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The 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus is not linked to calcium stone formation or calciuric phenotypes in French-Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206213
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
P. Scott
D. Ouimet
Y. Proulx
M L Trouvé
G. Guay
B. Gagnon
L. Valiquette
A. Bonnardeaux
Author Affiliation
Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Calcium - urine
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Kidney Calculi - enzymology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Pedigree
Phenotype
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Calcium urolithiasis is often associated with increased intestinal absorption and urine excretion of calcium, and has been suggested to result from increased vitamin D production. The role of the enzyme 1 alpha-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting step in active vitamin D production, was evaluated in 36 families, including 28 sibships with at least a pair of affected sibs, using qualitative and quantitative trait linkage analyses. Sibs with a verified calcium urolithiasis passage (n = 117) had higher 24-h calciuria (P = 0.03), oxaluria (P = 0.02), fasting and postcalcium loading urine calcium/creatinine (Ca/cr) ratios (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002, respectively), and serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels (P = 0.02) compared with nonstone-forming sibs (n = 120). Markers from a 9-centiMorgan interval encompassing the VDD1 locus on chromosome 12q13-14 (putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase) were analyzed in 28 sibships (146 sib pairs) of single and recurrent stone formers and in 14 sibships (65 sib pairs) with recurrent-only (> or = 3 episodes) stone-forming sibs. Two-point and multipoint analyses did not reveal excess in alleles shared among affected sibs at the VDD1 locus. Linkage of stone formation to the VDD1 locus could be excluded, respectively, with a lambda d of 2.0 (single and recurrent stone formers) and 3.25 (recurrent stone formers). Quantitative trait analyses revealed no evidence for linkage to 24-h calciuria and oxaluria, serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels, and Ca/cr ratios. This study shows absence of linkage of the putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus to calcium stone formation or to quantitative traits associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria. In addition, there is coaggregation of calciuric and oxaluric phenotypes with stone formation.
PubMed ID
9513904 View in PubMed
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The -1C to T polymorphism in the annexin A5 gene is not associated with the risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death in middle-aged Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53135
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
K S Kaikkonen
S. Kakko
M L Kortelainen
J M Tapanainen
M J Savolainen
Y. Antero Kesäniemi
H V Huikuri
E R Savolainen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5' Untranslated Regions - genetics
Adult
Aged
Annexin A5 - genetics
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A common polymorphism (-1C to T) in the translation initiation sequence of annexin A5 (ANV) gene has recently been associated with a decreased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the present study was to analyze the association between the ANV genepolymorphism and the risk of AMI and ischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged Finnish males. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study involving three distinct groups of subjects was carried out: (1) victims of SCD (n=98), (2) survivors of AMI (n=212), and (3) randomly selected control subjects without any history of coronary heart disease (n=243). The ANV polymorphism was genotyped in each study group. RESULTS: Among the control group of healthy Finnish males the prevalence rates of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 83.1%, 15.2%, and 1.6%, respectively. Among the survivors of AMI, the prevalence rates of CC, CT, and TT were 79.7%, 20.3%, and 0%, respectively, and among the victims of SCD 83.7%, 16.3%, and 0%, respectively. No significant differences in the genotype or allele distributions were observed between the study groups. CONCLUSION: The -1C to T polymorphism in the ANV gene is not associated with the risk of AMI or SCD in middle-aged Finnish males.
PubMed ID
16025836 View in PubMed
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The -112G>A polymorphism of the secretoglobin 3A2 (SCGB3A2) gene encoding uteroglobin-related protein 1 (UGRP1) increases risk for the development of Graves' disease in subsets of patients with elevated levels of immunoglobulin E.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138513
Source
J Appl Genet. 2011 May;52(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Dimitry A Chistiakov
Natalia V Voronova
Rust I Turakulov
Kirill V Savost'anov
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, 1st Dorozhny Proezd 1, 117545, Moscow, Russia. dimitry.chistiakov@lycos.com
Source
J Appl Genet. 2011 May;52(2):201-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Graves Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Hypersensitivity - genetics
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Russia - epidemiology
Secretoglobins
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Uteroglobin - blood - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The human secretoglobin 3A2 (SCGB3A2) gene encoding secretory uteroglobin-related protein 1 (UGRP1) resides on the chromosome region 5q31-33 that harbors a susceptibility locus to several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including asthma and Graves' disease (GD). Recently, association between the marker rs1368408 (-112G?>A), located in the promoter region of the SCGB3A2 gene, and susceptibility to GD was found in Chinese and UK Caucasians. The study aim was to evaluate whether this polymorphism confers GD susceptibility in a large population cohort comprising 1,474 Russian GD patients and 1,619 controls. The marker rs1368408 was studied using a TaqMan allele discrimination assay. Serum levels of UGRP1 and immunoglobulin E (IgE) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses. Association between the allele A of SCGB3A2 and a higher risk of GD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.33, P = 2.9 × 10(-5)) was shown. Both affected and non-affected carriers of the higher risk genotype A/A had significantly decreased levels of serum UGRP1 compared to the subjects homozygous for G/G (93 ± 37 pg/ml vs. 132 ± 45 pg/ml, P = 0.0011 for GD patients; 77 ± 28 pg/ml vs. 119 ± 33 pg/ml, P = 0.0019 for controls). Serum IgE levels were significantly higher in non-affected subjects homozygous for A/A compared to control individuals homozygous for G/G (153 ± 46 IU/ml vs. 122 ± 40 IU/ml, P = 0.0095). Our data suggest that the carriage of the SCGB3A2 -112A/A variant increases the risk for GD in subsets of patients with elevated levels of IgE, a hallmark of allergic asthma. Therefore, the SCGB3A2 -112G?>A polymorphism may be considered as a likely marker linking susceptibility to allergy/asthma and GD on chromosome 5q31-33.
PubMed ID
21170691 View in PubMed
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Absence of linkage of phonological coding dyslexia to chromosome 6p23-p21.3 in a large family data set.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204108
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Nov;63(5):1448-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
L L Field
B J Kaplan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgry, Alberta, Canada. field@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Nov;63(5):1448-56
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Alberta
Alleles
Auditory Perception
Child
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
Dyslexia - genetics - physiopathology
Europe - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genetic Linkage
Genetic markers
Genotype
Humans
Lod Score
Nuclear Family
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that a locus predisposing to specific reading disability (dyslexia) resides on chromosome 6p23-p21.3. We investigated 79 families having at least two siblings affected with phonological coding dyslexia, the most common form of reading disability (617 people genotyped, 294 affected), and we tested for linkage with the genetic markers reported to be linked to dyslexia in those studies. No evidence for linkage was found by LOD score analysis or affected-sib-pair methods. However, using the affected-pedigree-member (APM) method, we detected significant evidence for linkage and/or association with some markers when we used published allele frequencies with weighting of rarer alleles. APM results were not significant when we used marker allele frequencies estimated from parents. Furthermore, results were not significant with the more robust SIMIBD method using either published or parental marker frequencies. Finally, family-based association analysis using the AFBAC program showed no evidence for association with any marker. We conclude that the APM method should be used only with extreme caution, because it appears to have generated false-positive results. In summary, using a large data set with high power to detect linkage, we were unable to find evidence for linkage or association between phonological coding dyslexia and chromosome 6p markers.
Notes
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Erratum In: Am J Hum Genet 1999 Jan;64(1):334
PubMed ID
9792873 View in PubMed
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Absence of the Asian-specific region V mitochondrial marker in Native Beringians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224068
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
G F Shields
K. Hecker
M I Voevoda
J K Reed
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Asia, Central - ethnology
Base Sequence
Chromosome Deletion
DNA Probes - diagnostic use
DNA, Mitochondrial - analysis - genetics
Far East - ethnology
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
The Asian-specific 9-bp deletion between the genes for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II and lysine transfer RNA has been used to trace aboriginal human movements out of Southeast Asia and into portions of the South Pacific. Although it has been used to estimate the number of independent lineages that occur in the New World, it has not been studied in native peoples of the Beringian region. Thus, we have used PCR to amplify and compare the lengths of DNA segments surrounding this deletion in native peoples of Beringia and the adjacent regions, as well as natives of the Altai Mountains of Southwestern Siberia. Of the 176 individuals analyzed here, the deletion was found in only 3 of 25 individuals from the Ust-Kan region of the Altai Mountains. We comment on the distribution of this marker and on potential relationships between Beringians and other Native American groups in which this marker has been surveyed. One Chukchi possessed three copies of the 9-bp sequence, which suggests (1) that the number of copies of this sequence in humans may be more variable than had been believed and (2) that a mechanism of replication based on tandem duplication may be a potential explanation for the origin of this length mutation in humans.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1550120 View in PubMed
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[Acceptability of using Karachay surnames as a quasigenetic marker in population and genetic studies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261292
Source
Genetika. 2014 Jul;50(7):874-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
G I El'chinova
A V Ivanov
L A El'kanova
Yu A Revazova
R A Zinchenko
Source
Genetika. 2014 Jul;50(7):874-7
Date
Jul-2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genetic markers
Genetics, Population - methods - standards
Humans
Names
Population - genetics
Registries
Russia
Abstract
Based on a comparison of the data on the frequencies of 1206 surnames registered in the Malokarachayevsky District of Karachay-Cherkessia with a number of other parameters and historical data, it was concluded that Karachay surnames are acceptable for use as a quasigenetic marker in a study of a population-genetic description of the area.
PubMed ID
25720146 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of genomic selection for growth and wood quality traits in two control-pollinated progeny trials using exome capture as the genotyping platform in Norway spruce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299456
Source
BMC Genomics. 2018 Dec 18; 19(1):946
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-18-2018
Author
Zhi-Qiang Chen
John Baison
Jin Pan
Bo Karlsson
Bengt Andersson
Johan Westin
María Rosario García-Gil
Harry X Wu
Author Affiliation
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-90183, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
BMC Genomics. 2018 Dec 18; 19(1):946
Date
Dec-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Exome
Genetic markers
Genomics - methods
Genotype
Models, Genetic
Models, Statistical
Norway
Phenotype
Picea - genetics - growth & development
Plant Breeding
Pollination
Selection, Genetic
Wood - chemistry - genetics
Abstract
Genomic selection (GS) can increase genetic gain by reducing the length of breeding cycle in forest trees. Here we genotyped 1370 control-pollinated progeny trees from 128 full-sib families in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), using exome capture as genotyping platform. We used 116,765 high-quality SNPs to develop genomic prediction models for tree height and wood quality traits. We assessed the impact of different genomic prediction methods, genotype-by-environment interaction (G?×?E), genetic composition, size of the training and validation set, relatedness, and number of SNPs on accuracy and predictive ability (PA) of GS.
Using G matrix slightly altered heritability estimates relative to pedigree-based method. GS accuracies were about 11-14% lower than those based on pedigree-based selection. The efficiency of GS per year varied from 1.71 to 1.78, compared to that of the pedigree-based model if breeding cycle length was halved using GS. Height GS accuracy decreased to more than 30% while using one site as training for GS prediction and using this model to predict the second site, indicating that G?×?E for tree height should be accommodated in model fitting. Using a half-sib family structure instead of full-sib structure led to a significant reduction in GS accuracy and PA. The full-sib family structure needed only 750 markers to reach similar accuracy and PA, as compared to 100,000 markers required for the half-sib family, indicating that maintaining the high relatedness in the model improves accuracy and PA. Using 4000-8000 markers in full-sib family structure was sufficient to obtain GS model accuracy and PA for tree height and wood quality traits, almost equivalent to that obtained with all markers.
The study indicates that GS would be efficient in reducing generation time of breeding cycle in conifer tree breeding program that requires long-term progeny testing. The sufficient number of trees within-family (16 for growth and 12 for wood quality traits) and number of SNPs (8000) are required for GS with full-sib family relationship. GS methods had little impact on GS efficiency for growth and wood quality traits. GS model should incorporate G?×?E effect when a strong G?×?E is detected.
PubMed ID
30563448 View in PubMed
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Additional factor in some HLA DR3/DQ2 haplotypes confers a fourfold increased genetic risk of celiac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185329
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2003 Apr;61(4):308-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
E. Bolognesi
K. Karell
S. Percopo
I. Coto
L. Greco
V. Mantovani
E. Suoraniemi
J. Partanen
K. Mustalahti
M. Mäki
P. Momigliano-Richiardi
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Eastern Piedmont University and I.R.C.A.D. (Interdisciplinary Research Center on Autoimmune Diseases), Novara, Italy. bolognes@med.unipmn.it
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2003 Apr;61(4):308-16
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Celiac Disease - genetics
Finland
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR3 Antigen - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Italy
Abstract
Although HLA-DQ genes are the major celiac disease (CD) susceptibility genes, results from Finnish families suggest that not all DQ2-encoding haplotypes confer equal susceptibility to CD, implying the effect of other gene(s) in the HLA region. The aim of the present work was to extend and confirm the aforementioned results in a southern European population ( Italian) and to better localize the additional risk factor/s. The association of nine loci spanning the HLA region from DR to HFE, 4.5-Mb telomeric of HLA-A, was tested. The analysis was performed by comparing marker frequencies in DR3-DQ2 haplotypes transmitted and non-transmitted to the affected offspring in 156 Italian CD families selected for having at least one DR3-positive parent. The same analysis was performed independently in 101 Finnish CD families selected with the same criteria. Three alleles, MICA-A5.1, MICB-CA24 and MIB-350, all characteristic of the B8-DR3 extended haplotype, showed a significantly increased frequency in DR3 transmitted haplotypes in the Italian families. DR3 haplotypes carrying the combination of these alleles conferred an approximate fourfold increased CD risk. B8-DR3 transmitted haplotypes were significantly more conserved telomerically down to the MIC-Class I region. Similar results were seen in the Finnish families. The major conclusion that holds true in both populations is that, while DQ2 is an absolute requirement for the development of CD, the presence of an additional genetic factor within the MIC-Class I region confers an approximate 4-fold increased risk of the disease.
PubMed ID
12753669 View in PubMed
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Adult-onset autosomal recessive ataxia with thalamic lesions in a Finnish family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193155
Source
Neurology. 2001 Sep 25;57(6):1043-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2001
Author
M. Rantamäki
R. Krahe
A. Paetau
B. Cormand
I. Mononen
B. Udd
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland. maria.rantamaki@pp.fimnet.fi
Source
Neurology. 2001 Sep 25;57(6):1043-9
Date
Sep-25-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Stem - pathology
Cerebellum - pathology
Chromosome Aberrations - genetics
Chromosome Disorders
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Finland
Genes, Recessive - genetics
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Nerve Fibers, Myelinated - pathology
Pedigree
Spinocerebellar Degenerations - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Thalamic Diseases - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Thalamus - pathology
Abstract
To describe an unusual kindred with adult-onset ataxia and thalamic lesions detected by brain MRI.
The authors characterized clinical, laboratory, and pathologic features of the disease and sought linkage to previously recognized ataxia loci.
Two sisters and a brother developed progressive ataxia, dysarthria, mild cognitive impairment, and sensorimotor neuropathy at age 30, combined with epilepsy in one sibling. MRI showed symmetric thalamic lesions, changes in brainstem gray matter, and white matter changes in the cerebellum. Autopsy in one of the patients revealed neuronal degeneration with a peculiar vacuolar change in thalamus, probably representing transsynaptic degeneration in response to deafferentation. Neuronal and secondary tract degeneration was observed in the spinal cord, cerebellum, and brainstem suggesting a spinocerebellar degeneration. The disorder appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Genetic and sequence analysis of the FRDA gene and comprehensive laboratory examinations excluded Friedreich's ataxia and other similar recessive diseases.
Adult-onset recessive ataxia with bilateral thalamic lesions in this family may represent a distinct hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia.
PubMed ID
11571332 View in PubMed
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Advances in the development of genetic markers for the diagnosis of disease and drug response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18870
Source
Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2002 Sep;2(5):411-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Eva Halapi
Hakon Hakonarson
Author Affiliation
Division of Inflammation and Pharmacogenomics, deCODE genetics, Inc., Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. evah@decode.is
Source
Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2002 Sep;2(5):411-21
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - genetics
Central Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - genetics
Genetic markers
Humans
Linkage (Genetics)
Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Proteome
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Genetic diversity, including single nucleotide polymorphisms, contributes to both disease susceptibility and variability in drug response. Since most genes contain multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms, identifying those that are most relevant with respect to disease or drug response is important and may uncover variants that are predictive of either disease susceptibility or therapeutic response to drugs, both with respect to efficacy and toxic side effects. The candidate gene approach has been widely used to search for the genetic basis of pharmacogenomic traits. Although a few successful examples have emerged from this approach, notably trastuzumab (Herceptin; Genentech), imatinib mesylate (Gleevec (USA), Glivec; Novartis) and certain drugs that demonstrate variable efficacy or adverse effects that are attributed to metabolizing enzymes, for most drugs, the genetic variations that determine their clinical response remain uncovered. Genome-wide linkage approach presents an alternative to the candidate gene approach. The powerful combination of linkage when coupled to ultra-high-throughput genotyping, gene array and proteomics technology, together with innovative bioinformatic resources, provides a focused integrative strategy for pinpointing disease-causing genes that may generate validated drug targets and genes that are responsible for differential drug response. Thus, it is anticipated that genetic research will soon generate new information that can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies and diagnostic tests that will ultimately lead to safer and more efficacious drugs for all patients. This review addresses recent advances in the development of genetic markers that can be used to diagnose disease or drug response.
PubMed ID
12271813 View in PubMed
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773 records – page 1 of 78.