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A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
R. Kanerva
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Institute of Dentistry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia - complications
Case-Control Studies
Cold Temperature - diagnostic use
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Dentin Sensitivity - etiology - prevention & control
Eating Disorders - complications
Educational Status
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gastroesophageal Reflux - etiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Interviews as Topic
Periodontal Index
Risk factors
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Tooth Abrasion - etiology
Tooth Attrition - etiology
Tooth Erosion - etiology - prevention & control
Touch
Xerostomia - physiopathology
Abstract
Eating disorders are often associated with regurgitation of gastric contents into the mouth and dental erosion. In this study the dental status was evaluated in bulimic patients. Thirty-five bulimics, diagnosed in the Outpatient Departments of Psychiatry and Adolescent Psychiatry of the University Central Hospital in Helsinki, and 105 controls matched for age, sex, and educational level were examined clinically, and the factors associated with dental erosion and caries were evaluated in an interview. Severe dental erosion and dental caries were significantly commoner among bulimics than controls. Bulimics commonly had a low salivary flow rate, but other apparent risk factors of dental erosion did not differ from those of controls. A feeling of dry mouth was commoner among bulimics than controls, and bulimics had an increased tooth sensitivity to cold and touch. More should be done to protect teeth from dental erosion among bulimics, because loss of tooth tissue remains even if the eating disorder disappears.
PubMed ID
9537733 View in PubMed
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Effects of polyol and sucrose candies on plaque, gingivitis and lactobacillus index scores. Observations on Helsinki school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13124
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1978;36(4):237-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978

The onset of diabetes and poor metabolic control increases gingival bleeding in children and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34542
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1996 Dec;23(12):1060-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
K M Karjalainen
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1996 Dec;23(12):1060-7
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - drug therapy - metabolism
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingivitis - etiology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Periodontal Index
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Gingival health (bleeding on probing) and oral hygiene (plaque percent) were assessed in 2 groups of children and adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). 1st study group included 12 newly diagnosed diabetic children and adolescents (age range 6.3-14.0 years, 5 boys and 7 girls). They were examined on the 3rd day after initial hospital admission and at 2 weeks and 6 weeks after initiation of insulin treatment. Gingival bleeding decreased after 2 weeks of insulin treatment (37.8% versus 19.0%, p
PubMed ID
8997648 View in PubMed
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Peri-implantitis in partially edentulous patients: association with inadequate plaque control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90843
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2009 Feb;20(2):169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Serino Giovanni
Ström Christer
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Södra Alvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden. giovanni.serino@vgregion.se
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2009 Feb;20(2):169-74
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - etiology - radiography
Dental Implants - adverse effects
Dental Plaque - complications - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Prosthesis Design
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - rehabilitation
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - etiology
Periodontitis - etiology
Predictive value of tests
Radiography, Panoramic
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to describe some clinical periodontal features of partially edentulous patients referred for the treatment of peri-implantitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The 23 subjects involved in this study were selected from consecutive patients referred to the department of Periodontology Södra Alvsborgs Hospital, Borås, Sweden, for treatment of peri-implantitis during 2006. The patients had clinical signs of peri-implantitis around one or more dental implants (i.e.>or=6 mm pockets, bleeding on pockets and/or pus and radiographic images of bone loss to>or=3 threads of the implants) and remaining teeth in the same and/or opposite jaw. The following clinical variables were recorded: Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) Probing Pocket Depth (PPD), Access/capability to oral hygiene at implant site (yes/no), Function Time. The patients were categorized in the following sub-groups: Periodontitis/No periodontitis, Bone loss/No bone loss at teeth, Smoker/Non-smokers. RESULTS: Out of the 23 patients, the majority (13) had minimal bone loss at teeth and no current periodontitis; 5 had bone loss at teeth exceeding 1/3 of the length of the root but not current periodontitis and only 5 had current periodontitis. Six patients were smokers (i.e. smoking more than 10 cig/day). The site level analysis showed that only 17 (6%) of the 281 teeth present had >or=1 pocket of >or=6mm, compared to 58 (53%) of the total 109 implants (28 ITI and 81 Brånemark); 74% of the implants had no accessibility to proper oral hygiene. High proportion of implants with diagnosis of peri-implantitis were associated with no accessibility/capability for appropriate oral hygiene measures, while accessibility/capability was rarely associated with peri-implantitis. Indeed 48% of the implants presenting peri-implantitis were those with no accessibility/capability for proper oral hygiene (65% positive predict value) with respect to 4% of the implants with accessibility/capability (82% negative predict value). CONCLUSION: The results of the study indicate that local factors such as accessibility for oral hygiene at the implant sites seems to be related to the presence or absence of peri-implantitis. Peri-implantitis was a frequent finding in subjects having signs of minimal loss of supporting bone around the remaining natural dentition and no signs of presence of periodontitis (i.e. presence of periodontal pockets of >or=6 mm at natural teeth). Only 6 of the examinated subjects were smokers. In view of these results we should like to stress the importance of giving proper oral hygiene instructions to the patients who are rehabilitated with dental implant and of proper prosthetic constructions that allow accessibility for oral hygiene around implants.
PubMed ID
19077152 View in PubMed
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Seafaring: a risk for seamen's oral health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214199
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Oct;53(5):275-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
T. Holttinen
H. Saarni
H. Murtomaa
J. Pentti
I. Alvesalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Oct;53(5):275-8
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Dental Care
Denture, Complete
Denture, Partial, Removable
Female
Finland
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Male
Mastication
Mouth Diseases - etiology
Naval Medicine
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Risk factors
Ships
Sick Leave
Tooth Diseases - etiology
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Information about the oral status and dental health behavior and the working history of 369 Finnish seamen on different types of ships was gathered by means of a questionnaire. A control group of workers on shore was formed for sailors 35-44 years of age. Removable dentures were worn by 16% of the seamen. Oral disorders during the week before the study were reported by one-third. During the previous 2 years 14% of the sailors had had at least one episode of oral troubles, 15% twice and 9% three or even more times. One-third of seamen with oral trouble had needed pain-killing tablets or antibiotics. Sick leave days had been needed by 3% of respondents during the previous 2 years because of oral disorder (mean length of sick leave period was 1.4 days). The control group reported gum bleeding more often than the seafarers. Even though there were no signs of poorer dental condition in sailors than in the controls on shore, the possibility that the seafaring could constitute a risk for the oral health of seamen in other age groups cannot be excluded.
PubMed ID
8553801 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.