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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Association of CD44 isoform immunohistochemical expression with myometrial and vascular invasion in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3943
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2002 Jan;84(1):58-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Gary N Stokes
Jack B Shelton
Christopher M Zahn
Brian S Kendall
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Third Medical Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 99506, USA.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2002 Jan;84(1):58-61
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, CD44 - biosynthesis
Carcinoma, Endometrioid - blood supply - metabolism - pathology
Endometrial Neoplasms - blood supply - metabolism - pathology
Female
Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Myometrium - pathology
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neovascularization, Pathologic - metabolism
Protein Isoforms
Solubility
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Appropriate clinical management of cases of FIGO Grade I and II endometrial carcinoma relies heavily on the determination of myometrial invasion (MI). There are no reports addressing expression of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 in the subset of Grade I and II endometrioid carcinoma (EC) as it relates to prognosis, including MI. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining for CD44s and CD44v6 was evaluated in 40 hysterectomy specimens with Grade I and II EC, including 11 noninvasive ECs, 14 with MI 50%). Staining characteristics according to the presence of MI and vascular space invasion (VSI) were evaluated. Strong membranous staining of >10% of tumor cells was interpreted as positive. RESULTS: CD44v6 staining was positive in 20% (8/40) of cases, including 45% (5/11) of EC without MI but only 10% (3/29) with MI (P = 0.025). CD44v6 staining was not present in deeply invasive tumors (0/15), while it was present in 8/25 superficially or noninvasive tumors (P = 0.016). Sensitivity and specificity were 25 and 100%, respectively, using CD44v6 in evaluating deep myometrial invasion. CD44s showed a trend toward positive staining when comparing noninvasive versus invasive tumors and noninvasive/superficially invasive versus deeply invasive tumors (P = 0.08 and 0.12, respectively). CD44s or CD44v6 staining was highly specific for absence of VSI, although statistical comparison did not reach significance. CONCLUSION: Deeply invasive EC was associated with a consistent lack of CD44v6 expression. This may have potential clinical utility if this finding is demonstrated in further study of prehysterectomy sampling specimens containing EC.
PubMed ID
11748977 View in PubMed
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Brown Norway rat ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies increase the human basophil expression of CD63 marker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57432
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2003 Mar;57(3):271-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
A. Bellou
J. Saint-Laudy
L. Knippels
C. Montémont
E. Vauthier
P. Gerard
H. Pellegrom
E K Koerkamp
J F Lesesve
J L Guéant
H. Lambert
J P Mallié
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Néphrologie Expérimentale, UPRESS-JE2165, Faculté de Médecine de Nancy, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France. abdel.bellou@voila.fr
Source
Scand J Immunol. 2003 Mar;57(3):271-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaphylaxis - immunology
Animals
Antigens, CD - biosynthesis - immunology
Basophils - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Histamine Release - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis - immunology
Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Anaphylactic shock is an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent hypersensitivity. Biological tests like leucocyte histamine release (LHR) and human basophil activation (HBA), frequently used in human allergy, reflect both the amount of IgE fixed on cells and the cellular reactivity. To assess whether serum-specific IgE from Brown Norway (BN) rats prepared for ovalbumin (OVA)-induced anaphylactic shocks can activate human basophils which has a potential interest in experimental allergy: such a test could rapidly assert an IgE sensitization in laboratory animals genetically T-helper 2 (Th2)-predisposed. Rats (n = 39) were immunized three times (day 0, day 5 and day 21) with OVA injected subcutaneously. One week after the third immunization, a shock was induced with an intravenous (i.v.) bolus of OVA. Sensitization was assessed by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) test and dosages of serum IgE antibodies anti-OVA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Blood basophils were counted before and during the shock. Before the shock induction (at day 21), an LHR test was performed on rat blood, and human basophils were sensitized with rat sera. HBA was demonstrated by the increase in the percentage of cells expressing CD63 antigen membrane, measured by flow cytometry. Twenty-one days after the first subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization, the rat serum induced a significant HBA. HBA was observed neither with the same serum previously heated nor with the serum from nonimmunized rats (NIRs). OVA-specific IgEs were significantly increased in immunized rat (IR) serum. The PCA test was negative when the serum was previously heated (56 degrees C). We never observed any circulating basophils, and LHR test was negative. After OVA i.v. administration, all IRs died rapidly. HBA testing strongly suggests a mediation by specific IgE in the increase of CD63 in BN rats. Thus, HBA test seems useful in assessing whether an experimental allergy was induced in animals genetically predisposed to an immune response, Th2-mediated, like BN rat. We also conclude that rat basophil activation does not participate in the histamine release during anaphylactic shock in sensitized BN rats.
PubMed ID
12641656 View in PubMed
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Comparative analysis of virulence determinants and mass spectral profiles of Finnish and Lithuanian endodontic Enterococcus faecalis isolates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165065
Source
Oral Microbiol Immunol. 2007 Apr;22(2):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
A. Reynaud af Geijersstam
R. Culak
L. Molenaar
M. Chattaway
E. Røslie
V. Peciuliene
M. Haapasalo
H N Shah
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontics, Institute of Clinical Odontology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. annehr@odont.uio.no
Source
Oral Microbiol Immunol. 2007 Apr;22(2):87-94
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Proteins - analysis - biosynthesis
Carrier Proteins - biosynthesis
Dental Pulp Cavity - microbiology
Enterococcus faecalis - drug effects - enzymology - genetics - pathogenicity
Finland - epidemiology
Gelatinases - biosynthesis
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology
Humans
Lithuania - epidemiology
Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Membrane Proteins - biosynthesis
Molecular Epidemiology
Perforin
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins - biosynthesis
Protein Array Analysis
Proteome
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Virginiamycin - pharmacology
Virulence Factors
Abstract
Putative virulence factors of Enterococcus faecalis have been proposed by several workers and, by analogy, these have been linked to strains of endodontic origin. However, their distribution within the cell population is unknown. In the present study, isolates were taken from the dental root canals of two defined human populations, Lithuanian and Finnish, and examined for a range of virulence properties. In addition, surface-associated molecules and intracellular proteins were compared using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ProteinChip capture/MS (SELDI-TOF-MS), respectively.
Twenty-three Lithuanian and 35 Finnish dental root canal isolates were included. The esp, gelE, ace and efaA genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction, and cytolysin and gelatinase phenotypes were determined by hydrolysis of horse blood agar and gelatine agar, respectively. Protein extracts and surface-associated molecules of whole cells were analysed by SELDI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively.
Presence of esp (n = 15), cytolysin (n = 9), ace (n = 55) and efaA (n = 58) was not statistically different in the two samples, whereas gelE and gelatinase production was detected more frequently in the Finnish material (chi-squared, P
PubMed ID
17311631 View in PubMed
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Differential receptor usage of small ruminant lentiviruses in ovine and caprine cells: host range but not cytopathic phenotype is determined by receptor usage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13939
Source
Virology. 2002 Sep 15;301(1):21-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2002
Author
Isidro Hötzel
William Cheevers
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, Washington State University Pullman, Washington, 99164-7040, USA. ihe@vetmed.wsu.edu
Source
Virology. 2002 Sep 15;301(1):21-31
Date
Sep-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus, Caprine - pathogenicity - physiology
Goats
Membrane Fusion
Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Receptors, Virus - physiology
Recombinant Proteins - biosynthesis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sheep
Viral Envelope Proteins - biosynthesis
Viral Interference
Virus Replication
Visna-maedi virus - pathogenicity - physiology
Abstract
The ovine maedi-visna (MVV) and caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) exhibit differential species tropism and cytopathic effects in vitro. Icelandic MVV-K1514 is a lytic SRLV which can infect cells from many species in addition to ruminants, whereas a lytic North American MVV strain (85/34) as well as nonlytic MVV strain S93 and CAEV can infect only ruminant cells. In the present study, we determined if differential receptor usage in sheep and goat cells is the basis of differential species tropism or cytopathic phenotype of SRLV. Infection interference assays in sheep and goat synovial membrane cells using pseudotyped CAEV vectors showed that North American MVV strains 85/34 and S93 and CAEV use a common receptor (SRLV receptor A), whereas MVV-K1514 uses a different receptor (SRLV receptor B). In addition, human 293T cells expressing CAEV but not MVV-K1514 envelope glycoproteins fused with a goat cell line persistently infected with MVV-K1514, indicating that MVV-K1514 does not use SRLV receptor A for cell-to-cell fusion. Therefore, our results indicate that the differential species tropism of SRLV is determined by receptor usage. However, receptor usage is unrelated to cytopathic phenotype.
PubMed ID
12359443 View in PubMed
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Effects of herbal medicinal products and food supplements on induction of CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 in the human colon carcinoma cell line LS180.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79440
Source
Phytother Res. 2007 Mar;21(3):239-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Brandin Helena
Viitanen Eila
Myrberg Olle
Arvidsson Ann-Kristin
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Phytother Res. 2007 Mar;21(3):239-44
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cell Line, Tumor - enzymology
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 - biosynthesis - genetics
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - biosynthesis - genetics
DNA Primers
Dietary Supplements
Humans
P-Glycoprotein - biosynthesis - genetics
Phytotherapy
Plants, Medicinal
RNA - analysis
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
A selection of popular herbal medicinal products and food supplements were analysed for their potential to modulate the expression of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 and the transporter protein MDR1. A total of 31 products were analysed. Nine of the products have been approved by the Medical Products Agency (MPA) in Sweden and are marketed as herbal medicinal products. Twenty-two of the products have not been assessed by the MPA and are marketed as food supplements. LS180 cells were exposed to extracts from the different herbal products and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, RT-QPCR, was subsequently used to analyse the relative mRNA levels of CYP1A2, CYP3A4 or MDR1 in treated and non-treated cells. Our results show that 17 of 31 products tested induced a two-fold expression or more for at least one of the genes analysed. Four products, of which a ginger-supplement was the most potent, induced all three genes.
PubMed ID
17163579 View in PubMed
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The expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance proteins 1 and 2 (MRP1 and MRP2) in human malignant mesothelioma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19465
Source
Ann Oncol. 2001 Sep;12(9):1239-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
Y. Soini
K. Järvinen
R. Kaarteenaho-Wiik
V. Kinnula
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland. ylermi.soini@ppshp.fi
Source
Ann Oncol. 2001 Sep;12(9):1239-45
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Mesothelioma - drug therapy - genetics - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins - biosynthesis
P-Glycoprotein - biosynthesis
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma is a malignancy with a primary resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies for reasons which are still unclear. Multidrug resistance proteins might explain the observed resistance, but no studies have assessed their expression in mesothelioma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and the multidrug resistance proteins 1 and 2 (MRP1 and MRP2) were investigated in 36 cases of malignant mesothelioma and in samples from normal mesothelium. RESULTS: P-gp immunopositivity was found in 61%, MRP1 immunopositivity in 58% and MRP2 positivity in 33% of the cases. Normal mesothelium did not express these multidrug-resistant proteins. There was a significant association between P-gp and MRP2 (P = 0.022) expression. No or weak P-gp, MRP1 or MRP2 immunostaining was significantly more frequent in sarcomatoid mesothelimas than in epithelial or biphasic mesotheliomas (P = 0.031, P = 0.034 and P = 0.024, respectively). There was no significant association between patient survival and expression of the multidrug-resistant proteins. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that P-gp, MRP1 and MRP2 are induced and expressed in malignant mesothelial cells. Regardless of their expression no association with survival of the patients was seen, suggesting that the primary resistance of malignant mesotheliomas is not solely dependent on their expression or function.
PubMed ID
11697834 View in PubMed
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Expression of toll-like receptor 4 and endotoxin responsiveness in mice during perinatal period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63265
Source
Pediatr Res. 2005 May;57(5 Pt 1):644-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Kirsi Harju
Marja Ojaniemi
Samuli Rounioja
Virpi Glumoff
Reija Paananen
Reetta Vuolteenaho
Mikko Hallman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Res. 2005 May;57(5 Pt 1):644-8
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Blotting, Western
Cytokines - metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Endotoxins - metabolism
Inflammation
Interleukin-1 - biosynthesis
Interleukin-10 - biosynthesis
Interleukin-6 - biosynthesis
Lipopolysaccharides - metabolism
Lung Diseases - microbiology
Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Mice
Mice, Inbred DBA
Monokines - biosynthesis
Placenta - metabolism
RNA - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Receptors, Cell Surface - biosynthesis
Receptors, Interleukin-1 - biosynthesis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribonucleases - metabolism
Signal Transduction
Time Factors
Toll-Like Receptor 4
Toll-Like Receptors
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - biosynthesis
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] from Gram-negative bacteria is found in amniotic fluid in intrauterine infections that associate with the risk for spontaneous premature birth, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and respiratory distress syndrome. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is the signaling receptor for LPS. The aim was to investigate the primary inflammatory response in mice shortly after administration of LPS to the dam (14 and 17 d of pregnancy), to the newborn, or into the amniotic fluid. The expression levels of TLR4, IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and IL-1 receptor 1 were studied with ribonuclease protection assay. In addition, TLR4 protein was analyzed with Western blotting. The fetal membranes expressed TLR4 mRNA and protein and showed an acute cytokine response to LPS when LPS was administrated into the amniotic fluid. There was distinct ontogeny in the responsiveness of fetal lung to LPS: on fetal day 14 (term 20 d), both the expression of TLR4 and the acute cytokine response were undetectable 5 h after LPS; they became detectable by fetal day 17. TLR4 and the cytokine response further increased after birth. In maternal lung, the TLR4 expression was strongest and up-regulated in parallel with the induction of the cytokines. We propose that TLR4 controls the magnitude of the LPS-induced cytokine response during the perinatal period.
PubMed ID
15718365 View in PubMed
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Glomerular endothelium in kidneys with congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (NPHS1).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160069
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Apr;23(4):1224-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anne Kaukinen
Arvi-Matti Kuusniemi
Irmeli Lautenschlager
Hannu Jalanko
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, 00029 Helsinki, Finland. anne.kaukinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Apr;23(4):1224-32
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antigens, CD15
Apoptosis
Biopsy
Blotting, Western
Capillaries - metabolism - ultrastructure
Cell Proliferation
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Endothelium, Vascular - metabolism - ultrastructure
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit - biosynthesis
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Nick-End Labeling
Infant
Integrin alpha4beta1 - biosynthesis
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 - biosynthesis
Kidney Glomerulus - blood supply
Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 - biosynthesis
Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
Middle Aged
Nephrotic Syndrome - congenital - metabolism - pathology
Oligosaccharides - biosynthesis
P-Selectin
Retrospective Studies
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 - biosynthesis
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A - biosynthesis
Abstract
The role of glomerular capillary endothelium in the pathophysiology of nephrotic kidney diseases is poorly known. We analysed the glomerular endothelial lesions in kidneys from patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (NPHS1). The disorder is caused by a genetic defect in a major podocyte slit diaphragm protein, nephrin. It manifests as nephrotic syndrome soon after birth and leads to glomerular sclerosis in early childhood.
The glomerular capillary and endothelial cell lesions in NPHS1 kidneys nephrectomized at infancy were studied by electron and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and cytokine antibody array.
Mesangial expansion and capillary obliteration were evident in practically all NPHS1 glomeruli. No thrombus formation was detected by fibrin staining. Electron microscopy revealed endothelial blebs (endotheliosis). The endothelial fenestration and the attachment of endothelial cells to the basement membrane were, however, quite normal. This fits to the abundant expression of a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), in NPHS1 glomer- uli. The proliferative activity of the intracapillary cells was modest and no apoptosis was detected. The expression of an endothelial adhesion molecule, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and several chemokines was upregulated in NPHS1 glomeruli as compared to adult control kidneys. The recruitment of leukocytes carrying ligands for the major endothelial adhesion molecules, however, was modest in the mesangial area of NPHS1 glomeruli.
The findings indicate that the glomerular endothelium is quite resistant to the nephrotic state in NPHS1 kidneys and underscores the importance of mesangial cells in the progression of glomerular sclerosis.
PubMed ID
18048423 View in PubMed
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High endothelial venules of the lymph nodes express Fas ligand.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30381
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 2004 May;52(5):693-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Tuomo S Kokkonen
Merja T Augustin
Johanna M Mäkinen
Jorma Kokkonen
Tuomo J Karttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 2004 May;52(5):693-9
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Endothelium, Vascular - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Lymph Nodes - blood supply - metabolism
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Middle Aged
Venules - metabolism
Abstract
Fas (CD95, APO-1) is widely expressed on lymphatic cells, and by interacting with its natural ligand (Fas-L), Fas induces apoptosis through a complex caspase cascade. In this study we sought to survey Fas-L expression in vascular and sinusoidal structures of human reactive lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical Fas-L expression was present in all paracortical high endothelial venules (HEVs), in cells lining the marginal sinus wall, and in a few lymphocytes, but only occasionally in non-HEV vascular endothelium. In the paracortical zone over 60% of all vessels and all paracortical HEVs showed Fas-L expression, whereas in the medullary zone less than 10% of the blood vessels were stained with Fas-L. Normal vessels outside lymph nodes mostly showed no Fas-L expression. We show that in human reactive lymph nodes Fas-L expression is predominantly present in HEVs. Because the circulating lymphocytes gain entry to nodal parenchyma by transendothelial migration through HEVs, the suggested physiological importance of Fas-L expression in these vessels lies in the regulation of lymphocyte access to lymph node parenchyma by possibly inducing Fas/Fas-L mediated apoptosis of activated Fas-expressing lymphoid cells. The Fas-L expressing cells in the marginal sinus might have a similar function for cells accessing the node in afferent lymph.
PubMed ID
15100246 View in PubMed
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HPV subtypes and immunological parameters of cervical cancer in Iceland during two time periods, 1958-1960 and 1995-1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18500
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2003 Apr;89(1):22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Evgenia K Mikaelsdottir
Kristrun R Benediktsdottir
Kristrun Olafsdottir
Thorgerdur Arnadottir
Gunnar B Ragnarsson
Karl Olafsson
Kristjan Sigurdsson
Gudny S Kristjansdottir
Albert K Imsland
Helga M Ogmundsdottir
Thorunn Rafnar
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, The Icelandic Cancer Society, Skogarhlid 8, 105 Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2003 Apr;89(1):22-30
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - immunology - pathology - virology
Antigens, CD95 - biosynthesis
Apoptosis - immunology
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - immunology - pathology - virology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - immunology - pathology - virology
DNA, Viral - genetics
Female
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - biosynthesis
Humans
Iceland
Immunohistochemistry
Membrane Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - virology
Papillomavirus, Human - classification - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - biosynthesis
Tumor Virus Infections - complications - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - immunology - pathology - virology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Cervical cancer is a disease caused in part by an infection with an oncogenic subtype of human papillomavirus (HPV). In this study we analysed all cervical cancer samples diagnosed in Iceland during two periods, 1958-1960 and 1995-1996, and asked whether significant changes in viral or immunological parameters had occurred over a period that spanned both significant changes in sexual attitude and the implementation of organized screening for cervical cancer. METHODS: Samples from 47 patients (46 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC)) in the first period and 30 patients (20 SCC, 4 ASC, and 6 adenocarcinomas (AC)) in the later period were analysed for viral subtype and expression of Fas, FasL, MHC class I, p53 and apoptosis. RESULTS: AC and ASC are proportionately much more common today than 40 years ago (30% vs 2%). The distribution of HPV in cervical cancer is similar in both periods, with HPV16 found in 75% and HPV18 in 13% of cases. Other HPV types found were 31,33,45, and 59. No significant differences were found in the immunological profiles of tumors from the two periods except that a higher fraction of SCC in the later period stained positive for FasL. When SCC are compared with AC/ASC, the latter have less expression of MHC class I, less expression of Fas, and stronger FasL expression. CONCLUSIONS: AC/ASC tumors show some immunological features that suggest that they are more resistant to immune attack than SCC.
PubMed ID
12694650 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.