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ß2-adrenergic receptor Thr164Ile polymorphism, obesity, and diabetes: comparison with FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18 polymorphisms in more than 64,000 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125626
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Mette Thomsen
Morten Dahl
Anne Tybjærg-Hansen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4 - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) influences regulation of energy balance by stimulating catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipose tissue. The rare functional ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism could therefore influence risk of obesity and subsequently diabetes.
We tested the hypothesis that the ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism associates with risk of obesity and diabetes and compared effect sizes with those of FTO(rs9939609), MC4R(rs17782313), and TMEM18(rs6548238).
We conducted a population-based cohort study in Copenhagen, Denmark.
We genotyped more than 64,000 individuals from the Danish general population.
We evaluated body mass index (BMI), obesity (BMI =30 kg/m(2)), and diabetes.
Rare allele frequencies were 0.02 for T for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 0.40 for A for FTOrs9939609, 0.25 for C for MC4Rrs17782313, and 0.20 for T for TMEM18rs6548238. For rare vs. common homozygotes, odds ratio for obesity was 3.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.08-10.19) for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 1.42 (1.35-1.52) for FTOrs9939609, 1.18 (1.06-1.30) for MC4Rrs17782313, and 1.28 (1.10-1.50) for TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare). Corresponding odds ratios for diabetes were 1.85 (0.24-14.29), 1.22 (1.07-1.39), 0.96 (0.80-1.16), and 1.61 (1.17-2.22), respectively. After adjustment for BMI, only TMEM18rs6548238 remained associated with diabetes. BMI was increased in rare vs. common homozygotes in FTOrs9939609, MC4Rrs17782313, and TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare) but not in ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile).
Our results suggest that ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) rare vs. common homozygotes are not significantly associated with an increase in BMI measured continuously but may be associated with an increased risk of obesity. Also, TMEM18rs6548238 associated with risk of diabetes after adjustment for BMI. These findings need confirmation in other studies.
PubMed ID
22466342 View in PubMed
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24-h ambulatory blood pressure is linked to chromosome 18q21-22 and genetic variation of NEDD4L associates with cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure in Swedes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81774
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Aug;70(3):562-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Fava C.
von Wowern F.
Berglund G.
Carlson J.
Hedblad B.
Rosberg L.
Burri P.
Almgren P.
Melander O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Aug;70(3):562-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alternative Splicing
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - genetics
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Insulin - blood
Linkage (Genetics)
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases - genetics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Numerous linkage studies have indicated chromosome 18q21-22 as a locus of importance for blood pressure regulation. This locus harbors the neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated 4-like (NEDD4L) gene, which is instrumental for the regulation of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). In a linkage study of 16 markers (including two single nucleotide polymorphism markers located within the NEDD4L gene) on chromosome 18 between 70-104 cM and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), in 118 families, the strongest evidence of linkage was found for 24 h and day-time systolic ABP at the NEDD4L locus (82.25 cM) (P=0.0014). In a large population sample (n=4001), we subsequently showed that a NEDD4L gene variant (rs4149601), which by alternative splicing leads to varying expression of a functionally crucial C2 domain, was associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (P=0.03) and DBP progression over time (P=0.04). A genotype combination of the rs4149601 and an intronic NEDD4L marker (rs2288774) was associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) (P=0.01), DBP (P=0.04), and progression of both SBP (P=0.03) and DBP (P=0.05) over time. A quantitative transmission disequilibrium test in the family material of the rs4149601 supported this NEDD4L variant as being at least partially causative of the linkage result. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the chromosome 18 linkage peak at 82.25 cM is explained by genetic NEDD4L variation affecting cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure, possibly as a consequence of altered NEDD4L interaction with ENaC.
PubMed ID
16788695 View in PubMed
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The A1555G mtDNA mutation in Danish hearing-impaired patients: frequency and clinical signs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31346
Source
Clin Genet. 2002 Oct;62(4):303-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
E. ØStergaard
B. Montserrat-Sentis
K. Grønskov
K. Brøndum-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, The John F. Kennedy Institute, Glostrup, Denmark. els@kennedy.dk
Source
Clin Genet. 2002 Oct;62(4):303-5
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genetic Screening
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Point Mutation
Abstract
The A1555G mutation of the mtDNA is associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss. The A1555G is relatively frequent in the Spanish and some Asian populations, but has only been reported rarely in other populations, possibly because of ascertainment bias. We studied 85 Danish patients with varying degrees of hearing impairment and found two patients with the A1555G mutation (2.4%). Neither had received aminoglycosides. Our study indicates that the mutation might not be uncommon in Danish patients with hearing impairment.
PubMed ID
12372057 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of tuberculosis susceptibility genetic make-up in Tuvinians and Russians]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82359
Source
Mol Biol (Mosk). 2006 Mar-Apr;40(2):252-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
Freidin M B
Rudko A A
Kolokolova O V
Ondar E A
Strelis A K
Puzyrev V P
Source
Mol Biol (Mosk). 2006 Mar-Apr;40(2):252-62
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Ethnic Groups
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Siberia - epidemiology - ethnology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
The results of the first Russian study of polymorphisms of tuberculosis (TB) susceptibility genes SLC11A1, VDR, IL12B, IL1B, IL1RN in Tuvinians from Tuva Republic and Russians from Tomsk city are presented. In Tuvinians, as compared with Russians, the significantly higher prevalence of potentially disease-associated alleles of the genes studied was shown: SLC11A1*543N (0.139 and 0.043, respectively, p = 4.6E-5), IL12B*1188C (0.378 and 0.174, respectively, p = 1.1E-8), VDR*b (0.825 and 0.532, respectively, p = 3.2E-16), IL1B*(+3953A1) (0.865 and 0.806, respectively, p = 0.035). However, no one of these alleles was associated with TB in Tuvinians, whereas, in Russians TB patients, in comparison with the controls, there was a higher prevalence of the following markers: IL1RN*A2 (0.258 and 0.186, respectively, p = 0.024), SLC11A1*274T (0.251 and 0.164, respectively, p = 0.009), IL12B*1188C (0.240 and 0.174, respectively, p = 0.044), ILIB*(+3953A2) (0.259 and 0.194, respectively, p = 0.044). Distinct patterns of linkage disequilibrium between pairs of the polymorphisms studied in Tuvinians and Russians were shown. At whole, the data obtained demonstrate the ethnic specificity of the distribution and pathogenetic significance of the alleles of the TB susceptibility genes.
PubMed ID
16637265 View in PubMed
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Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in twins: a population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78124
Source
Spine. 2007 Apr 15;32(8):927-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2007
Author
Andersen Mikkel O
Thomsen Karsten
Kyvik Kirsten O
Author Affiliation
Spine Section, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital of Odense, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Spine. 2007 Apr 15;32(8):927-30
Date
Apr-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Denmark - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Scoliosis - epidemiology - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A questionnaire-based identification of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients in a twin cohort. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to establish a scoliosis twin cohort to provide data on the heritability of AIS. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The etiology of AIS is still unclear, and the true mode of inheritance has yet to be established. Concordance rates in monozygotic twins have been reported to be between 0.73 and 0.92, and in dizygotic twins between 0.36 and 0.63. Studies on concordance in twin pairs provide a basis for analyzing the influence of genetic versus environmental factors. METHODS: All 46,418 twins registered in the Danish Twin Registry born from 1931 to 1982 were sent a questionnaire, which included questions about scoliosis. A total of 34,944 (75.3%) representing 23,204 pairs returned the questionnaire. RESULTS: A subgroup of 220 subjects considered to have AIS was identified, thus giving a prevalence of 1.05%. The concordant twin pairs were all monozygotic. Pairwise, the concordance rate was 0.13 for monozygotic and zero for dizygotic twin pairs; proband-wise concordance was 0.25 for monozygotic and zero for dizygotic pairs. The concordance of monozygotic and dizygotic pairs was significantly different (P
PubMed ID
17426641 View in PubMed
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Allelic variants of upstream transcription factor 1 associate with carotid artery intima-media thickness: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156499
Source
Circ J. 2008 Jul;72(7):1158-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Collings A
Höyssä S
Fan M
Kähönen M
Hutri-Kähönen N
Marniemi J
Juonala M
Viikari JSA
Raitakari OT
Lehtimäki TJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, PO Box 2000, 33521 Tampere, Finland. Auni.Collings@pshp.fi
Source
Circ J. 2008 Jul;72(7):1158-64
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Haplotypes
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Upstream Stimulatory Factors - genetics
Abstract
Polymorphisms of the upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) have been associated with familial combined hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease. The impact of this gene on subclinical atherosclerosis is unknown. Associations of 3 allelic variants of the USF1 gene and their haplotypes with carotid artery intima - media thickness (IMT), carotid artery compliance (CAC) and brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD) were studied in a population of Finnish healthy young adults.
The study population comprised 2,281 individuals participating in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. IMT, CAC and FMD values were measured by ultrasound examination. Genotypes were analysed using the 5' nuclease assay. A significant difference in IMT was found for usf1s1 (rs3737787) and usf1s8 (rs2516838) genotypes (p-values 0.046 and 0.021, respectively). Moreover, there was a significant difference between groups in haplotype 1 and haplotype 2 for IMT (p-values 0.011 and 0.028 respectively). In multivariate stepwise linear regression models adjusted by age, sex, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, smoking, C-reactive protein, glucose, high- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterols and triglycerides there were significant associations for the usf1s1 minor genotype AA to predict low IMT (p=0.038) and usf1s8 minor genotype GG to predict high IMT (p=0.003). There was also a significant association for haplotype 2 to predict low IMT in the otherwise similar multivariate model (p=0.006). No associations were found for polymorphisms and CAC, FMD or serum lipids.
The rs2516838 and rs3737787 polymorphisms of USF1 influence the carotid artery IMT, which is a new finding.
PubMed ID
18577828 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of genetic predisposition to pulmonary tuberculosis in native Russians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144799
Source
Genetika. 2010 Feb;46(2):262-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
O A Gra
Zh M Kozhekbaeva
V I Litvinov
Source
Genetika. 2010 Feb;46(2):262-71
Date
Feb-2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Cation Transport Proteins - genetics
Cohort Studies
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology - ethnology
P-Glycoprotein - genetics
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important concerns of public health. There is evidence suggesting that genetic status is responsible for predisposition to infectious diseases including TB. To determine genetic risk factors of TB development, the frequencies of polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C 19, GSTT1, GSTM1, NAT2, MDR1, and NRAMP1 in 73 TB patients and 352 healthy individuals were determined by allele-specific hybridization using microarray technology. The TB patients have shown a significant increase in the frequency of the null GSTT1 genotype (OR = 3.26, 95% CI = 1.91 - 5.55, p = = 0.000028) as well as the double null GSTT1/GSTM1 genotype (OR = 4.05, 95% CI = 2.14 -7.65, p = = 0.000034) compared to the group of healthy donors. It was shown that the NAT2*5/*5 genotype in combination with the "null" GSTT1 and the double "null" GSTT1/GSTM1 genotypes was observed significantly more often in the TB patients than in the control sample. Thus the examined GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2 gene polymorphisms may potentially alter the risk of TB development in ethnic Russians and are of interest for further research using larger cohorts of patients.
PubMed ID
20297661 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the SORT1 gene in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126744
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2012 Aug;33(8):1845.e7-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Véronique V Belzil
Catherine André-Guimont
Marie-Renée Atallah
Hussein Daoud
Nicolas Dupré
Jean-Pierre Bouchard
William Camu
Patrick A Dion
Guy A Rouleau
Author Affiliation
Centre of Excellence in Neurosciences of Université de Montréal, CHUM Research Center, Montreal, QC H2L 4M1, Canada.
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2012 Aug;33(8):1845.e7-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - congenital - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Female
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Mutation - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Substantial efforts have been deployed in the past decade to identify the genetic causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and we hypothesized here that mutations in SORT1 or aberrant SORT1 splicing reduce progranulin level and promote neurodegeneration.
We sequenced the coding exons of SORT1 in a cohort of 112 unrelated individuals with familial ALS. We also tested for aberrant SORT1 splicing by RT-PCR using RNA samples from cell lines expressing six different ALS-associated TARDBP mutations.
We identified one unique missense and two unique silent mutations in our cohort. None are predicted to have functional effects. No aberrant SORT1 splicing event was observed.
SORT1 mutations are not a common cause of familial ALS, and the influence of TARDBP mutations on SORT1 splicing still needs to be clarified.
PubMed ID
22361451 View in PubMed
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An extended Swedish national adoption study of alcohol use disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263536
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;72(3):211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Kenneth S Kendler
Jianguang Ji
Alexis C Edwards
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;72(3):211-8
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Child
Environment
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol use disorder (AUD) runs strongly in families. It is unclear to what extent the cross-generational transmission of AUD results from genetic vs environmental factors.
To determine to what extent genetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk for AUD.
Follow-up in 8 public data registers of adoptees, their biological and adoptive relatives, and offspring and parents from stepfamilies and not-lived-with families in Sweden. In this cohort study, subtypes of AUD were assessed by latent class analysis. A total of 18,115 adoptees (born 1950-1993) and 171,989 and 107,696 offspring of not-lived-with parents and stepparents, respectively (born 1960-1993).
Alcohol use disorder recorded in medical, legal, or pharmacy registry records.
Alcohol use disorder in adoptees was significantly predicted by AUD in biological parents (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.29-1.66) and siblings (odds ratio, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.55-2.44) as well as adoptive parents (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.09-1.80). Genetic and environmental risk indices created from biological and adoptive relatives acted additively on adoptee AUD liability. Results from biological and adoptive relatives were replicated and extended from examinations of, respectively, not-lived-with parents and stepparents. Multivariate models in these families showed that AUD in offspring was significantly predicted by AUD, drug abuse, psychiatric illness, and crime in not-lived-with parents and by AUD, drug abuse, crime, and premature death in stepparents. Latent class analyses of adoptees and offspring of not-lived-with parents with AUDs revealed 3 AUD classes characterized by (1) female preponderance and high rates of psychiatric illness, (2) mild nonrecurrent symptoms, and (3) early-onset recurrence, drug abuse, and crime. These classes had distinct genetic signatures in the patterns of risk for various disorders in their not-lived-with parents and striking differences in the rates of recorded mood disorders.
Parent-offspring transmission of AUD results from both genetic and environmental factors. Genetic risk for AUD reflects both a specific liability to AUD and to other externalizing disorders. Environmental risk reflects features of both parental psychopathology and other aspects of the rearing environment. Alcohol use disorder is a heterogeneous syndrome and meaningful subtypes emerged from latent class analysis, which were validated by patterns of disorders in biological parents and specific psychiatric comorbidities. The general population contains informative family constellations that can complement more traditional adoption designs in clarifying the sources of parent-offspring resemblance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25565339 View in PubMed
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294 records – page 1 of 30.