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A 10 year follow up of parenteral gold therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14307
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
G. Bendix
A. Bjelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Tolerance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the long term tolerance of parenteral gold and subsequent drug treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including prediction of outcome and 'survival' of sequential treatments. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 376 patients was made, including a detailed screening of 237 patients treated in 1989. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were analysed in life table analyses, which were used to compare patients receiving parenteral gold treatment in 1985 and 1989, and two groups of patients receiving disease modifying antirheumatic drugs after parenteral gold treatment. The causes of discontinuation were followed in sequential treatments. RESULTS: The estimated probability of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment was 29% after six months and 42%, 55%, 74%, and 92% after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Mucocutaneous side effects were the main cause of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment during the first three years, while the probability of discontinuation because of inefficacy dominated after four years. Side effects also constituted the main cause of discontinuation of treatments given after parenteral gold treatment during the first three years of follow up. No significant differences were found when comparing the termination rates between the first and the second and subsequent treatments after parenteral gold treatment. The main reasons for discontinuing one treatment could not predict the cause of discontinuation of the next treatment. CONCLUSION: Mucocutaneous side effects dominated initially, while inefficacy was the dominating cause of discontinuation of long term parenteral gold treatment. No serious side effects were registered. The cause of discontinuation of one treatment did not predict the cause of discontinuation of the following drug. Drug 'survival' was the same in both treatments after parenteral gold treatment.
PubMed ID
8712879 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A. Jokstad
I A Mjör
V. Qvist
Author Affiliation
Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Composite Resins - chemistry
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Amalgam - chemistry
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Glass Ionomer Cements - chemistry
Gold Alloys - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Middle Aged
Scandinavia
Time Factors
Abstract
In a cross-sectional survey the age of restorations in situ was recorded in three patient groups. Group A were randomly examined regular attenders, group B were irregular attenders randomly chosen from patient treatment records, and in group C the age of posterior gold and composite resin restorations was recorded in selected regular attenders. The study material included 8310 restorations in group A, 1281 in group B, and 500 restorations in group C. The three materials amalgam, composite, and gold accounted for more than 90% of all restorations. In group A 3.3% of the restorations were scheduled for replacement. The most prevalent reasons for replacement were secondary caries, bulk fractures of the restoration, and tooth fractures. The median age of the failed restorations was fairly similar to the median age of the acceptable restorations in situ among the regular patients (group A). The data indicate median ages of 20 years for gold restorations, 12-14 years for amalgam restorations, and 7-8 years for composite resin restorations. The restoration ages were influenced by the type and size of the restoration, the restorative material used, and possibly also the intra-oral location of the restorations.
PubMed ID
7985509 View in PubMed
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Arsenic mobility and characterization in lakes impacted by gold ore roasting, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292468
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Martin D Van Den Berghe
Heather E Jamieson
Michael J Palmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University, 36 Union St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, 3651 Trousdale Pkwy, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. Electronic address: mdvanden@usc.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenicals - analysis
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gold
Lakes - analysis
Mining
Oxides - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The controls on the mobility and fate of arsenic in lakes impacted by historical gold ore roasting in northern Canada have been examined. A detailed characterization of arsenic solid and aqueous phases in lake waters, lake sediments and sediment porewaters as well as surrounding soils was conducted in three small lakes (80 wt%) of arsenic is contained in the form of secondary sulphide precipitates, with iron oxy-hydroxides hosting a minimal amount of arsenic (
PubMed ID
29223820 View in PubMed
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Bronchiolo-alveolitis with pulmonary basal lamina injury in a rheumatoid patient during gold treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14557
Source
Pathol Res Pract. 1988 Feb;183(1):46-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
P. Pääkkö
S. Sutinen
S. Anttila
H. Autio-Harmainen
R. Sormunen
M. Hakala
J. Jouppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pathol Res Pract. 1988 Feb;183(1):46-53
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alveolitis, Extrinsic Allergic - chemically induced - pathology
Arthritis - drug therapy
Basement Membrane - ultrastructure
Bronchiolitis - chemically induced - pathology
Female
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - adverse effects
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Lung - ultrastructure
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Alveoli
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A 47-year-old housewife presented with nonproductive cough, progressive breathlessness and intermittent fever during gold treatment, originally prescribed for seropositive polyarthritis, which later fulfilled the criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An open lung biopsy showed abundant interstitial edema with mononuclear inflammatory cells and some eosinophils, and slight bronchiolitis. The picture was nonspecific but suggestive of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Electron microscopy revealed splitting and local disappearance of the basal laminae of the alveolar capillaries, venules and alveolar epithelium. This injury was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining for type IV collagen and laminin, the major components of basal laminae. In most macrophages there was lysosomal electron dense granular material, i.e. aurosomes, which gave the spectrum of gold in electron microprobe analysis. After the gold treatment was stopped the pulmonary symptoms gradually decreased during several months and no permanent lung disease remained. Whereas the pulmonary manifestation could have been due to her underlying disease we discuss in this study the possibility of its being gold induced.
PubMed ID
3129704 View in PubMed
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Cancer morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with Proresid or parenteral gold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14353
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1995;24(2):79-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Bendix
A. Bjelle
E. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1995;24(2):79-84
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - drug therapy
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - therapeutic use
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral
Male
Morbidity
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Podophyllin - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Podophyllotoxin - analogs & derivatives
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The cancer risk was studied by comparison of 305 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients exposed to Proresid during a mean time of 22 months and 305 RA patients exposed to sodium aurothiomalate during a mean time of 19 months with the regional cancer register. The mean observation time was 6.9 years (2,117 person-years) for the Proresid-treated and 7.5 years (2,293 person-years) for the gold-treated patients. No increased risk of total malignancies was observed for either group. However, looking at separate tumours, an increased risk of lymphoma and leukemia was found although only significant in the gold-treated group. It was not correlated to dosage or duration of either therapy. The increased risk is consistent with earlier reports of an increased risk of hematopoietic malignancies in RA patients. Marginal over and underreporting, particularly of hematopoietic malignancies, were observed, mainly due to clinicians' failure to report and to recall false reports.
PubMed ID
7747148 View in PubMed
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Carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners: possible aetiological factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225366
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1991 Dec;48(12):808-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
R A Kusiak
J. Springer
A C Ritchie
J. Muller
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1991 Dec;48(12):808-17
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology - mortality
Arsenic - adverse effects
Canada
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - etiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Geological Phenomena
Geology
Gold
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Nickel
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radon - adverse effects
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of 54,128 men who worked in Ontario mines was observed for mortality between 1955 and 1986. Most of these men worked in nickel, gold, or uranium mines; a few worked in silver, iron, lead/zinc, or other ore mines. If mortality that occurred after a man had started to mine uranium was excluded, an excess of carcinoma of the lung was found among the 13,603 Ontario gold miners in the study (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 129, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 115-145) and in men who began to mine nickel before 1936 (SMR 141, 95% CI 105-184). The excess mortality from lung cancer in the gold miners was confined to men who began gold mining before 1946. No increase in the mortality from carcinoma of the lung was evident in men who began mining gold after the end of 1945, in men who began mining nickel after 1936, or in men who mined ores other than gold, nickel, and uranium. In the gold mines each year of employment before the end of 1945 was associated with a 6.5% increase in mortality from lung cancer 20 or more years after the miner began working the mines (95% CI 1.6-11.4%); each year of employment before the end of 1945 in mines in which the host rock contained 0.1% arsenic was associated with a 3.1% increase in lung cancer 20 years or more after exposure began (95% CI 1.1-5.1%); and each working level month of exposure to radon decay products was associated with a 1.2% increase in mortality from lung cancer five or more years after exposure began (95% CI 0.02-2.4%). A comparison of two models shows that the excess of lung cancer mortality in Ontario gold miners is associated with exposure to high dust concentrations before 1946, with exposure to arsenic before 1946, and with exposure to radon decay products. No association between the increased incidence of carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners and exposure to mineral fibre could be detected. It is concluded that the excess of carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners is probably due to exposure to arsenic and radon decay products.
Notes
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1988 Nov 2;80(17):1404-73172266
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1987;11(1):15-263028136
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1979 Aug;36(3):199-205315411
Cites: Cancer. 1977 Apr;39(4):1647-55192433
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Nov;120(5):1025-9228572
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Dec;70(12):1261-87435743
Cites: Biometrics. 1983 Sep;39(3):665-746652201
Cites: Cancer. 1981 Mar 1;47(5):1042-66261919
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1982;3(4):423-406301270
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 Dec;46(12):881-62611163
Cites: Toxicol Ind Health. 1989 Dec;5(6):975-932626765
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 Aug;46(8):529-362550048
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 May;46(5):289-912546576
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1985;7(4):285-942986455
PubMed ID
1663386 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of work schedules of miners exposed to vibration in placer and ore mines in the North-West].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227510
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A A Loginov
G N Kim
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):23-6
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Far East
Gold
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Mining - standards
Occupational Medicine - standards
Siberia
Time Factors
Vibration
Work Capacity Evaluation
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
The contributors review the peculiarities of modelling the labour regimen for the vibration-affected professions in the North-West, based on the dosage-related approach, inasmuch as the existing techniques of ore deposits elaboration (chamber-long face and magnification of ore), and the organization of pit works on cyclogrammes, did not allow a practical application of the labour regimen recommendations proposed by the USSR Ministry of Health.
PubMed ID
1817080 View in PubMed
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Clinical and radiological disease-course in a Swedish DMARD-treated early RA-inception cohort: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13758
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2004;33(6):380-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
M C Wick
S. Lindblad
R J Weiss
L. Klareskog
R F van Vollenhoven
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. marius.wick@uibk.ac.at
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2004;33(6):380-4
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - radiography
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Disease Progression
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Prognosis
Registries
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) decrease clinical signs and symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, radiographic changes sometimes continue to accrue despite effective suppression of clinical symptoms by therapy. The objective of this study was to identify whether successful clinical disease-control in a Swedish early RA-inception cohort of patients led to an attenuation of radiological progression. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analysed clinical data and radiographs of 95 patients who were on a stable treatment regimen [methotrexate (MTX), sulfasalazine (SSZ), oral gold (AUR)] or who had changed between different DMARDs during the 2-year observation period [multiple therapy failures (mTF)]. Radiographs were quantified using the modified Larsen score and 'X-Ray RheumaCoach' software. RESULTS: Clinical measures improved markedly (p
PubMed ID
15794195 View in PubMed
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89 records – page 1 of 9.