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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute ST- elevation myocardial infarction-a cohort study on 224 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90209
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Knudsen Eva C
Seljeflot Ingebjørg
Abdelnoor Michael
Eritsland Jan
Mangschau Arild
Arnesen Harald
Andersen Geir O
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Heart Research, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. evacecilie.knudsen@ulleval.no
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and unknown type 2-diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease and no previous diagnosis of diabetes have been reported. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) 3 months after an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known glucometabolic disturbance, to evaluate the reliability of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed very early after an acute STEMI to predict the presence of AGR at 3 months, and to study other potential predictors measured in-hospital for AGR at 3 months. METHODS: This was an observational cohort study prospectively enrolling 224 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. An OGTT was performed very early after an acute STEMI and was repeated in 200 patients after 3 months. We summarised the exact agreement observed, and assessed the observed reproducibility of the OGTTs performed in-hospital and at follow up. The patients were classified into glucometabolic categories defined according to the World Health Organisation criteria. AGR was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of AGR at three months was 24.9% (95% CI 19.1, 31.4%), reduced from 46.9% (95% CI 40.2, 53.6) when measured in-hospital. Only, 108 of 201 (54%) patients remained in the same glucometabolic category after a repeated OGTT. High levels of HbA1c and admission plasma glucose in-hospital significantly predicted AGR at 3 months (p
PubMed ID
19183453 View in PubMed
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Abnormal screening glucose challenge test in pregnancy and future risk of diabetes in young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149375
Source
Diabet Med. 2009 May;26(5):474-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
R. Retnakaran
B R Shah
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Diabet Med. 2009 May;26(5):474-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - blood - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prediabetic State - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Pregnant women commonly undergo screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) using a 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT), followed by a diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in those women in whom the GCT is abnormal. Although it has long been recognized that GDM is associated with subsequent Type 2 diabetes, it has recently emerged that any degree of abnormal antepartum glucose homeostasis predicts an increased risk of postpartum glucose intolerance. Thus, in this context, we sought to determine whether women who have a pregnancy complicated by an abnormal GCT, but who do not have GDM, are at increased risk of subsequent diabetes, compared with their peers with an abnormal GCT.
A population-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted. Women referred for an antepartum OGTT indicative of an abnormal GCT (n = 15 381), but without GDM, were matched (for age, region, socioeconomic status, and year of delivery) with up to four other women without such referral (n = 61 237). The two cohorts were followed over a median 6.4 years for the development of diabetes.
The rate of incident diabetes was 5.04 cases per 1000 person-years in the cohort of women who underwent an antepartum OGTT, compared with 1.74 cases per 1000 person-years in women without an OGTT. The hazard ratio for subsequent diabetes in women with an antepartum OGTT was 2.56 (95% confidence interval 2.28, 2.87) (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabet Med. 2010 Jun;27(6):72820546300
PubMed ID
19646185 View in PubMed
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[Acceptance of new criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and associated conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244047
Source
Union Med Can. 1981 Nov;110(11):971-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981

Accumulated exposure to unemployment is related to impaired glucose metabolism in middle-aged men: A follow-up of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291192
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Nina Rautio
Tuulia Varanka-Ruuska
Eeva Vaaramo
Saranya Palaniswamy
Rozenn Nedelec
Jouko Miettunen
Jaro Karppinen
Juha Auvinen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Sylvain Sebert
Leena Ala-Mursula
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Unit of Primary Health Care, Oulu University Hospital, OYS, P.O. Box 20, 90029 Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: nina.rautio@oulu.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prediabetic State - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
We explored whether registered unemployment is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in general population.
Based on Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 at 46 years, we analyzed the oral glucose tolerance tests of 1970 men and 2544 women in relation to their preceding three-year employment records in three categories of unemployment exposure: no (employed), low (=1-year) and high exposure (>1-year).
Among men, pre-diabetes was found in 19.2% of those with no unemployment, 23.0% with low and 27.0% with high exposure, the corresponding figures for screen-detected type 2 diabetes were 3.8%, 3.8% and 9.2% (p
Notes
CommentIn: Prim Care Diabetes. 2018 Feb;12 (1):92 PMID 28807657
PubMed ID
28456438 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin in a native Canadian population experiencing rapid epidemiological transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182697
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec;26(12):3219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Anthony J G Hanley
Philip W Connelly
Stewart B Harris
Bernard Zinman
Author Affiliation
Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hanley@mshri.on.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec;26(12):3219-25
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Canada
Fasting
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Indians, North American
Insulin - blood
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Male
Metabolic Diseases - blood
Obesity - blood
Proteins - metabolism
Abstract
Adiponectin is emerging as an important protein in the etiology of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The objectives of this study were to determine cross-sectional and prospective associations of adiponectin concentration with adiposity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a population-based study of Native Canadians, a group experiencing dramatic increases in diabetes and CVD.
During the 1993-1995 baseline survey, samples for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and lipids were collected after an overnight fast. Waist circumference and percent body fat were measured, and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was administered: n = 505 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 74 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 149 with diabetes. In 1998, 95 high-risk subjects, defined as those who, at baseline, had either IGT or NGT with an elevated 2-h glucose concentration (>/==" BORDER="0">7.0 mmol/l), participated in a follow-up examination using the protocol used at baseline.
After adjustment for covariates including percent body fat and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin concentrations were significantly lower among men versus women (10.8 vs. 15.0 micro g/ml, P
PubMed ID
14633805 View in PubMed
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Adolescent manifestations of metabolic syndrome among children born to women with gestational diabetes in a general-population birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89346
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 May 15;169(10):1209-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Vääräsmäki Marja
Pouta Anneli
Elliot Paul
Tapanainen Päivi
Sovio Ulla
Ruokonen Aimo
Hartikainen Anna-Liisa
McCarthy Mark
Järvelin Marjo-Riitta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences/Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 May 15;169(10):1209-15
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes, Gestational - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - etiology
Multivariate Analysis
Phenotype
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The association between maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) and manifestations of metabolic syndrome among Caucasian adolescents was studied with data from the population-based Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort. This is a longitudinal cohort study from early pregnancy until offspring age 16 years and includes data from a risk group-based GDM screen of pregnant mothers by an oral glucose tolerance test. Metabolic outcomes were compared between the offspring of women with GDM (OGDM; n = 95) and reference group offspring (n = 3,909). The prevalence of overweight was significantly higher in the OGDM group (18.8 vs. 8.4%; P
PubMed ID
19363101 View in PubMed
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Adult glucose metabolism in extremely birthweight-discordant monozygotic twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120924
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
M. Frost
I. Petersen
K. Brixen
H. Beck-Nielsen
J J Holst
L. Christiansen
K. Højlund
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Twin Registry, Department of Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, JB Winsløvsvej 9, Odense C, Denmark. frostnielsen@yahoo.com
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Dec;55(12):3204-12
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility - blood - epidemiology
Female
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Insulin Resistance
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Low birthweight (BW) is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We compared glucose metabolism in adult BW-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins, thereby controlling for genetic factors and rearing environment.
Among 77,885 twins in the Danish Twin Registry, 155 of the most BW-discordant MZ twin pairs (median BW difference 0.5 kg) were assessed using a 2 h oral glucose tolerance test with sampling of plasma (p-)glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1. HOMA for beta cell function (HOMA-ß) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and also insulin sensitivity index (BIGTT-SI) and acute insulin response (BIGTT-AIR), were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed in those with: (1) double verification of BW difference; (2) difference in BW >0.5 kg; and (3) no overt metabolic disease (type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidaemia or thyroid disease).
No intra-pair differences in p-glucose, insulin, C-peptide, incretin hormones, HOMA-ß, HOMA-IR or BIGTT-SI were identified. p-Glucose at 120 min was higher in the twins with the highest BW without metabolic disease, and BIGTT-AIR was higher in those with the highest BW although not in pairs with a BW difference of >0.5 kg.
BW-discordant MZ twins provide no evidence for a detrimental effect of low BW on glucose metabolism in adulthood once genetic factors and rearing environment are controlled for.
PubMed ID
22955993 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of screening for gestational diabetes: a prospective cohort study in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209887
Source
J Med Screen. 1997;4(3):128-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
D. Kerbel
R. Glazier
S. Holzapfel
M. Yeung
S. Lofsky
Author Affiliation
Public Health Branch, Ontario Ministry of Health, Canada.
Source
J Med Screen. 1997;4(3):128-32
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - congenital - prevention & control
False Positive Reactions
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Neonatal Screening - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Abstract
To investigate the adverse effects associated with a false positive 50 g glucose challenge test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
Consecutive women attending a prenatal registration clinic at a large community hospital in suburban Toronto, Canada.
Prospective cohort study of women between 12 and 24 weeks' gestation with no previous history of diabetes mellitus or GDM. Main outcome measures included anxiety (Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), depression (Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), perceived maternal health, and concern about health of the newborn.
Among 2564 eligible subjects, there were 897 subjects with complete data at enrollment and at 32 weeks' gestation, including 88 who had false positive glucose challenge test results. At 32 weeks, only 20% (95% confidence limits 11%, 28%) of women with false positive glucose challenge test results rated their health as excellent, compared with 38% (35%, 42%) of those having negative results and those not tested (P = 0.001). These results were sustained at 36 weeks. There was no association between glucose challenge test result and the change in anxiety (P = 0.57), depression (P = 0.09) or concern about health of the newborn (P = 0.91) between baseline and 32 weeks' gestation, nor were these associations found at 36 weeks.
False positive glucose challenge test results are about six times more likely than true positive results in the general population. Pregnant women with false positive GDM screening results experience a significant decline in their perception of their own health. These adverse effects should be taken into account when deciding about a policy of screening all pregnant women for gestational diabetes.
PubMed ID
9368868 View in PubMed
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Age associated differences in prevalence of individual rotterdam criteria and metabolic risk factors during reproductive age in 446 caucasian women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126524
Source
Horm Metab Res. 2012 Sep;44(9):694-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
D. Glintborg
H. Mumm
P. Ravn
M. Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. d.glintborg@gmail.com
Source
Horm Metab Res. 2012 Sep;44(9):694-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Blood Glucose - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - blood
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Metabolic Syndrome X
Middle Aged
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Prevalence
Reproduction
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Clinical manifestations and metabolic risk factors may differ according to age in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Therefore, a retrospective trans-sectional study in academic tertiary-care medical center was designed. A cohort of 446 premenopausal, Caucasian women (age range 15-49 years) with PCOS were divided into 4 subgroups according to age: group 1 (15-19 years, n=42), group 2 (20-29 years, n=180), group 3 (30-39 years, n=187), group 4 (40-49 years, n=37) and underwent clinical evaluation (Ferriman-Gallwey score, BMI, waist, blood pressure), hormone analyses (sex hormones, fasting lipids, insulin, glucose), transvaginal ultrasound, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) (n=234), and ACTH tests (n=201). BMI, waist, Ferriman-Gallwey score, blood pressure, and lipid profile were higher in older vs. younger age groups whereas androgen levels were lower. Measures of insulin resistance were unchanged between age groups, but glucose levels were significantly higher in older age groups. Rotterdam criteria: The prevalence of PCO and biochemical hyperandrogenism decreased in the oldest age group whereas clinical hyperandrogenism increased. Young patients are characterized by PCO and biochemical hyperandrogenism, whereas older patients are more obese with more severe hirsutism and more cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors.
PubMed ID
22382934 View in PubMed
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621 records – page 1 of 63.