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3801 records – page 1 of 381.

Gm phenotypes and genotypes in U.S. whites and Negroes; in American Indians and Eskimos; in Africans; and in Micronesians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2404
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 13(1):205-213.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1961
Author
Steinberg, A.G.
Author Affiliation
Western Reserve University
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 13(1):205-213.
Date
1961
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Wainwright
Gm genotype
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1374.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 1150.
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Inheritance of blood groups antigens in a largely Eskimo population sample. [Letter]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1487
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 18(2):231.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966
Author
Lewis, M.
Chown, B.
Kaita, H.
Author Affiliation
Rh Laboratory (Winnipeg)
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 18(2):231.
Date
1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Blood groups, MN
Gc genotype
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1311.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 343.
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Studies on the 'Group Specific Component' of human serum. Gene frequencies in several populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature527
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 13:372-378.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1961
Author
Cleve, H.
Bearn, A.G.
Author Affiliation
Rockefeller Institute
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 13:372-378.
Date
1961
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Immunoelectrophoresis
Gc genotype
Protein, serum
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1328.
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Immunoelectrophoresis of the group-specific proteins in Alaskan Indians and Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature716
Source
Pages 42-45 in E.G. Viereck, ed. Science in Alaska 1966. Proceedings, Alaskan Science Conference, 17th, Anchorage, AK, August 29-September 1, 1966.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1967
Author
Duncan, I.W.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Pages 42-45 in E.G. Viereck, ed. Science in Alaska 1966. Proceedings, Alaskan Science Conference, 17th, Anchorage, AK, August 29-September 1, 1966.
Date
1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Protein, serum
Gc genotype
Immunoelectrophoresis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1338.
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Genetic polymorphism of CYP1A1 and CYP2D6 in the tundra Nentsi population of Siberia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2943
Source
Pages 725-729 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
, Novosibirsk, Russia 2 Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: The purpose of this study was to establish the frequencies of CYPIA I and CYP2D6 polymor- phic genotypes in the Tundra Nentsi population, which is a small indigenous northern people living in Siberia and belonging to
  1 document  
Author
Lyakhovich, V.V.
Mitrofanov, D.V.
Gutkina, N.I.
Duzhak, T.G.
Posukh, O.L.
Osipova, L.P.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Molecular Pathology and Ecological Biochemistry, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 725-729 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Genetics
Indigenous peoples
Polymorphic genotypes
Russia
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to establish the frequencies of CYP1A1 and CYP2D6 polymorphic genotypes in the Tundra Nentsi population, which is a small indigenous northern people living in Siberia and belonging to the Northern Mongoloid race. The frequencies of Ile/Ile, Ile/Val, and Val/Val genotypes in the Tundra Nentsi population, as determined by means of the allele-specific PCR, were 50.8%, 39.2%, and 10%, respectively. Thus, the Val allele frequency in Tundra Nentsi appeared to be as high (29.5%) as in the Japanese population (25%) reported elsewhere. Those frequencies in the reference group of Siberian Caucasians were in good agreement with the data reported elsewhere for other Caucasians, although the Val allele frequency observed in Siberia inhabitants (5.7%) was somewhat higher than those frequencies obtained for other Caucasian populations. By means of PCR followed by specific-site digestion with MvaI endonuclease, we analysed the frequencies of CYP2D6B allele in the Tundra Nentsi population. The frequencies of 2D6wt/2D6wt and 2D6wt/B in the group of 120 Nentsi were 84.2% and 15.8%, respectively, with no subject possessing the 2D6B/2D6B genotype. The group of Siberian Caucasians represented those frequencies as 67.7%, 27.1%, and 5.2%, respectively. In total, the frequency of CYP2D6B allele in the Tundra Nentsi population was half that in Caucasians (8.3% vs. 19%). Taken together, our data indicate that the frequencies of CYP2D6B and Val allele of CYP1A1 in Tundra Nentsi population are different from those obtained for Caucasians. We also found similarities in the CYP1A1 mutation frequencies in the Tundra Nentsi and Japanese populations.
Documents
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Viral hepatitis in the Arctic. A review from a circumpolar workshop on viral hepatitis, ICCH13.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84156
Source
Pages 193-203 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):193-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
higher among indigenous populations than in the general public. However, due to differences in the available information from each of the four Arctic countries, it is difficult to compare differences in types of disease in them. The main areas for future research are: HBV genotypes distribution
  1 document  
Author
Tulisov, A
McMahon, BJ
Koch, A
Minuk, G
Chulanov, V
Bruce, MG
Uhanova, J
Børresen, M
Williams, J
Osiowy, C
Gelvan, A
Alexeeva, M
Larke, B
Watt, K
Author Affiliation
Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia
Source
Pages 193-203 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):193-203
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Genotypes
Indigenous population
Viral hepatitis
Abstract
This article is a review of the viral hepatitis workshop, held during the 13th International Congress of the Circumpolar Health consists of a review of data on viral hepatitis in the Arctic territories of four countries: Canada, Greenland, Russia and United States (Alaska). The main purpose of the workshop was to exchange knowledge on viral hepatitis in the Arctic and identify further needs for collaborative hepatitis research, which is planned to be implemented through the established Viral Hepatitis Working Group in the Arctic. The review is based on the available published research results, surveillance data and professional opinions of the authors. The information is presented by Arctic country. Viral hepatitis constitutes an important problem among Aboriginal peoples of the Arctic; the incidence of most types of viral hepatitis is higher among indigenous populations than in the general public. However, due to differences in the available information from each of the four Arctic countries, it is difficult to compare differences in types of disease in them. The main areas for future research are: HBV genotypes distribution, relations between different types of HBV, HCV and disease outcomes, HBV mutation rate and specific substitutions in the HBV genome over time in the Arctic, and occurrence of active liver disease in HBsAg carriers living in the Arctic, as well as further research in viral hepatitis A, C, D and E.
PubMed ID
17929632 View in PubMed
Documents
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Serum albumin polymorphism and American Indian anthropology. [Abstract]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature320
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 29(1):129.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
Blumberg, B.S.
Melmartin, L.
Author Affiliation
Institute for Cancer Research (Philadelphia)
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 29(1):129.
Date
1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Naskapi albumin
Genetic variations
Gc genotype
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1322.
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Molecular epidemiology of viral hepatitis B, C, and D in the Chukot region

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256663
Source
Page 90 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
, Moscow, Russia, 2 Chukot Regional Hospital, Anadyr, Russia Introduction: Genotypes of hepatitis viruses Band D can be clinically and epidemiologically relevant. We studied prevalence of genotypes of these viruses in the Chukot region. Materials and Methods: Serum samples from 124 chronic hepatitis
  1 document  
Author
Karandashova IV
Neverov AD
Fast EV
Dolgin VA
Braslavskaya SI
Chulanov VP
Author Affiliation
Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North (Raipon)
Central Research Institute of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russia,
Chukot Regional Hospital, Anadyr, Russia
Source
Page 90 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Russia
Genotype D
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 2. Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health.
Documents
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Probability of paternity exclusion in different mother-child genotype combinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244985
Source
Hereditas. 1981;94(1):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
N. Ryman
A. Hansson
J. Hirschfeld
T. Swan
Source
Hereditas. 1981;94(1):99-104
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Paternity
Probability
Sweden
PubMed ID
7216828 View in PubMed
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Competitiveness of endophytic Phialocephala fortinii s.l. - Acephala applanata strains in Norway spruce roots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298081
Source
Fungal Biol. 2018 05; 122(5):345-352
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Sophie Stroheker
Vivanne Dubach
Thomas N Sieber
Author Affiliation
ETH Zurich, Institute of Integrative Biology, Forest Pathology and Dendrology, Universitätstrasse 16, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: sophie.stroheker@alumni.ethz.ch.
Source
Fungal Biol. 2018 05; 122(5):345-352
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ascomycota - classification - genetics - physiology
Endophytes - classification - genetics - physiology
Genotype
Genotyping Techniques
Microbial Interactions
Microsatellite Repeats
Mycological Typing Techniques
Norway
Picea - microbiology
Plant Roots - microbiology
Abstract
Dark septate endophytes of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. - Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) are presumed to be the most abundant root colonizing endophytes of conifers across the Northern hemisphere. To test the competitiveness of different PAC strains, PAC-free Picea abies saplings were inoculated with five different PAC strains by planting them in pre-colonized substrates. Saplings were left to grow for six weeks and then transplanted crosswise into a substrate colonized by one of the other four strains for a further two weeks. PAC were isolated and genotyped using microsatellite markers. The power of colonization, i.e. the ability of colonizing roots already colonized by another PAC strain, and the power of retention, i.e. the ability of a resident strain of not being suppressed by an invading PAC strain, were calculated for each strain in every combination. The experiment was run twice under two different climatic conditions. Our results show that PAC strains differ (1) in their ability to colonize PAC-free, non-sterile roots, (2) in resistance against being suppressed by another PAC strain and (3) in their ability to invade roots already colonized by another PAC strain. In addition, both the PAC-PAC and the PAC-host interactions depend on the climatic conditions.
PubMed ID
29665960 View in PubMed
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3801 records – page 1 of 381.