Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

164Ile allele in the beta2-Adrenergic receptor gene is associated with risk of elevated blood pressure in women. The Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173671
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Amar A Sethi
Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Arginine - chemistry
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Denmark
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Glutamic Acid - chemistry
Glutamine - chemistry
Glycine - chemistry
Haplotypes
Heart rate
Heterozygote
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Isoleucine - chemistry
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk
Risk factors
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Since beta2-adrenergic receptors are important regulators of blood pressure, genetic variation in this receptor could explain risk of elevated blood pressure in selected individuals. We tested the hypothesis that Gly16Arg, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene associated with elevated blood pressure.
We genotyped 9185 individuals from the adult Danish general population.
Allele frequencies of 16Arg, 27Glu, and 164Ile were 0.38, 0.44, and 0.01, respectively. Among women never treated with antihypertensive medication those heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had increased diastolic blood pressure (P=0.02). Women heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.30-2.86). Finally, women double heterozygous for Thr164Ile and Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg versus non-carriers at all 3 loci had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 2.49 (1.28-4.85) or 3.19 (1.46-6.97). In men, blood pressure was not influenced by this genetic variation.
In women Thr164Ile heterozygosity is associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, and represent a risk factor for elevated blood pressure in women in the general population. This was most pronounced in those women also heterozygous for Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg.
PubMed ID
16041242 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biosynthesis of Panaefluoroline B from the Cultured Mycobiont of Amygdalaria panaeola.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267366
Source
J Nat Prod. 2015 Jul 24;78(7):1745-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-2015
Author
Kaoru Kinoshita
Mirei Fukumaru
Yoshikazu Yamamoto
Kiyotaka Koyama
Kunio Takahashi
Source
J Nat Prod. 2015 Jul 24;78(7):1745-7
Date
Jul-24-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - chemistry
Ascomycota - chemistry
Finland
Glycine - chemistry
Isoquinolines - chemistry - isolation & purification
Lichens - microbiology
Mevalonic Acid - metabolism
Molecular Structure
Nitrogen - metabolism
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular
Abstract
Panaefluoroline B (2) is a fluorescent yellowish-green pigment produced by the cultured mycobiont of a lichen, Amygdalaria panaeola. Panaefluoroline B (2) has an isoquinoline skeleton, a C5 unit, and an amino acid, glycine, in its structure. The biosynthetic pathway of 2 was revealed by feeding experiments using [1-(13)C]-sodium acetate and [1,2-(13)C2][(15)N]-glycine. The analysis of labeling patterns of 2 and its mass spectrum suggested the isoquinoline part is biosynthesized via the acetate-malonate pathway with glycine as the nitrogen source and that the C5 unit originates from the mevalonate pathway.
PubMed ID
26135598 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of the alpha- and gamma-polymorphs of glycine on the behavior of catalepsy prone rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101898
Source
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2011 Apr;98(2):234-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arcady L Markel
Andrey F Achkasov
Tatiana A Alekhina
Olga I Prokudina
Marina A Ryazanova
Tatiana N Ukolova
Vadim M Efimov
Elena V Boldyreva
Vladimir V Boldyrev
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Department, Novosibirsk, Russia. markel@bionet.nsc.ru
Source
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2011 Apr;98(2):234-40
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects - physiology
Catalepsy - drug therapy - genetics
Crystallization
Disease Models, Animal
Glycine - chemistry - pharmacology
Male
Maze Learning - drug effects - physiology
Molecular Structure
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate - agonists
Abstract
Glycine is used to treat various health problems and is efficient in the treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Since glycine exists as a few polymorphs, the aim of this work is to compare the effects of the alpha- and gamma-forms of glycine on the behavior of the genetic catalepsy (GC) strain of rats. Both polymorphs of glycine have been administered to rats orally as pure solid chemicals, and cataleptic behavior and behaviors in the open-field, elevated plus-maze, and light-dark box tests were studied. Both the alpha- and gamma-polymorphs of glycine increased exploratory activity in the open-field test, but only the gamma-polymorph had beneficial effects on catalepsy and exploratory activity in the light-dark box and reduced anxiety in the elevated plus-maze.
PubMed ID
21236294 View in PubMed
Less detail

A randomized trial comparing monopolar electrodes using glycine 1.5% with two different types of bipolar electrodes (TCRis, Versapoint) using saline, in hysteroscopic surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93386
Source
Fertil Steril. 2009 Apr;91(4):1273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Berg Anette
Sandvik Leiv
Langebrekke Anton
Istre Olav
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Ullevaal University Hospital Oslo, Oslo, Norway. anette.berg@uus.no
Source
Fertil Steril. 2009 Apr;91(4):1273-8
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electrodes
Female
Glycine - chemistry - pharmacology
Humans
Hysteroscopes
Hysteroscopy - adverse effects - methods
Leiomyoma - complications - surgery
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Sodium Chloride - pharmacology
Treatment Outcome
Uterine Hemorrhage - etiology - surgery
Uterine Neoplasms - complications - surgery
Uterine Perforation - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare three types of equipment during hysteroscopic resection. DESIGN: A randomized study. SETTING: Women's clinic at Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. PATIENT(S): Two hundred premenopausal women with menorrhagia caused by dysfunctional bleedings, fibroids, or polyps. INTERVENTION(S): Hysteroscopic resection was performed either with monopolar electrodes using glycine 1.5% as irrigant or with two different types of bipolar electrodes (TCRis; Olympus, Hamburg, Germany and Versapoint; Gynecare, Menlo Park, CA) using saline as irrigant. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Change in serum sodium as a result of irrigant consumption, operating time, and amount of tissue removed. RESULT(S): A statistically significant reduction in mean serum sodium from 138.7 mmol/L to 133.8 mmol/L was seen in the monopolar group, compared with the case of the saline groups with no reduction. The amount of resected tissue in the monopolar and TCRis group was approximately 1.00 g/min, compared with 0.65 g/min in the Versapoint group. Loss of fluid during the procedure was significantly higher in the two bipolar groups. CONCLUSION(S): Bipolar electrodes appear to have a safer profile compared with monopolar electrodes because of the unchanged serum sodium. Irrigant consumption was significantly higher in the two bipolar groups, without any side effects during or after the procedure. Furthermore, the TCRis loop appears to be superior to the Versapoint loop, as regards operating time and amount of tissue removed.
PubMed ID
18371962 View in PubMed
Less detail