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1233 records – page 1 of 124.

Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 93(25):1322-1323.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1965
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 93(25):1322-1323.
Date
1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Medical geography
Health status
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 46.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 429.
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Prospects for geochemical-geomedical research in northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232392
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1988 Oct;47(4):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
R. Piispanen
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1988 Oct;47(4):166-72
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiology
Finland
Geography
Humans
Research
PubMed ID
3214506 View in PubMed
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On the arid margin: the relationship between climate, humans and the environment. A review of evidence from the highlands of central Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217414
Source
Chemosphere. 1994 Sep;29(5):965-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
S L O'Hara
S E Metcalfe
F A Street-Perrott
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Sheffield University, U.K.
Source
Chemosphere. 1994 Sep;29(5):965-81
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Ecology
Environment
Geography
Humans
Mexico
Abstract
There has long been speculation as to the relationship between climate, humans and the environment. Until recently, however, it has proved difficult to establish the degree to which these factors are interlinked. Here we draw on evidence that has recently emerged from a series of investigations in central México to evaluate the long-term human impact on the environment and to establish the impact that late Holocene changes in the climate have had on the indigenous populations that lived on the arid frontier of Mesoamerica. Data from these studies indicate that: 1) the indigenous peoples of central México had a significant and often detrimental impact on the landscape, causing widespread land degradation; 2) The onset of anthropogenic accelerated erosion coincided with the introduction of sedentary agriculture in this region; 3) Fluctuations in the climate of central México over the last 4,000 years have had a significant impact on the subsistence strategies of the population which extended its territory into the northern arid lands during wetter periods, but rapidly abandoned these areas when the climate became drier.
PubMed ID
7953466 View in PubMed
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A high-latitude fauna of mid-Mesozoic mammals from Yakutia, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297481
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0199983
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Alexander Averianov
Thomas Martin
Alexey Lopatin
Pavel Skutschas
Rico Schellhorn
Petr Kolosov
Dmitry Vitenko
Author Affiliation
Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0199983
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Archaeology
Geography
Mammals
Russia
Tooth
Abstract
The Early Cretaceous (?Berriasian-Barremian) Teete vertebrate locality in Western Yakutia, East Siberia, Russia, has produced mammal remains that are attributed to three taxa: Eleutherodontidae indet. cf. Sineleutherus sp. (Haramiyida; an upper molariform tooth), Khorotherium yakutensis gen. et sp. nov. (Tegotheriidae, Docodonta; maxillary fragment with three molariform teeth and dentary fragment with one molariform tooth), and Sangarotherium aquilonium gen. et sp. nov. (Eutriconodonta incertae sedis; dentary fragment with one erupted molariform tooth and one tooth in crypt). This is the second occurrence of Mesozoic mammals in high latitudes (paleolatitude estimate N 63-70°) of the Northern Hemisphere. In spite of the presumed Early Cretaceous age based on freshwater mollusks, the Teete mammal assemblage has a distinctive Jurassic appearance, being most similar to the Middle-Late Jurassic mammal assemblages known from Siberia, Russia and Xinjiang, China. The smooth transition from Jurassic to Cretaceous biota in Northern Asia is best explained by stable environmental conditions.
PubMed ID
30044817 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiology of tularemia in the Arkhangel district].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109789
Source
Tr Leningr Nauchnoissled Inst Epidemiol Mikrobiol. 1970;37:247-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
V I Sosnitskii
Source
Tr Leningr Nauchnoissled Inst Epidemiol Mikrobiol. 1970;37:247-58
Date
1970
Language
Russian
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Geography
Humans
Russia
Seasons
Tularemia - epidemiology
PubMed ID
4255064 View in PubMed
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The geographic incidence and future growth pattern of the elderly population in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243386
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1982 Mar;29(3):93-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
P C Matthiessen
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1982 Mar;29(3):93-5
Date
Mar-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Forecasting
Geography
Humans
Population Growth
PubMed ID
7075266 View in PubMed
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[Morbidity with temporary loss of work capacity in relation to the natural and climatic conditions in the region of the construction of the eastern portion of the Baikal-Amur mainline].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249022
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1978;(10):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
V N Zavgorud'ko
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1978;(10):12-4
Date
1978
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Climate
Geography
Humans
Morbidity
Railroads
Seasons
Siberia
PubMed ID
706849 View in PubMed
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[Arctic regions and their populations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231599
Source
Duodecim. 1989;105(5):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A. Naukkarinen
Source
Duodecim. 1989;105(5):399-405
Date
1989
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Geography
Humans
Population Density
Social Conditions
PubMed ID
2721398 View in PubMed
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Source
Sci Am. 2013 Nov;309(5):16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Arielle Duhaime-Ross
Source
Sci Am. 2013 Nov;309(5):16
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Geographic Mapping
Geography
Humans
PubMed ID
24283006 View in PubMed
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Bioavailable soil phosphorus decreases with increasing elevation in a subarctic tundra landscape.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268853
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e92942
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Andrea G Vincent
Maja K Sundqvist
David A Wardle
Reiner Giesler
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e92942
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Geography
Phosphorus - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Sweden
Tundra
Abstract
Phosphorus (P) is an important macronutrient in arctic and subarctic tundra and its bioavailability is regulated by the mineralization of organic P. Temperature is likely to be an important control on P bioavailability, although effects may differ across contrasting plant communities with different soil properties. We used an elevational gradient in northern Sweden that included both heath and meadow vegetation types at all elevations to study the effects of temperature, soil P sorption capacity and oxalate-extractable aluminium (Alox) and iron (Feox) on the concentration of different soil P fractions. We hypothesized that the concentration of labile P fractions would decrease with increasing elevation (and thus declining temperature), but would be lower in meadow than in heath, given that N to P ratios in meadow foliage are higher. As expected, labile P in the form of Resin-P declined sharply with elevation for both vegetation types. Meadow soils did not have lower concentrations of Resin-P than heath soils, but they did have 2-fold and 1.5-fold higher concentrations of NaOH-extractable organic P and Residual P, respectively. Further, meadow soils had 3-fold higher concentrations of Alox + Feox and a 20% higher P sorption index than did heath soils. Additionally, Resin-P expressed as a proportion of total soil P for the meadow was on average half that in the heath. Declining Resin-P concentrations with elevation were best explained by an associated 2.5-3.0 °C decline in temperature. In contrast, the lower P availability in meadow relative to heath soils may be associated with impaired organic P mineralization, as indicated by a higher accumulation of organic P and P sorption capacity. Our results indicate that predicted temperature increases in the arctic over the next century may influence P availability and biogeochemistry, with consequences for key ecosystem processes limited by P, such as primary productivity.
Notes
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2005 Oct 22;272(1577):2105-1516191623
Cites: Oecologia. 2003 May;135(4):487-9912695899
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2007 Nov;22(11):569-7417988759
Cites: Ecology. 2009 Feb;90(2):441-5119323228
Cites: Oecologia. 2009 Aug;161(1):113-2319452173
Cites: Ecology. 2010 Mar;91(3):767-8120426335
Cites: New Phytol. 2011 Mar;189(4):967-7721077887
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e2705622046443
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Apr 3;46(7):3950-622394413
Cites: New Phytol. 2013 Feb;197(3):1002-1123206238
PubMed ID
24676035 View in PubMed
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1233 records – page 1 of 124.