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Alterations of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in gastric cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19398
Source
BMC Cancer. 2001;1:16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Huiping
S. Kristjansdottir
J G Jonasson
J. Magnusson
V. Egilsson
S. Ingvarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, National University Hospital, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. chen@rsp.is
Source
BMC Cancer. 2001;1:16
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Cadherins - genetics - physiology
Cell Adhesion - genetics - physiology
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16 - genetics
Cytoskeletal Proteins - genetics - physiology
DNA Mutational Analysis - methods
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - genetics - physiology
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics - physiology
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity - genetics
Male
Mutation, Missense - genetics - physiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Stomach Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Trans-Activators - genetics - physiology
beta Catenin
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The E-cadherin-catenin complex plays a crucial role in epithelial cell-cell adhesion and in the maintenance of tissue architecture. Perturbation in the expression or function of this complex results in loss of intercellular adhesion, with possible consequent cell transformation and tumour progression. METHODS: We studied the alterations of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in a set of 50 primary gastric tumours by using loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, gene mutation screening, detection of aberrant transcripts and immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS: A high frequency (75%) of LOH was detected at 16q22.1 containing E-cadherin locus. Three cases (6%) showed the identical missense mutation, A592T. This mutation is not likely to contribute strongly to the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer, because a low frequency (1.6%) of this mutation was also found in 187 normal individuals. We also detected a low frequency (0.36%, 0%) of this mutation in 280 breast tumours and 444 other tumours, including colon and rectum, lung, endometrium, ovary, testis, kidney, thyroid carcinomas and sarcomas, respectively. We also analyzed the aberrant E-cadherin mRNAs in the gastric tumours and found that 7 tumours (18%) had aberrant mRNAs in addition to the normal mRNA. These aberrant mRNAs may produce abnormal E-cadherin molecules, resulting in weak cell-cell adhesion and invasive behaviour of carcinoma cells. Reduced expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was identified at the frequency of 42% and 28%, respectively. Specially, 11 tumours (22%) exhibited positive cytoplasmic staining for beta-catenin IHC. An association was found between reduced expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Moreover, an association was detected between reduced expression of E-cadherin and diffuse histotype. CONCLUSION: Our results support the hypothesis that alterations of E-cadherin and beta-catenin play a role in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
11747475 View in PubMed
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Androgen receptor gene alterations in Finnish male breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186530
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2003 Jan;77(2):167-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Kirsi Syrjäkoski
Eija-R Hyytinen
Tuula Kuukasjärvi
Anssi Auvinen
Olli-P Kallioniemi
Tommi Kainu
Pasi A Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Medical Technology, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2003 Jan;77(2):167-70
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms, Male - diagnosis - genetics
Cohort Studies
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics
Receptors, Androgen - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been suggested to predispose to male breast cancer (MBC). Studies on MBC patients have not been based on the mutation screening of the entire coding region of the AR and the number of subjects has been small. Therefore, some AR gene alterations may have remained undetected. In the present study, we have comprehensively screened the entire coding region of the AR gene for mutations and also studied the role of AR CAG and GGC repeat lengths as risk factors for MBC in a cohort of 32 Finnish MBC patients. To estimate the possible involvement of the prostate cancer predisposing AR Arg726Leu germ-line mutation in MBC, this mutation was tested in 117 MBC patients. No germ-line mutations were found and the CAG and GGC repeat lengths were similar among MBC cases as among Scandinavian population. Our data indicate that the AR gene does not substantially contribute to MBC predisposition.
PubMed ID
12602915 View in PubMed
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APC mutation spectrum of Norwegian familial adenomatous polyposis families: high ratio of novel mutations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150954
Source
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2009 Oct;135(10):1463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Per Arne Andresen
Ketil Heimdal
Kristin Aaberg
Katrine Eklo
Kristin Eklo
Sarah Ariansen
Alexandra Silye
Olav Fausa
Lars Aabakken
Stefan Aretz
Tor J Eide
Tobias Gedde-Dahl
Author Affiliation
Pathology Division, University Hospital of Oslo-Rikshospitalet, N0027 Oslo, Norway. per.arne.andresen@rikshospitalet.no
Source
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2009 Oct;135(10):1463-70
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - genetics
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli - genetics
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein - genetics
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Colorectal Neoplasms - genetics
Family
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Norway
Phenotype
Abstract
Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease caused by mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Massive formation of colorectal adenomas, of which some will inevitably develop into adenocarcinomas, is the hallmark of the disease. Characterization of causative APC mutations allows presymptomatic diagnosis, close follow-up and prophylactic intervention in families. To date more than 900 different germline mutations have been characterized worldwide demonstrating allelic heterogeneity.
The germline mutation spectrum of APC identified in 69 apparently unrelated Norwegian FAP families are presented and discussed with reference to clinical phenotype and novel mutation rate.
Different methods have been used over the years. However, all mutations were confirmed detectable by an implemented denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography screening approach. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was employed for potential gross rearrangements.
Fifty-three distinctive mutations were detected, of which 22 have been detected in Norway exclusively. Except for two major deletion mutations encompassing the entire APC, all mutations resulted in premature truncation of translation caused by non-sense (31%) or change in reading frame (69%).
A high ratio of novel APC mutations continues to contribute to APC mutation heterogeneity causing FAP. This is the first comprehensive report of APC germline mutation spectrum in Norway.
Notes
Erratum In: J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2009 Oct;135(10):1471Eklo, Kristin [corrected to Eklo, Katrine]
PubMed ID
19444466 View in PubMed
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BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Russian familial breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19347
Source
Hum Mutat. 2002 Feb;19(2):184
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Irina V Tereschenko
Victoria M Basham
Bruce A J Ponder
Paul D P Pharoah
Author Affiliation
Department of Prevention, Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk Scientific Centre, Tomsk, Russia. tivru@yahoo.com
Source
Hum Mutat. 2002 Feb;19(2):184
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Codon, Nonsense - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Founder Effect
Frameshift Mutation - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Heteroduplex Analysis
Humans
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
We have screened index cases from 25 Russian breast/ovarian cancer families for germ-line mutations in all coding exons of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, using multiplex heteroduplex analysis. In addition we tested 22 patients with breast cancer diagnosed before age 40 without family history and 6 patients with bilateral breast cancer. The frequency of families with germline mutations in BRCA was 16% (4/25). One BRCA1 mutation, 5382insC, was found in three families. The results of present study, and those of a separate study of 19 breast-ovarian cancer families, suggest that BRCA1 5382insC is a founder mutation in the Russian population. Three BRCA2 mutations were found in patients with breast cancer without family history: two in young patients and one in patients with bilateral breast cancer. Four novel BRCA2 mutations were identified: three frameshift (695insT, 1528del4, 9318del4) and one nonsense (S1099X).
PubMed ID
11793480 View in PubMed
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BRCA1 wild-type allele modifies risk of ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA1 germ-line mutations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186693
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Feb;12(2):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Sophie M Ginolhac
Sophie Gad
Marilys Corbex
Brigitte Bressac-De-Paillerets
Agnès Chompret
Yves-Jean Bignon
Jean-Philippe Peyrat
Joelle Fournier
Christine Lasset
Sophie Giraud
Danièle Muller
Jean-Pierre Fricker
Agnès Hardouin
Pascaline Berthet
Christine Maugard
Catherine Nogues
Rosette Lidereau
Michel Longy
Sylviane Olschwang
Christine Toulas
Rosine Guimbaud
Drakoulis Yannoukakos
Csilla Szabo
Francine Durocher
Anne-Marie Moisan
Jacques Simard
Sylvie Mazoyer
Henry T Lynch
David Goldgar
Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet
Gilbert M Lenoir
Olga M Sinilnikova
Author Affiliation
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 5641, Lyon, France.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Feb;12(2):90-5
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alleles
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
France - epidemiology
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genes, BRCA1 - physiology
Genetic Markers - genetics
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Greece - epidemiology
Heterozygote
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Parity - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
Strong inter- and intrafamilial variation of penetrance of breast and ovarian cancer is observed in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The wild-type copy of the BRCA1 gene is a plausible candidate as a cancer risk modifier given that the residual function corresponding to the intact BRCA1 allele may influence the process of tumor formation in BRCA1 carriers. Indeed, growing evidence is now becoming available on impaired reparation of double-strand DNA breaks in cells heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations, implying an enhanced mutability of BRCA1(+/-) cells. To determine whether certain variant forms of the wild-type BRCA1 allele are implicated in variation of the BRCA1-related cancer risk, their effect was studied in a panel of 591 women with BRCA1 germ-line mutations. We found that BRCA1 carriers with the wild-type BRCA1 copy bearing a common Gly1038 variant were at increased risk of ovarian cancer (hazards ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.19). The results of our study imply that a quite significant proportion of the interindividual variability in ovarian cancer penetrance in BRCA1 carriers may be explained by a common BRCA1 Gly1038 wild-type allele, given its high frequency (0.27).
PubMed ID
12582017 View in PubMed
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Common deletion of SMAD4 in juvenile polyposis is a mutational hotspot.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190814
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2002 May;70(5):1357-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
James R Howe
Jason Shellnut
Brian Wagner
John C Ringold
Mohamed G Sayed
Abul F Ahmed
Patrick M Lynch
Christopher I Amos
Pertti Sistonen
Lauri A Aaltonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242-1086, USA. james-howe@uiowa.edu
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2002 May;70(5):1357-62
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli - epidemiology - genetics
Adult
Age of Onset
Base Sequence
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18 - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Exons - genetics
Finland
Genes, Dominant - genetics
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
Heterozygote
Humans
Iowa
Mississippi
Models, Genetic
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Sequence Deletion - genetics
Smad4 Protein
Tandem Repeat Sequences - genetics
Texas
Trans-Activators - genetics
Abstract
Juvenile polyposis (JP) is an autosomal dominant syndrome in which affected patients develop upper- and/or lower-gastrointestinal (GI) polyps. A subset of families with JP have germline mutations in the SMAD4 (MADH4) gene and are at increased risk of GI cancers. To date, six families with JP have been described as having the same SMAD4 deletion (1244-1247delAGAC). The objective of the present study is to determine whether this deletion is a common ancestral mutation or a mutational hotspot. DNA from members of four families with JP, from Iowa, Mississippi, Texas, and Finland, that had this 4-bp deletion was used to genotype 15 simple tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP) markers flanking the SMAD4 gene, including 2 new STRPs within 6.3 and 70.9 kb of the deletion. Haplotypes cosegregating with JP in each family were constructed, and the distances of the closest markers were determined from the draft sequence of the human genome. No common haplotype was observed in these four families with JP. A 14-bp region containing the deletion had four direct repeats and one inverted repeat. Because no common ancestor was suggested by haplotype analysis and the sequence flanking the deletion contains repeats frequently associated with microdeletions, this common SMAD4 deletion in JP most likely represents a mutational hotspot.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11920286 View in PubMed
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Common variants in human CRC genes as low-risk alleles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98081
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Simone Picelli
Pawel Zajac
Xiao-Lei Zhou
David Edler
Claes Lenander
Johan Dalén
Fredrik Hjern
Nils Lundqvist
Ulrik Lindforss
Lars Påhlman
Kennet Smedh
Anders Törnqvist
Jörn Holm
Martin Janson
Magnus Andersson
Susanne Ekelund
Louise Olsson
Joakim Lundeberg
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penetrance
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) has been estimated to be around 35% and yet high-penetrance germline mutations found so far explain less than 5% of all cases. Much of the remaining variations could be due to the co-inheritance of multiple low penetrant variants. The identification of all the susceptibility alleles could have public health relevance in the near future. To test the hypothesis that what are considered polymorphisms in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles, we selected eight common SNPs for a pilot association study in 1785 cases and 1722 controls. One SNP, rs3219489:G>C (MUTYH Q324H) seemed to confer an increased risk of rectal cancer in homozygous status (OR=1.52; CI=1.06-2.17). When the analysis was restricted to our 'super-controls', healthy individuals with no family history for cancer, also rs1799977:A>G (MLH1 I219V) was associated with an increased risk in both colon and rectum patients with an odds ratio of 1.28 (CI=1.02-1.60) and 1.34 (CI=1.05-1.72), respectively (under the dominant model); while 2 SNPs, rs1800932:A>G (MSH6 P92P) and rs459552:T>A (APC D1822V) seemed to confer a protective effect. The latter, in particular showed an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI=0.60-0.97) among colon patients and 0.73 (CI=0.56-0.95) among rectal patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that common variants in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles.
PubMed ID
20149637 View in PubMed
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Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analyses and review of French Canadian families with at least three cases of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141677
Source
Fam Cancer. 2010 Dec;9(4):507-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Luca Cavallone
Suzanna L Arcand
Christine M Maugard
Serge Nolet
Louis A Gaboury
Anne-Marie Mes-Masson
Parviz Ghadirian
Diane Provencher
Patricia N Tonin
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Fam Cancer. 2010 Dec;9(4):507-17
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
BRCA1 Protein - genetics
BRCA2 Protein - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Founder Effect
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk factors
Abstract
Few studies have reported on the comprehensive BRCA1/2 mutation analyses of hereditary breast cancer (HBC) families of French Canadian descent. Here we report the investigation of 82 families with at least 3 cases of breast cancer evaluated for mutations by DNA sequencing and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay. DNA sequencing identified pathogenic mutations in 37 (45.1%) families, of which 70.2% were one of three recurring mutations (BRCA1:R1443X, BRCA2:8765delAG, and BRCA2:E1953X) frequently reported in this founder population; and variants of uncertain clinical significance in 7 (8.5%) families of which two harbored BRCA2:E3002K. MLPA analysis of the 38 DNA sequence-negative families did not reveal any large rearrangements in BRCA1/2. A phenotypic characterization of the cancer families based on pathogenic mutation status revealed that there were significantly fewer very young age at diagnosis breast cancer cases (
PubMed ID
20694749 View in PubMed
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A computer model to simulate family history of breast/ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194900
Source
Math Biosci. 2001 May;171(1):99-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
C D Bajdik
J M Raboud
M T Schechter
B C McGillivray
R P Gallagher
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. cbajdik@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Math Biosci. 2001 May;171(1):99-111
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
British Columbia - epidemiology
Computer simulation
Family Health
Female
Genes, BRCA1 - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Pedigree
Abstract
The BRCA1 gene and its relationship to family history of breast/ovarian cancer are difficult to study in a population because of practical and ethical issues. The paucity of information on BRCA1 in the general population was a major theme in a recent review of genetic testing in Canada. We develop a simulation model to mimic genetic inheritance and cancer incidence in the family of someone with a germline BRCA1 mutation. Given someone's age and family structure, our model simulates his or her family history in three steps: (1) determine which family members have the mutation, (2) determine the ages of family members and (3) determine which family members have breast/ovarian cancer. Each step involves random variation. Some parameters in our model are estimated using local (British Columbia, Canada) population data. The breast/ovarian cancer risk associated with BRCA1 mutations is estimated using values published in the literature. An example is provided to illustrate the model's application. The model incorporates results from genetics, demography and epidemiology, but requires several additional assumptions. Research to address these assumptions is recommended.
PubMed ID
11325386 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.