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A 3-year follow-up study of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195752
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Sjögren
S O Hedlund
C. Jonsson
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Materials Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Goran.Sjogren@odont.umu.se
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicuspid
Ceramics - chemistry
Color
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Plaque - classification
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Glass - chemistry
Humans
Inlays - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Molar
Quartz - chemistry
Surface Properties
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.
Nine Class I and 30 Class II beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations were placed in 16 patients who were seen regularly by personnel at Umeå University Dental School. The California Dental Association criteria were used to evaluate the restorations at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years after luting. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity, the time taken to manufacture each restoration, and certain periodontal conditions were also evaluated.
Sixty-nine percent of the restorations were rated satisfactory at the 3-year examination. During the follow-up period, 4 became loose and 7 were fractured or had flaking surfaces. Caries was registered in connection with 1 restoration. Excellent ratings were obtained for marginal integrity, anatomic form, surface, and color in 62%, 84%, 32%, and 44% of the restorations, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing in comparison with the controls. The mean overall time for placement was 38 minutes. The estimated survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 59% after 3.5 years.
The quality of the beta-quartz glass-ceramic restorations in the present study was inferior to that presented in most earlier studies of ceramic or resin composite posterior restorations placed in patients treated at university clinics. Both the technique and the beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have to be evaluated in more long-term studies to assess the possibility of their serving as an alternative restorative technique.
PubMed ID
11203902 View in PubMed
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[Adhesion and colonisation of the glass surface by Thiobacillus thioparus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and their biculture]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61427
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
M O Protasova
V M Sobko
I P Kozlova
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):57-63
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Adhesion - physiology
Biofilms - growth & development
English Abstract
Glass
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia - growth & development - physiology
Thiobacillus - growth & development - physiology
Abstract
The thionic bacteria Thiobacillus thioparus and its natural sattelite Stenotrophomonas maltophilia have been isolated from the soil, adjacent to the surface of Kyiv underground tunnel. The sterile glass, was used as a model surface which imitates the hydrophilic model surface. Beijerinck nutrition media were inoculated by pure and mixed culture of T. thioparus. Some differences in adhesion by mono- and mixed cultures were shown. Hemolithotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria could be interrelated and this could influence the biofilm formation. The formation of biofilm of T. thioparus mixed culture occurs more actively in comparison with the pure culture.
PubMed ID
16493886 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A. Jokstad
I A Mjör
V. Qvist
Author Affiliation
Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Composite Resins - chemistry
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Amalgam - chemistry
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Glass Ionomer Cements - chemistry
Gold Alloys - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Middle Aged
Scandinavia
Time Factors
Abstract
In a cross-sectional survey the age of restorations in situ was recorded in three patient groups. Group A were randomly examined regular attenders, group B were irregular attenders randomly chosen from patient treatment records, and in group C the age of posterior gold and composite resin restorations was recorded in selected regular attenders. The study material included 8310 restorations in group A, 1281 in group B, and 500 restorations in group C. The three materials amalgam, composite, and gold accounted for more than 90% of all restorations. In group A 3.3% of the restorations were scheduled for replacement. The most prevalent reasons for replacement were secondary caries, bulk fractures of the restoration, and tooth fractures. The median age of the failed restorations was fairly similar to the median age of the acceptable restorations in situ among the regular patients (group A). The data indicate median ages of 20 years for gold restorations, 12-14 years for amalgam restorations, and 7-8 years for composite resin restorations. The restoration ages were influenced by the type and size of the restoration, the restorative material used, and possibly also the intra-oral location of the restorations.
PubMed ID
7985509 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of associations of polymorphic loci of a tumor suppressor gene TP53 with malignant neoplasms in glass fiber manufacturing workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263733
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
G F Mukhammadiyeva
A B Bakirov
L K Karimova
E T Valeyeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):59-61
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Genes, p53 - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Glass
Humans
Keratosis - chemically induced - genetics
Manufacturing Industry
Occupational Diseases - etiology - genetics
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Russia
Skin Neoplasms - chemically induced - genetics
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - genetics
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to determine the role of TP53 tumor suppressor gene polymorphisms in the occurrence of skin malignant neoplasms in glass fiber manufacturing workers. We carried out a comparative study of polymorphous loci Arg72Pro and dup16bp in TP53 gene in workers with skin cancer and hyperkeratosis (n = 68), occupied in continuous glass fiber manufacture, and in healthy workers (n = 52). The associations of both Pro and dup16 minor alleles of TP53 gene, and Arg/Pro-W/dup16 genotype combination with higher risks for skin oncologic diseases of occupational genesis have been revealed.
PubMed ID
25842498 View in PubMed
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Assessing toxicity of metal contaminated soil from glassworks sites with a battery of biotests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294577
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Feb 01; 613-614:30-38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-01-2018
Author
M Hagner
M Romantschuk
O-P Penttinen
A Egfors
C Marchand
A Augustsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Lahti, Finland; Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Jokioinen, Finland.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Feb 01; 613-614:30-38
Date
Feb-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aliivibrio fischeri - drug effects
Animals
Environmental pollution
Glass
Lepidium sativum - drug effects
Manufacturing Industry
Metals, Heavy - toxicity
Nematoda - drug effects
Oligochaeta - drug effects
Soil
Soil Pollutants - toxicity
Sweden
Toxicity Tests
Abstract
The present study addresses toxicological properties of metal contaminated soils, using glassworks sites in south-eastern Sweden as study objects. Soil from five selected glassworks sites as well as from nearby reference areas were analysed for total and water-soluble metal concentrations and general geochemical parameters. A battery of biotests was then applied to assess the toxicity of the glassworks soil environments: a test of phytotoxicity with garden cress (Lepidium sativum); the BioTox™ test for toxicity to bacteria using Vibrio fischeri; and analyses of abundancies and biomass of nematodes and enchytraeids. The glassworks- and reference areas were comparable with respect to pH and the content of organic matter and nutrients (C, N, P), but total metal concentrations (Pb, As, Ba, Cd and Zn) were significantly higher at the former sites. Higher metal concentrations in the water-soluble fraction were also observed, even though these concentrations were low compared to the total ones. Nevertheless, toxicity of the glassworks soils was not detected by the two ex situ tests; inhibition of light emission by V. fischeri could not be seen, nor was an effect seen on the growth of L. sativum. A decrease in enchytraeid and nematode abundance and biomass was, however, observed for the landfill soils as compared to reference soils, implying in situ toxicity to soil-inhabiting organisms. The confirmation of in situ bioavailability and negative effects motivates additional studies of the risk posed to humans of the glassworks villages.
PubMed ID
28903077 View in PubMed
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[Basic problems of work hygiene in the manufacture of glass facing tile].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254924
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1973 Feb;17(2):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1973

[Bottle injuries in Denmark 1991-1995]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33864
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 May 18;160(21):3079-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-1998
Author
K K Nielsen
D. Dalgaard
K. Hougaard
Author Affiliation
Randers Centralsygehus, ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 May 18;160(21):3079-81
Date
May-18-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergencies
English Abstract
Female
Glass
Hand Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - epidemiology - etiology
Wounds, Penetrating - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
In the period from 1991-95, 1843 injuries caused by bottles were reported to the Danish EHLASS register, the latter representing 14.2% of the total number of patients seen in the Emergency Room in Denmark. The reports were classified as sharp or blunt injuries; age, sex, and body localisation were registered, and the injuries were grouped into eight body localisations. Hand injuries made up largest group (62%), and of these 92% were sharp injuries. The rest of the injuries (38%) were spread over the other zones, each representing 3-11%. Among the injuries there was a significant overrepresentation of males and young people between 10-24 years of age. Nearly 30% of the injuries were associated with a fall. We estimate that the total number of injuries caused by bottles was 2596/year, and that the incidence rate was 4.98/10,000 person years.
PubMed ID
9621782 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk among glass factory workers: an excess of lung cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227888
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Dec;47(12):815-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
R. Sankila
S. Karjalainen
E. Pukkala
H. Oksanen
T. Hakulinen
L. Teppo
M. Hakama
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Dec;47(12):815-8
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glass
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
A total of 3749 workers employed for at least three months in two Finnish glass factories (cohorts A and B) were followed up for cancer in 1953-86 through the Finnish Cancer Registry. In cohort A (1353 men, 1261 women), 106 primary cancers were diagnosed among men, and their standardised incidence ratio (SIR) for all cancers was 99. Among women the risk was low (65 cases, SIR 64). In cohort B (450 men, 685 women), the relative risk of cancer was close to unity for both men (57 cases) and women (75 cases). The risk of cancer was analysed by primary site, type of work, years since first exposure, and age at diagnosis. The only significantly increased risks were those of lung cancer among men (SIR 130, 95% CI 100-167, cohorts A and B combined), and skin cancer among glass blowers (SIR 625, 95% CI 129-1827). An increased risk of lung, stomach, and colon cancer as well as of brain tumours has been reported in previous studies. It is postulated that the excess risk of lung cancer, detected in this study, can also be accounted for by lifestyle, and not only by possible occupational exposures, because a similar excess risk of lung cancer has been found previously for all industrial workers in Finland. Although the risk of stomach cancer in this study was increased among glass blowers, it was not high in the largest groups of plain glass workers. The risks of tumours of the central nervous system and colon were not increased either.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 May;37(2):180-47426468
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1983;4(4):565-756869381
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1983 Sep;12(3):290-66629617
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Oct;10(5):325-66523098
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1985 Jun;42(6):411-44005195
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1986 Oct;77(4):883-93020298
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1989;15(6):699-7172665480
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):66-83819887
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(7):601-63589754
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Oct;13(5):412-63433043
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1988;13(1):105-183344750
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1988 Jul;45(7):450-83395581
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1987 Feb;78(2):253-73468289
PubMed ID
2271387 View in PubMed
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[Can wounds caused by breaking window glass be prevented?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38918
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Mar 23;149(13):873-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1987

112 records – page 1 of 12.