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Source
CANNT J. 2013 Apr-Jun;23(2):59-60
Publication Type
Article

The anatomy of a forbidden desire: men, penetration and semen exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175938
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Dave Holmes
Dan Warner
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5. dholmes@uottawa.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Condoms - utilization
Drive
Europe
Gift Giving
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Pleasure-Pain Principle
Postmodernism
Professional Role
Psychoanalytic Interpretation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Semen
Symbolism
Taboo - psychology
Unsafe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The rising popularity of unprotected anal sex (bareback sex) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is perplexing healthcare providers working in sexual health clinics. Epidemiological research on the topic overlooks several socio-cultural and psychological dimensions. Our research attempts to construct an appropriate theoretical edifice by which we can understand this sexual practice. In order to achieve this objective, a qualitative design was selected and 18 semiconductive in-depth interviews were carried out with barebackers from five European and North American cities. We then analyzed the data using two theoretical approaches that were sensitive to the issues of desire, transgression and pleasure. These theories are those of the late French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, and those of poststructural thinkers, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. These theoretical frameworks helped shed light on the significance of bareback sex, and can potentially influence healthcare providers in gaining a better understanding not only of their clients, but also of their own role in the circuitry of desire at work within bareback. We found that while the exchange of semen constitutes a dangerous and irrational practice to healthcare professionals, it is nevertheless a significant variable in the sexual lives of barebackers that needs to be taken into consideration in the provision of healthcare services.
PubMed ID
15743438 View in PubMed
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[A pathologist who has given hundreds of light years to Amnesty].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181606
Source
Duodecim. 2003;119(23):2351-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

Bioethics for clinicians: 17. Conflict of interest in research, education and patient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203787
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1998
Author
T. Lemmens
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ont. trudo.lemmens@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):960-5
Date
Oct-20-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethics
Biomedical research
Canada
Conflict of Interest
Disclosure
Education, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Empirical Research
Ethics, Medical
Gift Giving
Health Policy
Humans
Patient Care - standards
Research - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Social Control, Formal
Trust
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
A conflict of interest occurs in a situation in which professional judgement regarding a primary interest, such as research, education or patient care, may be unduly influenced by a secondary interest, such as financial gain or personal prestige. Conflicts of interest exist in every walk of life, including medicine and science. There is nothing inherently unethical in finding oneself in a conflict of interest. Rather, the key questions are whether one recognizes the conflict and how one deals with it. Strategies include disclosing the conflict, establishing a system of review and authorization, and prohibiting the activities that lead to the conflict.
Notes
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;42(7):764-709307838
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Apr 1;279(13):1031-29533505
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Apr 1;279(13):995-99533497
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Jan 8;338(2):101-69420342
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Nov 15;157(10):1373-49371067
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Feb 1;156(3):363-49033417
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Feb 1;156(3):351-69033415
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Nov 1;155(9):1243-88911290
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1744-68646666
Cites: Am J Law Med. 1995;21(2-3):259-808571978
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Sep 1;153(5):553-97641153
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Aug 15;153(4):398-97634216
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Nov 1;151(9):1320-27954182
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):951-38131127
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Nov 15;149(10):1401-78221424
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Aug 19;329(8):573-68336759
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Aug 19;329(8):570-18204121
Cites: JAMA. 1991 May 8;265(18):2304-52016819
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Oct 3;264(13):1693-72398609
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Jul 5;323(1):562355959
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Dec 22-29;262(24):3448-512585690
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1986 May-Jun;1(3):155-83772583
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Sep 19;313(12):749-514033698
Cites: Am J Med. 1982 Jul;73(1):4-87091173
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1998 Mar;13(3):151-49541370
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):78410189418
PubMed ID
9834723 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Oct 5;182(14):1588
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2010
Author
James Downar
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Oct 5;182(14):1588
Date
Oct-5-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Gift Giving
Hospitals
Humans
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Research Support as Topic
Notes
Cites: J Behav Med. 2000 Aug;23(4):367-7610984865
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 May 29;336(22):1569-749164814
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2006 Aug;7(8):668-7516887484
Cites: Cancer Res. 2009 Aug 15;69(16):6500-519679548
Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Jan 11;183(1):8321220465
PubMed ID
20837682 View in PubMed
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A case for permitting altruistic surrogacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212168
Source
Hypatia. 1996;11(2):34-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B M Baker
Source
Hypatia. 1996;11(2):34-48
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Altruism
Canada
Child
Coercion
Commodification
Empathy
Ethics
Family
Family Relations
Female
Feminism
Gift Giving
Government Regulation
Humans
Infertility
Informed consent
Male
Motivation
Pregnancy
Public Policy
Reproduction
Risk assessment
Self Concept
Social Dominance
Stereotyping
Surrogate Mothers
Abstract
Canada's Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies rejects all forms of surrogacy arrangement under the rubric of objecting to commercial surrogacy. Noncommercial surrogacy arrangements, however, can be defended against the commission's objections. They can be viewed as cases of giving a benefit or service to another in a way that expresses benevolence, and establishes a relationship between surrogates and prospective 'social' parents that allows mutual understanding and reciprocal personal interaction between them.
PubMed ID
11865873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dual relationship activities: principal component analysis of counselors' attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183345
Source
Ethics Behav. 2003;13(2):191-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Tracey Nigro
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria, 1233 Roy Rd., Victoria, BC, Canada V8Z 2X8, Canada. tnigro@telus.net
Source
Ethics Behav. 2003;13(2):191-201
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Counseling - ethics
Data Collection
Empirical Research
Ethics, Professional
Friends
Gift Giving - ethics
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Professional Misconduct
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Psychology
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
The British Columbian Members of the Canadian Guidance and Counselling Association were surveyed to explore their attitudes regarding dual relationships. Of 529 deliverable surveys, 206 usable returns yielded a response rate of 39%. The survey instrument collected data regarding respondents' characteristics and ethicality ratings of 39 dual relationship activity items. An exploratory principal components analysis was performed on responses, resulting in a 4-factor equation, which accounted for 44% of the total variance. The results suggest that, although conceptual considerations of dual relationship typology do underlay the resultant factors, the relative ethicality of each item is also influential.
PubMed ID
14552314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exceptional nontraditional caring practices of nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187711
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Dec;16(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Olive Yonge
Anita Molzahn
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. olive.yonge@ualberta.ca
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Dec;16(4):399-405
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Attitude of Health Personnel
Beneficence
Canada
Empathy
Female
Gift Giving
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Philosophy, Nursing
Questionnaires
Abstract
There has been little research that has addressed the practices of nurses who go beyond the usual scope of practice to demonstrate caring. In this study, a grounded theory methodology was used to interview 18 nurses identified as exceptional caring nurses. The core process identified was giving and involved gifts (particularly of time), responsibility and choice, teaching, vulnerability, preserving dignity, caring with and for coworkers, being truly present, and always finding a way. Although the findings of this study are not necessarily generalizable, it is important to acknowledge that these practices occur and that they should not automatically be discredited. The research has implications for the new emerging field of boundaries in professional relationships.
PubMed ID
12445110 View in PubMed
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Interactions with the pharmaceutical industry: a survey of family medicine residents in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210769
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 1;155(9):1243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1996
Author
M D Sergeant
P G Hodgetts
M. Godwin
D M Walker
P. McHenry
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 1;155(9):1243-8
Date
Nov-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug Industry
Family Practice
Female
Gift Giving
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internship and Residency
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
To determine the attitudes, knowledge and practices of family medicine residents relating to the pharmaceutical industry and to assess the effectiveness of existing guidelines on appropriate interactions with the pharmaceutical industry.
Survey by mailed questionnaire.
Ontario.
All 262 second-year family medicine residents in Ontario (seven centres); 226 (86.3%) responded.
Fifty-two (23.0%) of the residents who responded stated that they had read the CMA policy statement on appropriate interactions between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry. A total of 124 (54.9%) stated that they would attend a private dinner paid for by a pharmaceutical representative; the proportion was not significantly reduced among those who had read the CMA guidelines, which prohibit the acceptance of personal gifts. In all, 186 (82.3%) reported that they would like the opportunity to interact with pharmaceutical representatives in an educational setting, even though several programs now discourage these interactions. Approximately three quarters (172/226 [76.1%]) of the residents indicated that they plan to see pharmaceutical representatives in their future practice. Residents at Centre 2 were significantly more critical of the pharmaceutical industry than those from the other centres. Overall, being aware of, and familiar with, departmental policy or CMA policy on interactions with the pharmaceutical industry did not affect the residents' attitudes or intended future practices.
The presence of guidelines concerning physicians' interactions with the pharmaceutical industry does not appear to have a significant impact on family medicine residents in Ontario.
Notes
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 1988;8(1):13-2010294441
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Dec 22-29;262(24):3448-512585690
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1987 Jun;24(6):612-63585265
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Nov 15;149(10):1401-78221424
PubMed ID
8911290 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.