminescent Measurements
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Semen - drug effects - physiology
Semen Analysis
Sperm Count
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Testis - anatomy & histology - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because they readily cross the placental barrier, in utero exposure may be a cause for concern.
We investigated whether in utero exposure to PFOA and PFOS affects semen quality, testicular volume, and reproductive hormone levels.
We recruited 169 male offspring (19-21 years of age) from a pregnancy cohort established in Aarhus, Denmark, in 1988-1989, corresponding to 37.6% of the eligible sons. Each man provided a semen sample and a blood sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, total sperm count, motility, and morphology, and blood samples were used to measure reproductive hormones. As a proxy for in utero exposure, PFOA and PFOS were measured in maternal blood samples from pregnancy week 30.
Multivariable linear regression analysis suggested that in utero exposure to PFOA was associated with lower adjusted sperm concentration (ptrend = 0.01) and total sperm count (ptrend = 0.001) and with higher adjusted levels of luteinizing hormone (ptrend = 0.03) and follicle-stimulating hormone (ptrend = 0.01). PFOS did not appear to be associated with any of the outcomes assessed, before or after adjustment.
The results suggest that in utero exposure to PFOA may affect adult human male semen quality and reproductive hormone levels.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23360585 View in PubMed
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Body mass index in relation to semen quality and reproductive hormones among 1,558 Danish men

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9365
Source
Fertil Steril. 2004 Oct;82(4):863-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jensen, TK
Andersson, A-M
Jørgensen, N
Andersen, A-G
Carlsen, E
Petersen, JM
Skakkebaek, NE
Author Affiliation
University Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2004 Oct;82(4):863-70
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estradiol - blood
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Linear Models
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Semen - physiology
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Smoking
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility - physiology
Testis - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Urban Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality among young men from the general population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish young men were approached when they attended a compulsory physical examination to determine their fitness for military service. PATIENT(S): From 1996-1998, 1,558 (19%) young men (mean age 19 years) volunteered. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Semen volume (in milliliters), sperm concentration (in million per milliliter), percentage of motile spermatozoa, percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology, total sperm count (in million), and testis size (in milliliters). In addition, serum reproductive hormones were measured. RESULT(S): Serum T, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and inhibin B all decreased with increasing BMI, whereas free androgen index and E(2) increased with increasing BMI. Serum FSH was higher among slim men. After control for confounders, men with a BMI 25 kg/m(2) had a reduction in sperm concentration and total sperm count of 21.6% (95% CI 4.0%-39.4%) and 23.9% (95% CI 4.7%-43.2%), respectively, compared to men with BMI between 20-25 kg/m(2). Percentages of normal spermatozoa were reduced, although not significantly, among men with high or low BMI. Semen volume and percentage of motile spermatozoa were not affected by BMI. CONCLUSION(S): High or low BMI was associated with reduced semen quality. It remains to be seen whether the increasing occurrence of obesity in the Western world may contribute to an epidemic of poor semen quality registered in some of the same countries. If so, some cases of subfertility may be preventable.
PubMed ID
15482761 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.