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Accuracy of HbA1c as Monitored by External Quality Assessment and Compared With Patient Mean Values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301950
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2018 07; 12(4):771-779
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
07-2018
Author
Gunnar Nordin
Author Affiliation
1 Equalis, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2018 07; 12(4):771-779
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Laboratory Proficiency Testing - methods - standards
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy and trueness of results from a laboratory test, such as the HbA1c test, should not be taken for granted but must be checked continuously. A tool for this is the participation in external quality assessment (EQA) for all laboratories performing the HbA1c-test. An additional possibility to detect changes in trueness is to monitor variations in patient cohort mean or median values that is not explained by changes in treatment or selection of patients.
Results reported to an EQA scheme for HbA1c during 20 years have been extracted from Equalis database. The results are compared to current analytical performance specifications (APS) and to the mean HbA1c levels for the Swedish population of persons with type 2 diabetes.
The accuracy of the HbA1c test has improved during the period. The hospital lab methods used in Sweden now fulfil APS agreed by professional organizations in Sweden. The accuracy for point-of-care tests (POCT) methods vary over time and fulfil APS for some periods. The bias found for some of the methods might explain changes seen in patient mean values for HbA1c in Sweden during the period 2007-2017.
The global standardization of HbA1c has resulted in an improved comparability for HbA1c-results worldwide. But even small variation in trueness for the methods in use might have important impact on mean HbA1c values for cohorts of patients. When a systematic error is observed for a specific method it is therefore essential that manufacturers correct the method without delay.
PubMed ID
29916732 View in PubMed
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Adolescent life with diabetes-Gender matters for level of distress. Experiences from the national TODS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292524
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2017 Nov; 18(7):651-659
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Gun Forsander
Mette Bøgelund
Josephine Haas
Ulf Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clin Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-416 85 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2017 Nov; 18(7):651-659
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - psychology - therapy
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemia - prevention & control
Internet
Male
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychosocial Support Systems
Quality of Life
Registries
Risk
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the relationship between diabetes distress and gender, and the association with glycemic control, social support, health behaviors, and socio-economic status.
All adolescents, aged 15 to 18 years, in the national, pediatric diabetes registry SWEDIABKIDS with type 1 diabetes were invited to complete an online questionnaire. A total of 2112 teenagers were identified.
453 complete responses were valid for analyses. Young women scored significantly higher on the distress-screening instrument DDS-2. Almost half of the female respondents exhibited moderate to severe diabetes distress-more than twice the proportion than among male respondents (44% vs 19%). Females reported twice as high scores on the fear of hypoglycemia scale (P?
PubMed ID
28004484 View in PubMed
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The association between anthropometric measures and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is different in Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants compared with the general population in Finland: a cross-sectional population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300271
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Apr 11; 19(1):391
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-11-2019
Author
Natalia Skogberg
Tiina Laatikainen
Eero Lilja
Annamari Lundqvist
Tommi Härkänen
Päivikki Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Mannerheimintie 166, PL 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. natalia.skogberg@thl.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Apr 11; 19(1):391
Date
Apr-11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Waist Circumference
Waist-Height Ratio
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Persons of African and Middle-Eastern origin living in European countries have a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, accompanied by high prevalence of obesity among women but not always among men. The aim of this study was to examine whether there are differences in the association between anthropometric measures and glucose levels measured with glycated haemoglobin and fasting blood glucose among persons of migrant origin in Finland.
Cross-sectional population-based data of the 30-64?year-old participants in the health examination of the Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study was used, selecting persons without diabetes (Russian origin n =?293, Somali origin n =?184, Kurdish origin n =?275). The reference group were non-diabetic participants in the Health 2011 Survey (n =?653), representative of the general Finnish population. Anthropometric measures included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, available for Maamu Study participants only).
Depending on whether continuous or categorical anthropometric measures were used, age, sex and anthropometrics explained 13-18% of variation in HbA1c among persons of Russian origin, 5-10% among persons of Somali origin, 1-3% among persons of Kurdish origin and 11-13% among the general population. Also depending on whether continuous or categorical anthropometric measures were used, age, sex and anthropometrics explained 13-19% of variation in fasting blood glucose among persons of Russian origin, 15-20% among persons of Somali origin, 13-17% among persons of Kurdish origin and 16-17% among the general population. With exception for BMI, strength of the association between continuous anthropometric measures and HbA1c was significantly lower among persons of Kurdish origin compared with the general Finnish population (p =?0.044 for WC and p =?0.040 for WHtR).
A low degree of association between anthropometric measures and HbA1c was observed among persons of Kurdish origin. Findings of this study suggest caution is warranted when using HbA1c as a screening tool for glucose impairment among persons without diabetes in populations of diverse origin.
PubMed ID
30971258 View in PubMed
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Association of hyperglycaemia with periodontal status: Results of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311788
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2021 01; 48(1):24-36
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2021
Author
Paula Tegelberg
Tellervo Tervonen
Matti Knuuttila
Jari Jokelainen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Juha Auvinen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2021 01; 48(1):24-36
Date
01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood glucose
Cohort Studies
Fasting
Finland - epidemiology
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prediabetic State - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association of hyperglycaemia and changes in glycaemic control with periodontal status in non-diabetic individuals.
A sub-population (n = 647) of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was studied. We categorized long-term glucose balance based on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) at ages 31 and 46: FPG
PubMed ID
33048362 View in PubMed
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Associations between adolescent experiences, parent experiences and HbA1c: results following two surveys based on the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry (NCDR).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308372
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 11 02; 9(11):e032201
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-02-2019
Author
Hilde Hestad Iversen
Oyvind Bjertnaes
Torild Skrivarhaug
Author Affiliation
Division of Health Services, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway hilde.hestad.iversen@fhi.no.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 11 02; 9(11):e032201
Date
11-02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parents
Patient satisfaction
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of the current study was to determine the association between the experiences of adolescents and their parents with paediatric diabetes care at hospital outpatient departments and the association between these experiences and the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of adolescents.
Cross-sectional survey.
Paediatric diabetes care at hospital outpatient departments in Norway.
Parents of all outpatients registered in the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry and patients in the same registry aged 12-17 years.
1399 parents participated in a national pilot survey and 335 patients aged 12-17 years from the four largest paediatric outpatient departments in Norway responded in another pilot study. 181 paired parental and patient questionnaires were analysed.
The correlations between single items, indicator scores and overall scores were explored, as was that between indicator scores and HbA1c levels.
There was a moderate but significant correlation between the responses of the patients and parents. For 40 of the 42 associations the correlations were significant, ranging from 0.16 to 0.42. A weak but significant negative correlation was found between the indicator scores of parents and the HbA1c levels of the adolescents. The strongest correlations were between HbA1c level and nurse contact and organisation, both with a correlation coefficient of 0.21 (p
PubMed ID
31678954 View in PubMed
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Better HbA1c during the first years after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes is associated with residual C peptide 10 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306777
Source
BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care. 2020 02; 8(1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2020
Author
Annika Grönberg
Daniel Espes
Per-Ola Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala Universitet Institutionen for kvinnors och barns halsa, Uppsala, Sweden annika.gronberg@kbh.uu.se.
Source
BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care. 2020 02; 8(1):
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify the factors associated with residual C peptide production at least 10 years after diagnosis in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
73 children and adolescents (
PubMed ID
32107263 View in PubMed
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Blood glucose, glucose balance, and disease-specific survival after prostate cancer diagnosis in the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310699
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2019 09; 22(3):453-460
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
09-2019
Author
Teemu J Murtola
Samueli M Sälli
Kirsi Talala
Kimmo Taari
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland. teemu.murtola@uta.fi.
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2019 09; 22(3):453-460
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis - drug effects - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy
Disease Progression
Fasting - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - complications
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Prospective Studies
Prostate - pathology
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus has been linked with adverse prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes. However, role of hyperglycemia in PCa progression is unclear. We evaluated the link between hyperglycemia and PCa survival among Finnish PCa patients.
The study cohort included 1770 men with data on fasting glucose and diagnosed with PCa within the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for PCa in 1995-2009. Additionally, 1398 men had data on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Information on fasting glucose and HbA1c measurements was obtained from the regional laboratory database. Antidiabetic medication use was obtained from the prescription database of the Social Insurance Institution (SII). Time-dependent Cox regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals for PCa death among diabetic, impaired glucose tolerant, and normoglycemic men.
During median follow-up of 9.9 years after the diagnosis, 182 men died from PCa. After adjustment for tumor stage, Gleason grade, and PSA level at diagnosis, diabetic fasting glucose level after PCa diagnosis was associated with elevated risk of PCa death compared to normoglycemic men (HR 1.67 95% CI 1.18-2.36). The risk association was strongest among participants with localized cancer at diagnosis; HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.45-3.93. The risk elevation was observed for glucose measurements taken up to 5 years earlier. Diabetic glucose levels measured before the diagnosis were not associated with PCa death.
Our study cohort suggests an increased risk of PCa death in men with diabetic fasting blood glucose levels, supporting the role of hyperglycemia as a risk factor for PCa progression.
PubMed ID
30679762 View in PubMed
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Cathepsin D improves the prediction of undetected diabetes in patients with myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310025
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2019 Aug; 124(3):187-192
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Matthijs A Velders
Fredrik Calais
Nina Dahle
Tove Fall
Emil Hagström
Jerzy Leppert
Christoph Nowak
Åke Tenerz
Johan Ärnlöv
Pär Hedberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Västmanland County Hospital , Västerås , Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2019 Aug; 124(3):187-192
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cathepsin D - blood
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Hospitalization
Hospitals, County
Humans
Incidence
Incidental Findings
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - diagnosis - therapy
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
Background: Newer therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes mellitus can improve cardiovascular outcomes, but diabetes remains underdiagnosed in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). We sought to identify proteomic markers of undetected dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus) to improve the identification of patients at highest risk for diabetes. Materials and methods: In this prospective cohort, 626 patients without known diabetes underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) during admission for MI. Proximity extension assay was used to measure 81 biomarkers. Multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for risk factors, was used to evaluate the association of biomarkers with dysglycaemia. Subsequently, lasso regression was performed in a 2/3 training set to identify proteomic biomarkers with prognostic value for dysglycaemia, when added to risk factors, fasting plasma glucose, and glycated haemoglobin A1c. Determination of discriminatory ability was performed in a 1/3 test set. Results: In total, 401/626 patients (64.1%) met the criteria for dysglycaemia. Using multivariable logistic regression, cathepsin D had the strongest association with dysglycaemia. Lasso regression selected seven markers, including cathepsin D, that improved prediction of dysglycaemia (area under the receiver operator curve [AUC] 0.848 increased to 0.863). In patients with normal fasting plasma glucose, only cathepsin D was selected (AUC 0.699 increased to 0.704). Conclusions: Newly detected dysglycaemia, including manifest diabetes, is common in patients with acute MI. Cathepsin D improved the prediction of dysglycaemia, which may be helpful in the a priori risk determination of diabetes as a motivation for confirmatory OGTT.
PubMed ID
31429631 View in PubMed
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Dietary habits, metabolic health and vitamin D status in Greenlandic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308798
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2020 04; 23(5):904-913
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2020
Author
Julie Courraud
Jonas Salling Quist
Eva Kontopodi
Martin Blomberg Jensen
Poul Jannik Bjerrum
Jørn Wulff Helge
Kaspar Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2020 04; 23(5):904-913
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Blood Glucose - analysis
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Cholesterol - blood
Diet - methods
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Greenland
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Nutritional Status
Seafood
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
To compare the dietary habits of children living in northern villages and in the capital of Greenland, given the reported transition from traditional to westernised diet in adults over recent decades, and to explore the association between consumption of marine mammals and fish (MMF) and the children's metabolic profile and vitamin D status.
Children answered an FFQ encompassing sixty-four individual food types pooled into six food categories. Their pubertal stage, body fat, fitness level, metabolic profile (non-HDL-cholesterol, glycated Hb, insulin, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) as well as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration were evaluated.
Siorapaluk and Qaanaaq (north of Greenland) and Nuuk (west).
Children aged 6-18 years (n 177).
MMF were most frequently eaten by children from Siorapaluk (mean (sd): 73·4 (14·1) times/month), followed by children from Qaanaaq (37·0 (25·0) times/month), and least often eaten by children from Nuuk (23·7 (24·6) times/month; P
PubMed ID
31573464 View in PubMed
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Eating patterns in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Associations with metabolic control, insulin omission, and eating disorder pathology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290425
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:226-231
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Line Wisting
Deborah Lynn Reas
Lasse Bang
Torild Skrivarhaug
Knut Dahl-Jørgensen
Øyvind Rø
Author Affiliation
Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo Diabetes Research Centre, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: line.wisting@ous-hf.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:226-231
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Combined Modality Therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - psychology - therapy
Diet, Diabetic
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Feeding and Eating Disorders - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Patient compliance
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Registries
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate eating patterns among male and female adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and the associations with age, zBMI, eating disorder (ED) pathology, intentional insulin omission, and metabolic control.
The sample consisted of 104 adolescents (58.6% females) with child-onset T1D, mean age of 15.7 years (SD 1.8) and mean zBMI of 0.4 (SD 0.8). The Child Eating Disorder Examination (ChEDE) assessed meal/snack frequency and ED pathology. T1D clinical data was obtained from the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry.
A significantly lower proportion of females than males (73.8% vs 97.7%) consumed breakfast on a daily basis. Approximately 50% of both genders ate lunch and 90% ate dinner daily. Among females, skipping breakfast was significantly associated with higher global ED psychopathology, shape concerns, self-induced vomiting, binge eating, insulin omission due to shape/weight concerns, and poorer metabolic control. Less frequent lunch consumption was significantly associated with poorer metabolic control. Skipping dinner was significantly associated with older age, higher dietary restraint, eating concerns, self-induced vomiting, and insulin omission. Among males, less frequent consumption of lunch and evening snacks was associated with attitudinal features of ED, including shape/weight concerns and dietary restraint.
Among adolescents with T1D, irregular or infrequent meal consumption appears to signal potential ED pathology, as well as being associated with poorer metabolic control. These findings suggest the importance of routinely assessing eating patterns in adolescents with T1D to improve detection of ED pathology and to facilitate improved metabolic control and the associated risk of somatic complications.
PubMed ID
28351671 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.