Skip header and navigation

Refine By

106 records – page 1 of 11.

137Cs in puddle sediments as timescale tracer in urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268380
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Andrian A Seleznev
Ilia V Yarmoshenko
Alexander P Sergeev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The (137)Cs-based chronological approach is suggested to identify the age of urban landscapes and the chronology of pollution of soil in residential areas. Three main pivot points constitute the basis of the chronological approach: beginning of the Atomic Era in 1945, the maximum input in 1963 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Application of (137)Cs as a timescale tracer was tested on the example of Ekaterinburg, a city in the Middle Urals region of Russia. The sampling of recent urban sediments of micro water bodies (puddles) was carried out in 210 locations in 2007-2010. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Mn and Fe, and activity concentrations of (137)Cs were measured. It was found that the (137)Cs concentrations in the puddle sediments correlated with the age of surrounding buildings determined by the year of construction. The correlations between the concentrations of metals and (137)Cs in the puddle sediments identified the major pollutants of the urban area, assessing their background concentrations and obtaining the average annual inputs.
PubMed ID
25615884 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accumulation and distribution of 137Cs and 90Sr radionuclides in the components of water-bottom sediments-macrophytes of Lake Malye Kirpichiky].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263700
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Nov-Dec;54(6):650-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
K V Kablova
V V Deryagin
S G Levina
A A Sutyagin
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Nov-Dec;54(6):650-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Lakes
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This research work is devoted to analyzing the processes of accumulation and distribution of long-lived radionuclides of 90Sr and 137Cs in the components of water-sediment-macrophytes of Lake Malye Kirpichiky (Chelyabinsk region). The characteristic features of redistribution of radioactive substances, depending on the texture of the bottom sediments of the lake and the species composition of aquatic vegetation are shown. Also shown is the total stock of radionuclides in water and bottom sediments. The coefficients of 90Sr and 137Cs accumulation in bottom sediments and macrophytes have been calculated.
PubMed ID
25980292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of lead (Pb) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) from a lake downstream a former shooting range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279581
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Espen Mariussen
Lene Sørlie Heier
Hans Christian Teien
Marit Nandrup Pettersen
Tor Fredrik Holth
Brit Salbu
Bjørn Olav Rosseland
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antimony - analysis
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Copper - analysis
Firearms
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gills - chemistry
Kidney - chemistry
Lakes
Lead - analysis
Norway
Sports
Trout - blood - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Zygote - chemistry - drug effects
Abstract
An environmental survey was performed in Lake Kyrtj?nn, a small lake within an abandoned shooting range in the south of Norway. In Lake Kyrtj?nn the total water concentrations of Pb (14?g/L), Cu (6.1?g/L) and Sb (1.3?g/L) were elevated compared to the nearby reference Lake Stitj?nn, where the total concentrations of Pb, Cu and Sb were 0.76, 1.8 and 0.12?g/L, respectively. Brown trout (Salmo trutta) from Lake Kyrtj?nn had very high levels of Pb in bone (104mg/kg w.w.), kidney (161mg/kg w.w.) and the gills (137mg/kg d.w), and a strong inhibition of the ALA-D enzyme activity were observed in the blood (24% of control). Dry fertilized brown trout eggs were placed in the small outlet streams from Lake Kyrtj?nn and the reference lake for 6 months, and the concentrations of Pb and Cu in eggs from the Lake Kyrtj?nn stream were significantly higher than in eggs from the reference. More than 90% of Pb accumulated in the egg shell, whereas more than 80% of the Cu and Zn accumulated in the egg interior. Pb in the lake sediments was elevated in the upper 2-5cm layer (410-2700mg/kg d.w), and was predominantly associated with redox sensitive fractions (e.g., organic materials, hydroxides) indicating low potential mobility and bioavailability of the deposited Pb. Only minor amounts of Cu and Sb were deposited in the sediments. The present work showed that the adult brown trout, as well as fertilized eggs and alevins, may be subjected to increased stress due to chronic exposure to Pb, whereas exposure to Cu, Zn and Sb were of less importance.
PubMed ID
27770648 View in PubMed
Less detail

An almost completed pollution-recovery cycle reflected by sediment geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal assemblages in a Swedish-Norwegian Skagerrak fjord.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272280
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Jun 15;95(1):126-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2015
Author
Irina Polovodova Asteman
Daniela Hanslik
Kjell Nordberg
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Jun 15;95(1):126-40
Date
Jun-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aquatic Organisms
Carbon - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Foraminifera - physiology
Geologic Sediments - analysis - chemistry
Industrial Waste
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Nitrogen - analysis
Norway
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
During the 20th century Idefjord was considered one of the most polluted marine areas in Scandinavia. For decades it received high discharges from paper/pulp industry, which made it anoxic and extremely polluted by heavy metals and organic contaminants. Today the fjord is close to fulfil a complete pollution-recovery cycle, which is recorded in its sediment archives. Here we report results from five sediment cores studied for TC, C/N, heavy metals and benthic foraminifera. All of the cores have laminations deposited during 1940-1980s and indicative of long-lasting anoxia; high TC and heavy metal content, poor foraminiferal faunas and lack of macrofauna. The upper part of the cores deposited since 1980s shows a gradual pollutant decrease and partial foraminiferal recovery. The majority of foraminiferal species in Idefjord are agglutinated opportunistic and stress-tolerant taxa, which to some extent tolerate hypoxia and are early colonisers of previously disturbed environments. The current study demonstrates a value of benthic foraminiferal stratigraphy as a useful tool in understanding processes driving environmental degradation and recovery of coastal ecosystems.
PubMed ID
25931174 View in PubMed
Less detail

An experiment with forced oxygenation of the deepwater of the anoxic By Fjord, western Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266770
Source
Ambio. 2015 Feb;44(1):42-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Anders Stigebrandt
Bengt Liljebladh
Loreto de Brabandere
Michael Forth
Åke Granmo
Per Hall
Jonatan Hammar
Daniel Hansson
Mikhail Kononets
Marina Magnusson
Fredrik Norén
Lars Rahm
Alexander H Treusch
Lena Viktorsson
Source
Ambio. 2015 Feb;44(1):42-54
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics - methods
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Nitrates - analysis
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxygen - analysis
Seasons
Seawater - microbiology
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
In a 2.5-year-long environmental engineering experiment in the By Fjord, surface water was pumped into the deepwater where the frequency of deepwater renewals increased by a factor of 10. During the experiment, the deepwater became long-term oxic, and nitrate became the dominating dissolved inorganic nitrogen component. The amount of phosphate in the water column decreased by a factor of 5 due to the increase in flushing and reduction in the leakage of phosphate from the sediments when the sediment surface became oxidized. Oxygenation of the sediments did not increase the leakage of toxic metals and organic pollutants. The bacterial community was the first to show changes after the oxygenation, with aerobic bacteria also thriving in the deepwater. The earlier azoic deepwater bottom sediments were colonized by animals. No structural difference between the phytoplankton communities in the By Fjord and the adjacent Havsten Fjord, with oxygenated deepwater, could be detected during the experiment.
Notes
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 May 15;43(10):3407-1119544832
Cites: Nature. 2012 Jun 28;486(7404):463-422739295
Cites: Ambio. 2014 Feb;43(1):26-3624414802
Cites: Science. 2010 Dec 3;330(6009):1375-821071631
Cites: Ambio. 2014 Sep;43(5):634-4324114069
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1998 Jan;64(1):119-259435068
Cites: Ambio. 2007 Apr;36(2-3):280-617520945
Cites: Nature. 2009 Jan 29;457(7229):581-419078958
Cites: Science. 2008 Aug 15;321(5891):926-918703733
PubMed ID
24789509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropogenic impact on marine ecosystem health: A comparative multi-proxy investigation of recent sediments in coastal waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295677
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:328-335
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Anna Filipkowska
Ludwik Lubecki
Malgorzata Szymczak-Zyla
Tomasz M Ciesielski
Bjørn M Jenssen
Murat V Ardelan
Hanna Mazur-Marzec
Gijs D Breedveld
Amy M P Oen
Anna Zamojska
Grazyna Kowalewska
Author Affiliation
Marine Pollution Laboratory, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland. Electronic address: afilipkowska@iopan.gda.pl.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:328-335
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology - methods
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Metals - analysis
Mutagens - analysis - toxicity
Norway
Organotin Compounds - analysis
Phenols - analysis
Poland
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Hazardous substances entering the sea, and ultimately deposited in bottom sediments, pose a growing threat to marine ecosystems. The present study characterized two coastal areas exposed to significant anthropogenic impact - Gulf of Gdansk (Poland), and Oslofjord/Drammensfjord (Norway) - by conducting a multi-proxy investigation of recent sediments, and comparing the results in light of different available thresholds for selected contaminants. Sediment samples were analyzed for benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nonylphenols (NPs), organotin compounds (OTs), toxic metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), as well as mutagenic, genotoxic and endocrine-disrupting activities (in CALUX bioassays). In general, a declining trend in the deposition of contaminants was observed. Sediments from both basins were not highly contaminated with PAHs, NPs and metals, while OT levels may still give rise to concern in the Norwegian fjords. The results suggest that the contamination of sediments depends also on water/sediment conditions in a given region.
PubMed ID
30041322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Applying sediment quality guidelines on soft sediments of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272030
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Sep 15;98(1-2):314-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2015
Author
Henry Vallius
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Sep 15;98(1-2):314-9
Date
Sep-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Baltic States
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Oceans and Seas
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The Gulf of Finland is known to have been rather largely contaminated by heavy metals during the last half of the 20th century, but indications of recovery have been reported. In order to investigate the recent levels of heavy metals and arsenic in the uppermost soft sediments of the off-shore Gulf of Finland coring of altogether 23 sites were performed. The subsamples of the cores are 605 in total and thus give a good picture of heavy metal levels in the surface sediments during the first decade of this century. In order to evaluate methods and predict sediment toxicity the sediment concentrations are compared to American SQG:s. Majority of the subsamples exceeded the threshold levels of both used SQG:s, but some exceeded also the midrange effects quality guidelines. As, Cd, Hg, and Zn concentrations still occur at unacceptably high levels in sediments of the off-shore Gulf of Finland.
PubMed ID
26111654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are methylmercury concentrations in the wetlands of Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia, Canada, dependent on geology?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182394
Source
J Environ Qual. 2003 Nov-Dec;32(6):2085-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steven D Siciliano
Al Sangster
Chris J Daughney
Lisa Loseto
James J Germida
Andrew N Rencz
Nelson J O'Driscoll
David R S Lean
Author Affiliation
Dep. of Soil Science, Univ. of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5A8. Siciliano@sask.usask.ca
Source
J Environ Qual. 2003 Nov-Dec;32(6):2085-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - metabolism
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Methylmercury compounds - analysis
Nova Scotia
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
In the relatively pristine ecosystem in Kejimkujik Park, Nova Scotia, methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in loons, Gavia immer, are among the highest recorded anywhere in the world. This study investigated the influence of bedrock lithology on MeHg concentrations in wetlands. Twenty-five different wetland field sites were sampled over four different bedrock lithologies; Kejimkujik monzogranite, black sulfidic slate, gray slate, and greywacke. Soil samples were analyzed for ethylmercury (EtHg), MeHg, total Hg, acid-volatile sulfides (AVS), organic matter, and water content as well as the biological parameters, mercury methyltransferase (HgMT) activity, sulfate reduction rates, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition, and acidity. Methylmercury concentrations in the wetlands were highly dependent (P
PubMed ID
14674530 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arsenic mobility and characterization in lakes impacted by gold ore roasting, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292468
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Martin D Van Den Berghe
Heather E Jamieson
Michael J Palmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University, 36 Union St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, 3651 Trousdale Pkwy, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. Electronic address: mdvanden@usc.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenicals - analysis
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gold
Lakes - analysis
Mining
Oxides - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The controls on the mobility and fate of arsenic in lakes impacted by historical gold ore roasting in northern Canada have been examined. A detailed characterization of arsenic solid and aqueous phases in lake waters, lake sediments and sediment porewaters as well as surrounding soils was conducted in three small lakes (80 wt%) of arsenic is contained in the form of secondary sulphide precipitates, with iron oxy-hydroxides hosting a minimal amount of arsenic (
PubMed ID
29223820 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atmospheric deposition of V, Cr, and Ni since the late glacial: effects of climatic cycles, human impacts, and comparison with crustal abundances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95899
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2003 Jun 15;37(12):2658-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2003
Author
Krachler Michael
Mohl Carola
Emons Hendrik
Shotyk William
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Geochemistry, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 236, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. krachler@ugc.uni-heidelberg.de
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2003 Jun 15;37(12):2658-67
Date
Jun-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Atmosphere - analysis
Chromium - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Ice - analysis
Lead
Nickel - analysis
Scandium
Soil - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Stainless Steel
Time Factors
Vanadium - analysis
Abstract
Vanadium, Cr, and Ni accumulating in a Swiss peat bog since 12 370 14C yr B.P. have been measured using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid dissolution in a microwave autoclave. Strict quality control schemes were applied to guarantee the accuracy of the applied analytical methodology. The concentration gradients in the peat column and comparison with Pb indicate that V, Cr, and Ni are effectively immobile in the ombrotrophic section of the peat profile but that Ni is added to the minerotrophic peat layers by chemical weathering of the underlying sediments. The lowest metal concentrations were found during the Holocene climate optimum (5320-8230 14C yr B.P.) when "natural background" values averaged 0.55 +/- 0.13 microg g(-1) V, 0.76 +/- 0.17 microg g(-1) Cr, and 0.46 +/- 0.09 microg g(-1) Ni (n = 18); given the average bulk density (0.05 g/cm3) and accumulation rate (0.05 cm/ yr) of peat in this zone, the corresponding atmospheric fluxes are approximately 14, 19, and 12 microg m(-2) yr(-1) for V, Cr, and Ni, respectively. The highest concentrations of V, Cr, and Ni were found during the Younger Dryas cold climate event (centered at 10 590 14C yr B.P.) when background values were exceeded by about 40 times. Elevated concentrations and accumulation rates were also found at 8230 and 5320 14C yr B.P., which are consistent with the elevated dust fluxes recorded by Greenland ice cores. By far the greatest contribution of the three elements to the peat inventory is atmospheric soil dust, and the metal fluxes vary not only with climate change but also land-use history (especially the beginning of forest clearing for agriculture ca. 6 millennia ago). The V/Sc, Cr/Sc, and Ni/ Sc ratios were remarkably similar to their corresponding ratios in the earth's crust until the onset of the Industrial Revolution (240 14C yr B.P.), which largely validates the use of crustal concentrations for calculating enrichment factors (EF) for these elements. In modern samples, the EFs of V, Cr, and Ni reach maximum values between 2.4 and 4.1, relative to background; anthropogenic emissions are a more likely explanation of the elevated EFs than either plant uptake or chemical diagenesis. This study demonstrates the usefulness of peat bogs as archives of atmospheric metal deposition and underpins the potential of peat cores to help distinguish between lithogenic and anthropogenic metal sources.
PubMed ID
12854702 View in PubMed
Less detail

106 records – page 1 of 11.