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ABCB1 and GST polymorphisms associated with TP53 status in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78779
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Feb;17(2):127-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Nordgard Silje H
Ritchie Marylyn D
Jensrud Sigrid D
Motsinger Alison A
Alnaes Grethe I G
Lemmon Gordon
Berg Marianne
Geisler Stephanie
Moore Jason H
Lønning Per Eystein
Børresen-Dale Anne-Lise
Kristensen Vessela N
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Feb;17(2):127-36
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - enzymology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Doxorubicin - therapeutic use
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione S-Transferase pi - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Norway
Organic Anion Transporters - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Recombination, Genetic
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Many environmental and genetic factors influence the development of chemoresistance. The goal of this study was to characterize the genetic variation in the ABCB1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes, as well as the haplotype structure in the ABCB1 gene. METHODS: Variants in these genes were studied in 109 healthy controls and 93 breast cancer cases, both of Caucasian origin. The cases were analyzed in relation to TP53 mutation status and response to doxorubicin. Both single and multiple single nucleotide polymorphism analyses were performed. RESULTS: Chi-square analyses revealed a significant association between TP53 mutation status and both the GA genotype of ABCB1 exon 11 (Ser400Asn) and the GG genotype of GSTP1 (Ile105Val; P
PubMed ID
17301692 View in PubMed
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[Age features of cytogenetic effects of spring-summer encephalitis among residents of northern western Siberia in connection with polymorphism for genes of glutathione-S-transferase].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290013
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2016; 29(5):756-759
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
N N Ilyinskikh
E N Ilyinskikh
Author Affiliation
Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Russian Federation; nauka-tomsk@yandex.ru.
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2016; 29(5):756-759
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - metabolism
Chromosome Aberrations
Cytogenetic Analysis - methods
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Glutathione Transferase - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Male
Mouth Mucosa - pathology
Oxidative Stress - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this work was a comparative study of the effects of spring diseases cytogenetic years of tick-borne encephalitis in elderly and young age due to differences in genes of glutathione-S-transferase. Surveyed by routine cytogenetics 120 patients with tick-borne encephalitis residents North of Tomsk region. We have taken in the study persons aged 20-35 years (Group 1) and 65-85 years old (Group 2). Material for study (buccal epithelium) was taken from each subject 3-5 times: 1st-2nd day after hospitalization, in 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months. Tick-borne encephalitis infection causes a significantly large changes in cytogenetic regimens using buccal epithelium in the elderly than in younger patients. Restoring cytogenetic norms observed in a group of young in 3 months after hospitalization, in the elderly - in 6 months. When comparing cytogenetic effects of encephalitis shows: the young patients tick-borne encephalitis level by routine cytogenetics abnormal cells was significantly higher in carriers of inactive forms of gene GSTM1 (0)/GSTT1 (0) than containing active homozygous variants of these genes. Such patterns have not been noted in a group of elderly patients.
????? ????????? ?????? ??????? ????????????? ???????? ???????????????? ??????????? ???????-??????? ????????? ?????????? ? ??? ???????? ? ???????? ???????? ? ????? ? ?????????? ?? ????? ?????????-S-???????????. ???????????????? ???????????? ???? ????????? ? 120 ??????? ???????? ??????????? ??????? ?????? ??????? ??????? - 20-35 ??? (1-? ??????) ? 65-85 ??? (2-? ??????). ???????? ??? ???????????? (?????????? ????????) ??? ???? ? ??????? ???????????? 3-5 ???: 1-2-? ???? ????? ??????????????, ????? 1 ???, 1, 3 ? 6 ???. ???????????, ??? ???????? ????????? ???????? ??????? ??????? ???????????????? ????????? ? ?????????? ???????? ? ???????, ??? ? ??????? ???????. ?????????????? ???????????????? ????? ????????? ? ?????? ??????? ????? 3 ??? ????? ??????????????, ? ? ??????? - ????? 6 ???. ??? ????????? ???????????????? ??????????? ????????? ?????????? ????????: ? ??????? ??????? ??????? ??????????????? ?????????? ?????? ??? ??????????? ???? ? ????????? ?????????? ????? ????? GSTM1(0)/GSTT1(0) ?? ????????? ? ????????, ? ??????? ???? ???????? ???????????? ???????? ???? ?????. ? ??????? ????????? ????? ?????????????? ?? ????????.
PubMed ID
28556645 View in PubMed
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Aging and susceptibility to toluene in rats: a pharmacokinetic, biomarker, and physiological approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98359
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2010;73(4):301-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Christopher J Gordon
Reddy R Gottipolu
Elaina M Kenyon
Ronald Thomas
Mette C Schladweiler
Cina M Mack
Jonathan H Shannahan
J Grace Wallenborn
Abraham Nyska
Robert C MacPhail
Judy E Richards
Mike Devito
Urmila P Kodavanti
Author Affiliation
National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. Gordon.christopher@epa.gov
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2010;73(4):301-18
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Biological Markers
Brain - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Gene Expression Regulation - drug effects
Glutathione Peroxidase - genetics - metabolism
Glutathione Transferase - genetics - metabolism
Heart - drug effects
Male
Myocardium - metabolism
Rats
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
Toluene - blood - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Abstract
Aging adults are a growing segment of the U.S. population and are likely to exhibit increased susceptibility to many environmental toxicants. However, there is little information on the susceptibility of the aged to toxicants. The toxicity of toluene has been well characterized in young adult rodents but there is little information in the aged. Three approaches were used: (1) pharmacokinetic (PK), (2) cardiac biomarkers, and (3) whole-animal physiology to assess whether aging increases susceptibility to toluene in the Brown Norway (BN) rat. Three life stages, young adult, middle aged, and aged (4, 12, and 24 mo, respectively), were administered toluene orally at doses of 0, 0.3, 0.65, or 1 g/kg and subjected to the following: terminated at 45 min or 4 h post dosing, and blood and brain toluene concentration were measured; terminated at 4 h post dosing, and biomarkers of cardiac function were measured; or monitor heart rate (HR), core temperature (Tc), and motor activity (MA) by radiotelemetry before and after dosing. Brain toluene concentration was significantly elevated in aged rats at 4 h after dosing with either 0.3 or 1 g/kg. Blood toluene concentrations were unaffected by age. There were various interactions between aging and toluene-induced effects on cardiac biomarkers. Most notably, toluene exposure led to reductions in mRNA markers for oxidative stress in aged but not younger animals. Toluene also produced a reduction in cardiac endothelin-1 in aged rats. Higher doses of toluene led to tachycardia, hypothermia, and a transient elevation in MA. Aged rats were less sensitive to the tachycardic effects of toluene but showed a prolonged hypothermic response. Elevated brain levels of toluene in aged rats may be attributed to their suppressed cardiovascular and respiratory responses. The expression of several cardiac biochemical markers of toluene exposure in the aged may also reflect differential susceptibility to this toxicant.
PubMed ID
20077299 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of genetic predisposition to pulmonary tuberculosis in native Russians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144799
Source
Genetika. 2010 Feb;46(2):262-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
O A Gra
Zh M Kozhekbaeva
V I Litvinov
Source
Genetika. 2010 Feb;46(2):262-71
Date
Feb-2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Cation Transport Proteins - genetics
Cohort Studies
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology - ethnology
P-Glycoprotein - genetics
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important concerns of public health. There is evidence suggesting that genetic status is responsible for predisposition to infectious diseases including TB. To determine genetic risk factors of TB development, the frequencies of polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C 19, GSTT1, GSTM1, NAT2, MDR1, and NRAMP1 in 73 TB patients and 352 healthy individuals were determined by allele-specific hybridization using microarray technology. The TB patients have shown a significant increase in the frequency of the null GSTT1 genotype (OR = 3.26, 95% CI = 1.91 - 5.55, p = = 0.000028) as well as the double null GSTT1/GSTM1 genotype (OR = 4.05, 95% CI = 2.14 -7.65, p = = 0.000034) compared to the group of healthy donors. It was shown that the NAT2*5/*5 genotype in combination with the "null" GSTT1 and the double "null" GSTT1/GSTM1 genotypes was observed significantly more often in the TB patients than in the control sample. Thus the examined GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2 gene polymorphisms may potentially alter the risk of TB development in ethnic Russians and are of interest for further research using larger cohorts of patients.
PubMed ID
20297661 View in PubMed
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An antibody to recombinant crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone of Nephrops norvegicus cross-reacts with neuroendocrine organs of several taxa of malacostracan Crustacea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50785
Source
Cell Tissue Res. 2002 Feb;307(2):243-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
P G Giulianini
N. Pandolfelli
S. Lorenzon
E A Ferrero
P. Edomi
Author Affiliation
BRAIN Centre for Neuroscience, Department of Biology, University of Trieste, via Licio Giorgieri 7, 34127 Trieste, Italy. giuliani@univ.trieste.it
Source
Cell Tissue Res. 2002 Feb;307(2):243-54
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies - metabolism
Antibody Specificity
Astacoidea - metabolism
Biological Assay
Comparative Study
Cross Reactions
Crustacea - metabolism
Decapoda (Crustacea) - metabolism
Endocrine Glands - physiology
Eye - chemistry - ultrastructure
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Invertebrate Hormones - immunology
Nephropidae - metabolism
Nerve Tissue Proteins - immunology
Neurons - ultrastructure
Rabbits - immunology
Recombinant Proteins - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Species Specificity
Abstract
The crustacean hyperglycaemic hormones (cHHs) are multifunctional neuropeptides that play a central role in the physiology of crustaceans. A partial cDNA coding for cHH of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, was cloned; this cDNA was fused to glutathione- S-transferase (GST) to obtain a recombinant fusion protein that was used to raise a rabbit antiserum and to perform a biological assay. The specificity of the purified antibody was demonstrated by means of Western blotting. To validate the specificity of the purified antibody to the cHH of N. norvegicus and its cross-reactivity with other species, we performed standard immunocytochemistry of the eyestalk on: (1) paraffin sections of the decapod species N. norvegicus, Munida rugosa and Astacus leptodactylus and of the stomatopod Squilla mantis; (2) semithin resin sections of N. norvegicus and Palaemon elegans; (3) ultrathin sections of N. norvegicus sinus gland (transmission electron microscopy studies). The pattern of immunoreactivity shown by N. norvegicus eyestalk sections conforms to distribution, relative amount and ultrastructural features of cHH-containing neurons and nerve endings as reported in the previous literature. In all the crustacean species examined, the antibody marks precisely the X organ-sinus gland complex and unspecific staining is completely lacking. In addition, its specific cross-reaction by immunoprecipitation depletes shrimp eyestalk extract of hyperglycaemic activity in an in vivo bioassay. The results obtained show a cHH-specific molecular recognition despite the fact that the species tested belong to systematic groups increasingly remote in the phylogenetic tree. The antibody could be used for advancing our knowledge on cHH activity in a variety of crustacean species, e.g. for monitoring reproductive and stress conditions.
PubMed ID
11845331 View in PubMed
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An international case-control study of glutathione transferase and functionally related polymorphisms and risk of primary adult brain tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78366
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Mar;16(3):559-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Schwartzbaum Judith A
Ahlbom Anders
Lönn Stefan
Warholm Margareta
Rannug Agneta
Auvinen Anssi
Christensen Helle Collatz
Henriksson Roger
Johansen Christoffer
Lindholm Carita
Malmer Beatrice
Salminen Tiina
Schoemaker Minouk J
Swerdlow Anthony J
Feychting Maria
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Biometrics, School of Public Health, Ohio State University, Starling-Loving Hall, 320 W. Tenth Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. schwartzbaum.1@osu.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Mar;16(3):559-65
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
England - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone) - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Glutathione transferases (GST) detoxify environmental and endogenous compounds and levels of two polymorphic GST proteins, GSTM3 and GSTP1, are high in the brain. Previous studies of GSTM3 and GSTP1 polymorphisms and adult brain tumor risk have produced inconsistent results, whereas the GSTM3 -63 variant is newly identified and, therefore, has not yet been studied in this context. We therefore examined associations between GSTM3 -63, GSTM3 *A/*B, GSTP1 105, and GSTP1 114 variants and adult brain tumor risk and the interaction of the effects of these same polymorphisms with cigarette smoking. In addition, the enzymes NQO1 and CYP1A1 alter susceptibility to oxidative brain damage. Because there is less previous evidence for a role of NQO1, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 variants, we restricted analysis of these variants to a small preliminary study. METHODS: We genotyped DNA collected for an international population-based case-control study of 725 glioma cases, 329 of which were glioblastoma cases, 546 meningioma cases and 1,612 controls. Study participants were residents of Sweden, southeast England, Denmark, and Finland. RESULTS: We found no associations between the GSTM3, GSTP1, NQO1, CYP1A1, GSTM1, or GSTT1 polymorphisms and adult brain tumor risk with the possible exception of a weak association between the G-C (Val-Ala) GSTP1 105/114 haplotype and glioma [odds ratio (OR), 0.73; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.54, 0.99], nor was there an interaction between the effects of the GSTM3 or GSTP1 polymorphisms and cigarette smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we observed no strong evidence for an association between GST or related enzyme polymorphisms and adult brain tumor risk.
PubMed ID
17372252 View in PubMed
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Antibodies against 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine are associated with lifestyle factors and GSTM1 genotype: a report from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9723
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 May;12(5):444-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Peter Wallström
Krystyna Frenkel
Elisabet Wirfält
Bo Gullberg
Jerzy Karkoszka
Janeric Seidegård
Lars Janzon
Göran Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. peter.wallstrom@medforsk.mas.lu.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 May;12(5):444-51
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Body Composition
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology - genetics - immunology
Obesity
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Thymidine - analogs & derivatives
Abstract
Plasma autoantibodies (aAbs) against the oxidized DNA base derivative 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-HMdU) are potential biomarkers of cancer risk and oxidative stress. We examined their association with a number of cancer risk factors: smoking, alcohol habits, body fatness, and absence of the glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 (GSTM1 and GSTT1) in a sample from the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (Sweden). This was a cross-sectional study of 264 men and 280 women, 46-67 years of age. Anti-5-HMdU aAb concentration was determined by an ELISA. Data on tobacco exposure were collected through a questionnaire. Alcohol consumption was estimated by a modified diet history method. Body fatness was assessed by a bioimpedance method. The absence or presence of genes coding for GSTM1 and GSTT1 was determined in granulocyte DNA by a multiplex PCR technique. aAb titers were significantly greater in those with high alcohol consumption. Current smokers lacking GSTM1, particularly men, had greater aAb titers compared with nonsmokers or persons expressing GSTM1. Body fatness was inversely associated with antibody titers in men. GSTT1 genotype was not associated with aAb titers. Overall, women had higher aAb titers than men. Adjustment for potential confounders (history of chronic diseases, anti-inflammatory medication, and season of blood sampling) did not change the results. Our study shows that a high alcohol consumption, smoking in combination with lack of GSTM1, and low body fatness (in men) is associated with high titers of anti-5-HMdU aAbs in this population.
PubMed ID
12750240 View in PubMed
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Association between frequency of chromosomal aberrations and cancer risk is not influenced by genetic polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89737
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Feb;117(2):203-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Rossi Anna Maria
Hansteen Inger-Lise
Skjelbred Camilla Furu
Ballardin Michela
Maggini Valentina
Murgia Elena
Tomei Antonio
Viarengo Paolo
Knudsen Lisbeth E
Barale Roberto
Norppa Hannu
Bonassi Stefano
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Pisa University, Pisa, Italy.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Feb;117(2):203-8
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chromosome Aberrations
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Risk
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals has been associated with cancer risk. It is presently unclear whether this association is influenced by individual susceptibility factors such as genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 (GSTM1) and theta 1 (GSTT1) as effect modifiers of the association between CA and cancer risk. METHODS: A case-control study was performed pooling data from cytogenetic studies carried out in 1974-1995 in three laboratories in Italy, Norway, and Denmark. A total of 107 cancer cases were retrieved from national registries and matched to 291 controls. The subjects were classified as low, medium, and high by tertile of CA frequency. The data were analyzed by setting up a Bayesian model that included prior information about cancer risk by CA frequency. RESULTS: The association between CA frequency and cancer risk was confirmed [OR(medium) (odds ratio)(medium) = 1.5, 95% credibility interval (CrI), 0.9-2.5; OR(high) = 2.8, 95% CrI, 1.6-4.6], whereas no effect of the genetic polymorphism was observed. A much stronger association was seen in the Italian subset (OR(high)= 9.4, 95% CrI, 2.6-28.0), which was characterized by a lower technical variability of the cytogenetic analysis. CA level was particularly associated with cancer of the respiratory tract (OR(high)= 6.2, 95% CrI, 1.5-20.0), the genitourinary tract (OR(high) = 4.0, 95% CrI, 1.4-10.0), and the digestive tract (OR(high) = 2.8, 95% CrI, 1.2-5.8). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the small size of the study groups, our results substantiate the cancer risk predictivity of CA frequency, ruling against a strong modifying effect of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms.
Notes
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Jul;117(7):A286-7; author reply A287-819654892
PubMed ID
19270789 View in PubMed
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Association GSTT1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 (Ile105Val) genetic polymorphisms in mothers with risk of congenital malformations in their children in Western Siberia: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258361
Source
Prenat Diagn. 2013 Nov;33(11):1095-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Lyudmila A Gordeeva
Elena N Voronina
Ekaterina A Sokolova
Natalia A Ermolenko
Julia V Gareeva
Irina M Sutulina
Tatiana A Simonova
Maxim L Filipenko
Andrej N Glushkov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Human Ecology SB RAS, Kemerovo, Russia.
Source
Prenat Diagn. 2013 Nov;33(11):1095-101
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amino Acid Substitution
Case-Control Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Glutathione S-Transferase pi - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Isoleucine - genetics
Mothers
Polymorphism, Genetic
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Valine - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in mothers may be involved in teratogenesis in their offspring. This study aims to investigate the association of GST genes (T1, M1 and P1) with the risk of having children with congenital malformations (CMs) in residents of the West Siberian region of Russia.
We studied 235 women with offspring's with CMs, and 273 women with one or more healthy children. Null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were identified through multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, and GSTP1 gene (Ile105Val) polymorphism was determined through TaqMan-real-time polymerase chain reaction.
The study showed that the maternal genotype GSTT1 «0/0» is associated with CMs in the offspring (odd ratio (OR)?=?3.63, P?=?5.18?×?10(-9) ). A significant association of the maternal genotype GSTT1 «0/0» with CMs of the cardiovascular system (OR?=?5.03, P?=?2.93?×?10(-7) ), urinary system (OR?=?4.20, P?=?3.51?×?10(-6) ) and central nervous system (OR?=?4.40, P?=?6.69?×?10(-5) ) was found in the child. No association of maternal GSTM1 (del) and GSTP1 (Ile105Val) genetic polymorphisms with CMs of the child was identified.
Homozygous deletion of the GSTT1 gene in women of the West Siberian region is a risk factor for birth defects in the child.
PubMed ID
23873097 View in PubMed
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[Association of polymorphisms in glutathione-S-transferase and DNA repair genes with ovarian cancer risk in the Russian population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120602
Source
Genetika. 2012 Jul;48(7):901-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
D V Khokhrin
A V Khrunin
A A Moiseev
V A Gorbunov
S A Limborskaia
Source
Genetika. 2012 Jul;48(7):901-4
Date
Jul-2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Repair Enzymes - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Russia
Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D Protein - genetics
Abstract
Polymorphism ofglutathione-S-transferase (GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTM3, GSTP1, and GSTT1) and DNA repair (ERCC1, ERCC2, and XRCC1) genes in samples of ovarian cancer patients and healthy women of the Russian ethnic group was studied. A trend in the allele frequency variation of ERCC2 gene single nucleotide polymorphism (rs13181, A > C) was revealed. The A allele frequency was higher in the sample of patients (60,6% versus 52,9%, P = 0.058).
PubMed ID
22988779 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.