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An immunoprecipitin study of the incidence of influenza A antibodies in animal sera in the Ottawa area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252131
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1975 Jul;21(7):1089-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1975
Author
R E Fyson
J C Westwood
A H Brunner
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1975 Jul;21(7):1089-101
Date
Jul-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies - analysis
Antigens, Viral
Antiviral Agents
Birds
Canada
Cats
Cattle
Complement Fixation Tests
Convalescence
Dogs
Goats
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Horses
Humans
Immunodiffusion
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Influenza A virus - immunology
Influenza, Human - immunology
Mammals
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human - immunology
Rabbits
Sheep
Species Specificity
Abstract
A survey of over 600 'normal' sera from 14 animal species by immunoprecipitin tests in cellulose acetate using viron antigens revealed a high incidence of precipitating activity against a broad range of influenza A virus strains, particularly A2hHong Kong/1/68 and /PR8. However, serum treatments trypsin-heat-periodate, NaIO4, V. cholerae receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE), or kaolin eliminated most precipitating activity, which suggests that it was due to "non-specific" inhibitors of influenze viruses. A resistant minority could not be identified as inhibitor or antibody on this basis. Precipitation of the influenza A major type-specific antigen in virus-soluble antigens by human 7S gamma globulin antibody (IgG), demonstrated to be specific for influenza virus, was established as a reference reaction to identify similar immunoprecipitin reactions occurring between virus-soluble antigens and normal or immune sera. Complement fixation tests provided supplementary evidence for the presence of influenza A antibodies in these sera. Influenza A antibodies were found in only a few sera of six animal species: cat, dog, rabbit, goat, chipmunk, and sheep. Thus the animal species examined in the Ottawa area have not revealed an unequivocal reservoir for human influenza A viruses.
PubMed ID
167931 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of brucellosis related to the importation of sick animals]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44049
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1970 Sep;47(9):107-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1970

An outbreak of Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus associated with consumption of fresh goat cheese.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170516
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2006;6:36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Markku Kuusi
Elina Lahti
Anni Virolainen
Maija Hatakka
Risto Vuento
Leila Rantala
Jaana Vuopio-Varkila
Eija Seuna
Matti Karppelin
Marjaana Hakkinen
Johanna Takkinen
Veera Gindonis
Kyosti Siponen
Kaisa Huotari
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. markku.kuusi@ktl.fi
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2006;6:36
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Goats - microbiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus equi - isolation & purification
Abstract
Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus is a rare infection in humans associated with contact with horses or consumption of unpasteurized milk products. On October 23, 2003, the National Public Health Institute was alerted that within one week three persons had been admitted to Tampere University Central Hospital (TaYS) because of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus septicaemia. All had consumed fresh goat cheese produced in a small-scale dairy located on a farm. We conducted an investigation to determine the source and the extent of the outbreak.
Cases were identified from the National Infectious Disease Register. Cases were persons with S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolated from a normally sterile site who had illness onset 15.9-31.10.2003. All cases were telephone interviewed by using a standard questionnaire and clinical information was extracted from patient charts. Environmental and food specimens included throat swabs from two persons working in the dairy, milk from goats and raw milk tank, cheeses made of unpasteurized milk, vaginal samples of goats, and borehole well water. The isolates were characterized by ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE).
Seven persons met the case definition; six had septicaemia and one had purulent arthritis. Five were women; the median age was 70 years (range 54-93). None of the cases were immunocompromized and none died. Six cases were identified in TaYS, and one in another university hospital in southern Finland. All had eaten goat cheese produced on the implicated farm. S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus was isolated from throat swabs, fresh goat cheese, milk tank, and vaginal samples of one goat. All human and environmental strains were indistinguishable by ribotyping and PFGE.
The outbreak was caused by goat cheese produced from unpasteurized milk. Outbreaks caused by S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus may not be detected if streptococcal strains are only typed to the group level. S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus may be a re-emerging disease if unpasteurized milk is increasingly used for food production. Facilities using unpasteurized milk should be carefully monitored to prevent this type of outbreaks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16504158 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to staphylococcal DNases in sera from different animal species, including humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229976
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Nov;27(11):2444-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
S. Høie
K. Fossum
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Nov;27(11):2444-7
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Cattle
Deoxyribonucleases - immunology
Dogs
Goats
Horses
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunodiffusion
Norway - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sheep
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Staphylococcus - enzymology - immunology
Staphylococcus aureus - enzymology - immunology
Swine
Abstract
An agar diffusion method using microtiter plates was used to detect antibodies to the DNases produced by Staphylococcus aureus, S. intermedius, and S. hyicus. Antibodies to DNase from S. aureus were demonstrated in most of the sera from the species investigated, except dogs, only 11% of whose sera were positive. Positive titers to S. intermedius DNase were found in 84% of deg sera, 61% of Icelandic pony sera, 41% of pig sera, 21% of human sera, and 20% of cow sera but in only 2 and 4% of goat and sheep sera, respectively. Although antibodies to DNase from S. hyicus were not found in sera from humans, dogs, goats, or sheep, 84% of sera from pigs and cows and 29% of sera from Icelandic ponies were positive in this respect. The good accordance between the findings from bacteriological investigations performed elsewhere and the results of serologic tests performed in this study indicates that the results obtained with the serological method in this study properly reflect the actual antigenic exposure to and distribution of the three Staphylococcus spp. in animals and humans.
Notes
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Cites: Vet Microbiol. 1985 Apr;10(3):269-773159146
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1983 Nov;18(5):1098-1016643663
PubMed ID
2509511 View in PubMed
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Brucellosis in the European Union and Norway at the turn of the twenty-first century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187913
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2002 Dec 20;90(1-4):135-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2002
Author
Jacques Godfroid
Annemarie Käsbohrer
Author Affiliation
Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Center, VAR 99, Groeselenberg, 1180 Brussels, Belgium. jagod@var.fgov.be
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2002 Dec 20;90(1-4):135-45
Date
Dec-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brucella abortus
Brucella melitensis
Brucellosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Brucellosis, Bovine - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cattle
Europe - epidemiology
European Union
Geography
Goat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Goats
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Swine
Abstract
Control and eradication programs of brucellosis in cattle, sheep, goats and pigs have been more or less successfully implemented within the Member States (MS) of the European Union (EU) and Norway after Word War II. As a result, the epidemiological situation of animal brucellosis is extremely diverse among different MS or regions within a MS and among the different animal species. Some MS, mainly North European countries, and Norway are declared "officially bovine brucellosis free" and/or "officially ovine and caprine (Brucella melitensis) free". The situation is less favorable in Southern European countries, particularly as far as sheep and goat brucellosis are concerned. This situation has important zoonotic consequences as reflected in the number of human brucellosis cases due to B. melitensis that are still encountered in those countries. Brucellosis in swine has re-emerged as a result of spillover from the wild boar brucellosis (Brucella suis biovar 2) reservoir, particularly in outdoor reared pigs. Besides the actual challenge to eradicate brucellosis, further issues have to be addressed: (1) the management of false positive serological results that occur in the course of brucellosis testing, particularly in cattle; (2) the impact of wildlife brucellosis, particularly wild boar brucellosis in domestic animals; and (3) the importance of B. melitensis infection in cattle that are in contact with infected sheep.
PubMed ID
12414139 View in PubMed
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Caprine arthritis encephalitis and caseous lymphadenitis in goats: use of bulk tank milk ELISAs for herd-level surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266314
Source
Vet Rec. 2015 Feb 14;176(7):173
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2015
Author
G E Nagel-Alne
P S Valle
R. Krontveit
L S Sølverød
Source
Vet Rec. 2015 Feb 14;176(7):173
Date
Feb-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus, Caprine - isolation & purification
Corynebacterium Infections - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis - isolation & purification
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - veterinary
Female
Goat Diseases - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Goats
Lentivirus Infections - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Lymphadenitis - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Milk - microbiology - virology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Serologic Tests - veterinary
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of two ELISA tests applied to bulk tank milk (BTM) as the first part of a two-step test scheme for the surveillance of caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAE) and caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) infections in goats. The herd-level BTM tests were assessed by comparing them to the test results of individual serological samples. The potential for refining the cut-off levels for BTM tests used as surveillance tools in a population recently cleared of infection was also investigated. Data was gathered on serum (nCAE =9702 and nCLA=13426) and corresponding BTM (nCAE=78 and nCLA=123) samples from dairy goat herds enrolled in the Norwegian disease control and eradication programme 'Healthier Goats'. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the CAE ELISA BTM test with respect to detecting =2 per cent within-herd prevalence were 72.7 per cent and 86.6 per cent, respectively. For the CLA ELISA BTM the sensitivity and specificity were 41.4 per cent and 81.7 per cent, respectively, for the same goal of detection. The results suggest that BTM testing can be applied as a cost-effective first step for early detection of CAE and CLA infection.
PubMed ID
25344573 View in PubMed
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Carriage frequency, diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish small ruminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117510
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2013 Apr 12;163(1-2):110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2013
Author
Jacob Eriksson
Carmen Espinosa-Gongora
Inga Stamphøj
Anders Rhod Larsen
Luca Guardabassi
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen. Stigbøjlen 4, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2013 Apr 12;163(1-2):110-5
Date
Apr-12-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Goat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Goats
Humans
Methicillin Resistance - genetics
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - classification - genetics
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Prevalence
Ruminants - microbiology
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Staphylococcus aureus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in animals has recently gained attention by the research community due to the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). We investigated carriage frequency and clonal diversity of S. aureus in 179 sheep and 17 goats in Denmark using spa typing and MLST. S. aureus was detected in 74 sheep (41%) and 11 goats (64%). The isolates belonged to 26 spa types (including six novel spa types) and 12 STs (including three novel STs). The most common lineage was ST133, which was found in 65% sheep and 55% goats. MRSA was found in three animals and two of them harboured mecC and corresponded to the same lineage (ST130, t843) previously reported in mecC-associated human MRSA infections in Denmark. The remaining MRSA isolate belonged to ST398 but its recovery in sheep could be a consequence of cross contamination due to contact with pigs. This study provides novel data about the occurrence of S. aureus in small ruminants, revealing high carriage frequency and diversity in these animals. The finding of mecC in ovine ST130 isolates suggests that sheep may be a reservoir of this new emerging MRSA clone of suspected animal origin. Inclusion of sheep in national MRSA surveillance programmes in animals is advisable in view of this finding.
PubMed ID
23290574 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.