Skip header and navigation

Refine By

211 records – page 1 of 22.

[10-year cytodiagnosis of cervical carcinoma: results and further developments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111744
Source
Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. 1966 Aug;26(8):1135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1966

Abortion, 1973: some recent world events in relation to pregnancy termination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66364
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1974
Source
Trans Aust Med Congr. 1974 Jun 1;1(5):27-30
Date
Jun-1-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Americas
Developed Countries
Europe
Europe, Eastern
Family Planning Services
France
Germany, East
Germany, West
Great Britain
Italy
Netherlands
North America
Norway
Scandinavia
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This selective report notes recent events relating to pregnancy termination in the U.S., France, England, Italy, East and West Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the Netherlands. Due to the Supreme Court decision in January 1973, abortion is now legal in the U.S. Although abortions is illegal in France, an estimated 400,000-1,000,000 clandestine abortions occur each year. Although abortions are legal in Britain, the ease with which they can be obtained varies regionally. As of March 1973, contraceptives are part of Britain's National Health Service. In Italy, a bill to legalize abortion has been introduced in Parliament, though there is little likelihood of its passing. In East Germany, abortion can be granted for medical or social reasons, while in West Germany, the governmental policies are more conservative, resulting in an abundance of illegal abortions performed by physicians. There is a trend toward easier abortion laws in Norway and Sweden. Little is happening in the Netherlands as far as liberalizing the abortion laws. Rather liberal grounds for pregnancy termination exist in China (though emphasis is on contraception), India, Russia, and Eastern Europe (with the exception of Romania). Abortion is frowned upon in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East resulting in a large number of illegal abortions. It is concluded that there is liberalized abortion in communist bloc countries, there is trend toward liberalizing abortion in a large group of western countries, and tradition and religion are responsible for conservative abortion laws in a third group of countries.
PubMed ID
12333737 View in PubMed
Less detail

[AIDS and drug addicts in the view of an epidemiologist]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8724
Source
AIDS Forsch. 1987 Jun;(6):323-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
B. Velimirovic
Source
AIDS Forsch. 1987 Jun;(6):323-34
Date
Jun-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Asia
Asia, Western
Austria
Behavior
Belgium
Denmark
Developed Countries
Disease
English Abstract
Europe
Germany, West
Great Britain
Greece
HIV Infections
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Malta
Netherlands
Norway
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Portugal
Scandinavia
Sexual Behavior
Social Problems
Spain
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
Switzerland
Therapeutics
Virus Diseases
Abstract
Data from 12 different European countries show a rapid increase in HIV antibody positivity among drug users or a high degree of contamination already reached wherever studies have been made. Until 31 December 1986, 698 (18%) of AIDS cases were among drug users, of which 600 (15%) of AIDS cases were solely drug users, and 98 (3%) were in addition homosexual or bisexual. A further increase is expected. Because of the epidemiological importance for transmission to the heterosexual population, this problem has become a focus of attention. Drug abusing prostitutes constitute a major source of infection for the heterosexual population and newborns. The increase in the number of AIDS cases in 1986 among male drug abusers was 98 - that is up 61% compared to previous years; among women, the increase was 56%. The 3 main approaches to solution of this problem, i.e. interdiction of the drug trade, availability of sterile needles, and an education program have not proven as successful as anticipated. Relevant indications of the progress of infection in society can only be obtained by systematic observation of conversion rates in differential subgroups, i.e. drug abusers, newly incarcerated drug abusers, male and female prostitutes who use drugs, and individuals newly reporting for treatment. Separation of HIV antibody positives and negatives in therapeutic communities which are not drug free is recommended for epidemiological purposes in view of the developments to date. Nor should forced segregation of the infected from noninfected be dismissed out of hand.
PubMed ID
12281241 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air-transport of a paralysed patient under artificial respiration from Ingolstadt to Oslo (author's transl)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254392
Source
Anaesthesist. 1973 Sep;22(9):408-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1973

All payer, single payer, managed care, no payer: patients' perspectives in three nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213503
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1996;15(2):254-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Donelan
R J Blendon
J. Benson
R. Leitman
H. Taylor
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1996;15(2):254-65
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Fee-for-Service Plans
Female
Germany, West
Humans
Internationality
Male
Managed Care Programs
Middle Aged
National health programs - organization & administration
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Random Allocation
Single-Payer System
United States
Abstract
We present data on patients' experiences with access to and cost and quality of health services in the United States, Canada, and Germany. In general, patients report favorably about their care. U.S. respondents report more problems with access to care, even controlling for the severe problems of the uninsured. Differences in managed care versus fee-for-service plans in the United States mirror some of the problems observed in international comparisons--access to specialists and tests and waiting times for and quality of some services. Different cost containment strategies have measurable effects on patients' perspectives, particularly among patients who are sicker.
PubMed ID
8690382 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amitriptyline plasma-concentration and clinical effect. A World Health Organisation Collaborative Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46805
Source
Lancet. 1978 Jan 14;1(8055):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-1978
Author
A. Coppen
K. Ghose
S. Montgomery
V A Rama Rao
J. Bailey
J. Christiansen
P L Mikkleson
H M van Praag
F. van de Poel
E J Minsker
V G Kozulja
N. Matussek
G. Kungkunz
A. Jlrgensen
Source
Lancet. 1978 Jan 14;1(8055):63-6
Date
Jan-14-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amitriptyline - administration & dosage - blood - therapeutic use
Clinical Trials
Denmark
Depression - drug therapy
Drug Evaluation
England
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Germany, West
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Nortriptyline - blood
Time Factors
USSR
World Health Organization
Abstract
54 patients in five centres participated in a study of the relationship between steady-state plasma-levels of amitriptyline (AT) and its active metabolite nortriptyline (NT) and therapeutic response. The participants were inpatients who, after a 7-12 day period of assessment, were rated greater than or equal to 16 on the Hamilton rating scale for depression. They were given 75 mg of amitriptyline for 3 days and then 150 mg daily for an active-treatment period of 6 weeks. Clinical ratings and plasma-samples were obtained at baseline then at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after starting therapy. Contrary to the findings of three previous trials, no important correlations were found between steady-state plasma-levels and therapeutic outcome or corrected side-effects. Corrected side-effects correlated negatively with therapeutic outcome. There seems little advantage in routine monitoring of AT and NT, since variations in plasma-levels do not account for the considerable variation in therapeutic outcome.
PubMed ID
74566 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of the feasibility of teaching handicapped and normal children together].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251381
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 1976 Feb-Mar;25(2):52-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V O Speck
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 1976 Feb-Mar;25(2):52-7
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Disabled Persons
Education, Special
Germany, West
Humans
Learning Disorders
Scandinavia
Social Adjustment
Teaching
PubMed ID
132654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of the risk of skin cancer from sunlight and solaria in subjects living in northern Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235096
Source
Photodermatol. 1987 Jun;4(3):118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
B L Diffey
Author Affiliation
Regional Medical Physics Department, Dryburn Hospital, Durham, UK.
Source
Photodermatol. 1987 Jun;4(3):118-26
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Child
Germany, West
Great Britain
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupations
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
The risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in northern Europeans who indulge in sunbathing or use a UVA solarium was estimated using a mathematical model of skin cancer incidence that makes allowance for childhood, occupational and recreational sun exposure. This model demonstrates that the cumulative incidence of skin cancer in indoor workers is about 2-3% by the age of 70, yet this risk can increase 5-fold if they indulge in a two-week sunbathing vacation each summer. The use of a UVA solarium is also shown to increase the risk of skin cancer. Because risk increases with the approximate square of annual solarium exposure, it is not possible to define a 'safe' level of exposure. Instead, it is shown that weekly use of a UVA solarium from age 20 until middle age (40-50) gives a relative cumulative incidence of 1.3 compared with non-users of sun beds and sun canopies. The risk begins to increase rapidly for more frequent use, particularly when solaria are used in combination with sunbathing.
PubMed ID
3684734 View in PubMed
Less detail

211 records – page 1 of 22.