Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256617
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Maggie Mort
Celia Roberts
Blanca Callén
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Aged
Aging - psychology
Coercion
Consumer Participation
Economic Recession
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control
Humans
Netherlands
Norway
Organizational Innovation
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Spain
Telemedicine - instrumentation - standards - utilization
Abstract
In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity.
PubMed ID
23094945 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between self-reported care needs and the allocation of care in Norwegian home nursing care recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134023
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Hans Inge Saevareid
Elin Thygesen
Torill Christine Lindstrom
Harald A Nygaard
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Arendal, Norway. hans.i.savareid@uia.no
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):20-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Community Health Nursing - methods - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Norway
Outpatients - psychology
Self Report
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the relationship between patients' self-reported illness, daily afflictions, and the frequency of home nursing care, and whether patients' coping resources influenced the allocation of care. DESIGN, SAMPLE AND MEASUREMENTS: A cross-sectional survey was adopted. Two hundred and forty-two people aged 75 years and above receiving home nursing care participated in the study. Binary logistic regression model was used to test the effects of the independent variables on home nursing care.
Poor capacity to perform activities of daily living and high level of education were directly associated with a high frequency of home nursing care. Lack of perceived social support affected the amount of home nursing care allocated only when feelings of loneliness were connected with poor activities of daily living functioning. Interaction effects revealed that perceived social support influenced the amount of home nursing care in persons with higher education, in persons with low education, no such association were found. No associations were found between coping resources and home nursing care.
Impaired capacity to perform activities of daily living was the main reason for care allocation. Education was associated with more formal care. Patients with low perceived social support combined with a low education level was a particularly vulnerable group.
PubMed ID
21631880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Participation of informal caregivers in the hospital care of elderly patients and their evaluations of the care given: pilot study in three different hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222984
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Oct;17(10):1233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
P. Laitinen
Author Affiliation
University of Kuopio, Department of Nursing Science, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Oct;17(10):1233-7
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Family - psychology
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Long-Term Care - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Respite Care - standards
Abstract
This action research is an ongoing study which will last from 1991 to 1993. The main purpose of the study is to increase the participation of informal caregivers in the hospital care of elderly patients without decreasing the quality of care. The data reported here are from a pilot study. This study had three aims: (a) to test reliability and validity of the measure used, (b) to investigate the current participation of informal caregivers in the hospital care of elderly patients (aged over 75), and (c) to evaluate and compare the quality of care from both the patients' and the informal caregivers' point of view in three different hospitals. The measure of quality of care was developed on the basis of need theories, mainly those of Maslow and Alderfer. Patients and caregivers were also asked to rate the participation of the caregivers in the hospital care of elderly patients. Participation consisted of 18 activities of daily living. The pilot test with 18 elderly hospital patients and seven family members or significant others showed differences between the two groups in perception of care received. Statistically significant differences (P
PubMed ID
1430626 View in PubMed
Less detail

A qualitative study of nursing staff members' interpretations of signs of gerotranscendence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192330
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Dec;36(5):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
B. Wadensten
M. Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Science Park, Dag Hammarskjöldsväg 10 B, S-751 83 Uppsala, Sweden. barbro.wadensten@pubcare.uu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Dec;36(5):635-42
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Empathy
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Care Services
Human Development
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Homes
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
This study was conducted in Sweden and investigated whether nursing staff working with old people could recognize signs of gerotranscendence and, if so, how they interpreted such signs. Another aim was to describe how the staff addressed and cared for older people, 65 and older, showing signs of gerotranscendence.
The theory of gerotranscendence is a theory that, present a new understanding of the ageing process. Gerotranscendence is regarded as a natural developmental process, and the term transcendence implies a shift in an older person's meta-perspective and a new outlook on reality.
Proceeding from Tornstam's description of signs of gerotranscendence, an interview guide was designed, qualitative interviews performed and the theory of gerotranscendence was used as the basis for the qualitative analysis.
Findings showed that staff working with old people noticed signs of gerotranscendence. However, their interpretations were highly variable; in some cases such signs were interpreted as what might be interpreted as "pathological". This is probably because the staff had no theoretical tools with which to make other interpretations. Some signs were interpreted as common and in some cases as "normal". These could be theoretically understood from either an activity or developmental perspective.
Staffs' need an interpretative framework allowing them to understand the signs they sometimes observe in older people. Having an interpretative framework in which these signs are seen as normal aspects of ageing would enable staff to develop a different attitude towards older people and another approach to caring for them.
PubMed ID
11737495 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Underweight and unintentional weight loss among elderly in nursing homes and in home care--problems requiring intervention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61503
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Jan 17;167(3):272-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2005

7 records – page 1 of 1.