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Accuracy of GFR estimating equations in a large Swedish cohort: implications for radiologists in daily routine and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280255
Source
Acta Radiol. 2017 Mar;58(3):367-375
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Ulf Nyman
Anders Grubb
Veronica Lindström
Jonas Björk
Source
Acta Radiol. 2017 Mar;58(3):367-375
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Contrast Media - pharmacokinetics
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Iohexol - pharmacokinetics
Kidney Function Tests - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Radiologists
Radiology
Reproducibility of Results
Research
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Background Guidelines recommend estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) prior to iodine contrast media (CM) examinations. It is also recommended that absolute eGFR in mL/min, not commonly used relative GFR (adjusted to body surface area; mL/min/1.73?m(2)), should be preferred when dosing and evaluating toxicity of renally excreted drugs. Purpose To validate the absolute Lund-Malmö equation (LM-ABS) in comparison with the absolute Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation and the relative equations, revised Lund-Malmö (LM-REV), MDRD, and CKD-EPI, after converting relative estimates to absolute values, and to analyze change in eGFR classification when absolute instead of relative eGFR was used. Material and Methods A total of 3495 plasma clearance of iohexol to measure GFR (mGFR) served as reference test. Bias, precision, and accuracy (percentage of estimates ±30% of mGFR; P30) were compared overall and after stratification for various mGFR, eGFR, age, and BMI subgroups. Results The overall P30 results of CG/LM-ABS/LM-REV/MDRD/CKD-EPI were 62.8%/84.9%/83.7%/75.3%/75.6%, respectively. LM-ABS was the most stable equations across subgroups and the only equation that did not exhibit marked overestimation in underweight patients. For patients with relative eGFR 30-44 and 45-59?mL/min/1.73?m(2), 36% and 58% of men, respectively, and 24% and 32% of women, respectively, will have absolute eGFR values outside these relative eGFR intervals. Conclusion Choosing one equation to estimate GFR prior to contrast medium examinations, LM-ABS may be preferable. Unless absolute instead of relative eGFR are used, systematic inaccuracies in assessment of renal function may occur in daily routine and research on CM nephrotoxicity may be flawed.
PubMed ID
27166345 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury assessed by cystatin C after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and late renal dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267312
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Malin Johansson
Shahab Nozohoor
Henrik Bjursten
Per Ola Kimblad
Johan Sjögren
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - surgery
Biological Markers - blood
Creatinine - blood
Cystatin C - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate acute kidney injury (AKI) with cystatin C following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to assess the impact of postoperative AKI on outcome and late renal function.
A prospective study.
Single, tertiary referral center.
Sixty-eight consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and advanced comorbidity.
Blood samples were collected on 4 occasions pre- and postoperatively to determine levels of s-creatinine and cystatin C. Additionally, a sample was collected at followup 12 months postoperatively for the determination of s-creatinine.
The mean preoperative eGFR (s-creatinine) was 67±24 mL/min/1.73 m² compared to 45±21 mL/min/1.73 m² with eGFR (cystatin C) (p
PubMed ID
24315756 View in PubMed
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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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The association between glomerular filtration rate and left ventricular function in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264091
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2014 Nov;29(11):2069-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Elisabet Nerpin
Erik Ingelsson
Ulf Risérus
Johan Sundström
Bertil Andren
Elisabeth Jobs
Anders Larsson
Lind Lars
Johan Ärnlöv
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2014 Nov;29(11):2069-74
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardio-Renal Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Echocardiography
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Heart Ventricles - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke Volume - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Abstract
The cardiorenal syndrome, the detrimental bi-directional interplay between symptomatic heart failure and chronic kidney disease, is a major clinical challenge. Nonetheless, it is unknown if this interplay begins already at an asymptomatic stage. Therefore we investigated whether the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is associated with left ventricular function in participants free from clinical heart failure and with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >40% and with pre-specified sub-group analyses in individuals with a GFR >60 mL/min/m(2).
Two independent community-based cohorts were used; the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; n = 911; 50% women; mean age: 70 years) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n = 538; mean age: 71 years). We investigated cross-sectional association between cystatin C-based GFR (estimated glomerular function [eGFR]) and systolic (LVEF), diastolic- (isovolumic relaxation time [IVRT]) and global left ventricular function (myocardial performance index [MPI]) determined by echocardiography.
In both PIVUS and ULSAM, higher eGFR was significantly associated with higher LVEF (P = 0.004 [PIVUS] and P = 0.005 [ULSAM]). In PIVUS, higher eGFR was significantly associated with lower IVRT (P = 0.001) and MPI (P = 0.006), in age- and sex-adjusted models. After further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, the association between higher eGFR and higher LVEF was still statistically significant (P = 0.008 [PIVUS] and P = 0.02 [ULSAM]). In PIVUS, the age- and sex-adjusted association between eGFR and left ventricular function was similar in participants with eGFR >60 mL/min/m(2).
Our data suggest that the interplay between kidney and heart function begins prior to the development of symptomatic heart failure and kidney disease.
Notes
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Comment In: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2014 Nov;29(11):1989-9125209365
PubMed ID
24916339 View in PubMed
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Association of income level with kidney disease severity and progression among children and adolescents with CKD: a report from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108133
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2013 Dec;62(6):1087-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Guillermo Hidalgo
Derek K Ng
Marva Moxey-Mims
Maria Lourdes Minnick
Tom Blydt-Hansen
Bradley A Warady
Susan L Furth
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, East Carolina University School of Medicine, Greenville, NC.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2013 Dec;62(6):1087-94
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Pressure - physiology
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disease Progression
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Income
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
Among adults, lower socioeconomic status (SES) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), progression to end-stage renal disease, and poor health outcomes; but its impact on young people with CKD is not established.
Prospective cohort study.
572 children and adolescents aged 1-16 years with mild to moderate CKD residing in the United States and Canada who were enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study.
Self-reported annual household income category as a proxy measure for SES: =$75,000 (high income), $30,000 to
PubMed ID
23932090 View in PubMed
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Association of kidney function and albuminuria with cardiovascular mortality in older vs younger individuals: The HUNT II Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85184
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2007 Dec 10;167(22):2490-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2007
Author
Hallan Stein
Astor Brad
Romundstad Solfrid
Aasarød Knut
Kvenild Kurt
Coresh Josef
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU St Olav University Hospital, Olav Kyrres gt 17, Trondheim, Norway. stein.hallan@ntnu.no
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2007 Dec 10;167(22):2490-6
Date
Dec-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - metabolism - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cardiovascular risk implications of a combined assessment of reduced kidney function and microalbuminuria are unknown. In elderly persons, traditional cardiovascular risk factors are less predictive, and measures of end organ damage, such as kidney disease, may be needed for improved cardiovascular mortality risk stratification. METHODS: The glomerular filtration rate was estimated from calibrated serum creatinine, and the urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in 3 urine samples in 9,709 participants of the second Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT II), a Norwegian community-based health study, followed for 8.3 years with a 71% participation rate. RESULTS: An estimated glomerular filtration rate (EGFR) at levels of less than 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was associated with higher cardiovascular mortality risk, whereas a higher ACR was associated with higher risk with no lower limit. Low EGFR and albuminuria were synergistic cardiovascular mortality risk factors. Compared with subjects with an EGFR greater than 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and ACR below the sex-specific median who were at the lowest risk, subjects with an EGFR of less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and microalbuminuria had an adjusted incidence rate ratio of 6.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.0-15.1; P
PubMed ID
18071172 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure in children with chronic kidney disease: a report from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155512
Source
Hypertension. 2008 Oct;52(4):631-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Joseph T Flynn
Mark Mitsnefes
Christopher Pierce
Steven R Cole
Rulan S Parekh
Susan L Furth
Bradley A Warady
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital & Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.
Source
Hypertension. 2008 Oct;52(4):631-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To characterize the distribution of blood pressure (BP), prevalence, and risk factors for hypertension in pediatric chronic kidney disease, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline BPs in 432 children (mean age 11 years; 60% male; mean glomerular filtration rate 44 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)) enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study. BPs were obtained using an aneroid sphygmomanometer. Glomerular filtration rate was measured by iohexol disappearance. Elevated BP was defined as BP >or=90th percentile for age, gender, and height. Hypertension was defined as BP >or=95th percentile or as self-reported hypertension plus current treatment with antihypertensive medications. For systolic BP, 14% were hypertensive and 11% were prehypertensive (BP 90th to 95th percentile); 68% of subjects with elevated systolic BP were taking antihypertensive medications. For diastolic BP, 14% were hypertensive and 9% were prehypertensive; 53% of subjects with elevated diastolic BP were taking antihypertensive medications. Fifty-four percent of subjects had either systolic or diastolic BP >or=95th percentile or a history of hypertension plus current antihypertensive use. Characteristics associated with elevated BP included black race, shorter duration of chronic kidney disease, absence of antihypertensive medication use, and elevated serum potassium. Among subjects receiving antihypertensive treatment, uncontrolled BP was associated with male sex, shorter chronic kidney disease duration, and absence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker use. Thirty-seven percent of children with chronic kidney disease had either elevated systolic or diastolic BP, and 39% of these were not receiving antihypertensives, indicating that hypertension in pediatric chronic kidney disease may be frequently under- or even untreated. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers may improve BP control in these patients.
Notes
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Comment In: Hypertension. 2008 Oct;52(4):610-218725582
PubMed ID
18725579 View in PubMed
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Calculation of glomerular filtration rate expressed in mL/min from plasma cystatin C values in mg/L.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30442
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
A. Larsson
J. Malm
A. Grubb
L O Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.larsson@clm.uas.lul.se
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(1):25-30
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Creatinine - blood - metabolism
Cystatins - blood - metabolism
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Iohexol - pharmacokinetics
Kidney - metabolism - physiology
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate - physiology
Middle Aged
Abstract
The Cockcroft Gault formula is often used to calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from plasma creatinine results. In Sweden this calculation is not usually done in the laboratory, but locally in the wards. These manual calculations could cause erroneous results. In several studies plasma cystatin C has been shown to be superior to plasma creatinine for estimation of GFR. One limitation of using cystatin C as a GFR marker is that there is no conversion formula transforming cystatin C expressed as mg/L to GFR expressed as mL/min. In this study plasma creatinine and cystatin C were compared with iohexol clearance. A stronger correlation (p
PubMed ID
15025426 View in PubMed
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Canadian survey of clinical status at dialysis initiation 1998-1999: a multicenter prospective survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188002
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2002 Oct;58(4):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
B M Curtis
B J Barret
K. Jindal
O. Djurdjev
A. Levin
P. Barre
K. Bernstein
P. Blake
E. Carlisle
P. Cartier
C. Clase
B. Culleton
C. Deziel
S. Donnelly
J. Ethier
A. Fine
G. Ganz
M. Goldstein
J. Kappel
G. Karr
S. Langlois
D. Mendelssohn
N. Muirhead
B. Murphy
G. Pylpchuk
E. Toffelmire
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2002 Oct;58(4):282-8
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Food Habits
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Serum Albumin - metabolism
Treatment Outcome
Urban health
Abstract
The current growth in end-stage kidney disease populations has led to increased efforts to understand the impact of status at dialysis initiation on long-term outcomes. Our main objective was to improve the understanding of current Canadian nephrology practice between October 1998 and December 1999.
Fifteen nephrology centers in 7 provinces participated in a prospective data collection survey. The main outcome of interest was the clinical status at dialysis initiation determined by: residual kidney function, preparedness for chronic dialysis as measured by presence or absence of permanent peritoneal or hemodialysis access, hemoglobin and serum albumin. Uremic symptoms at dialysis initiation were also recorded, however, in some cases these symptom data were obtained retrospectively.
Data on 251 patients during 1-month periods were collected. Patients commenced dialysis at mean calculated creatinine clearance levels of approximately 10 ml/min, with an average of 3 symptoms. 35% of patients starting dialysis had been known to nephrologists for less than 3 months. These patients are more likely to commence without permanent access and with lower hemoglobin and albumin levels. Even of those known to nephrologists, only 66% had permanent access in place.
Patients commencing dialysis in Canada appear to be doing so in relative concordance with published guidelines with respect to timing of initiation. Despite an increased awareness of kidney disease, a substantial number of patients continues to commence dialysis without previous care by a nephrologist. Of those who are seen by nephrologists, clinical and laboratory parameters are suboptimal according to current guidelines. This survey serves as an important baseline for future comparisons after the implementation of educational strategies for referring physicians and nephrologists.
PubMed ID
12400843 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular medication in relation to renal function after coronary artery bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260160
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 9;168(4):4033-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2013
Author
Ulrik Sartipy
Erik Rampell
Axel C Carlsson
Per Wändell
Martin J Holzmann
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 9;168(4):4033-8
Date
Oct-9-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - trends
Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Kidney - drug effects - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Guidelines for recommended medication use for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease are exceedingly important in patients with chronic kidney disease. Despite a high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events, these patients are less likely to use evidence-based recommended medications. The objective of the current study was to analyze the association between renal function and guideline-recommended drug therapy in patients with coronary heart disease.
In this nationwide population-based cohort study, we included 12,332 patients with established coronary heart disease who underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting in Sweden between 2005 and 2008. Medication use was retrieved from the national Prescribed Drug Register.
During the first year after coronary surgery, 94% of patients had at least two dispensed prescriptions for an antiplatelet agent, 68% for an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker, 92% for a beta-blocker, and 93% for a statin. Only 57% of all patients had prescriptions for all four medication classes. Reduced renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30 to 45 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) and 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)).
In patients with established coronary heart disease, moderate to severe renal dysfunction was associated with significantly lower use of guideline-recommend medications as compared to normal renal function.
PubMed ID
23880581 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.