Skip header and navigation

Refine By

35 records – page 1 of 4.

Absence of RAS and p53 mutations in thyroid carcinomas of children after Chernobyl in contrast to adult thyroid tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21720
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(6):952-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
B. Suchy
V. Waldmann
S. Klugbauer
H M Rabes
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pathology, University of Munich, Germany.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1998 Mar;77(6):952-5
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Age Factors
Base Sequence
Byelarus
Child
Exons
Gene Rearrangement
Genes, Regulator
Genes, p53
Genes, ras
Humans
Mutagenesis
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Ukraine
Abstract
Thyroid carcinomas of an additional series of 34 children exposed to radioactive fall-out after the Chernobyl reactor accident were analysed for mutations in the H-, K- and N-RAS and the p53 gene. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing did not disclose mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61 of RAS genes nor mutations in exons 5, 7 and 8 of p53. Considering the recently reported high prevalence of RET rearrangements of the PTC3 type in childhood tumours after Chernobyl (Klugbauer et al, 1995, Oncogene 11: 2459-2467), it follows that RET rearrangements are the most relevant molecular aberration in these radiation-induced tumours. RAS or p53 mutations do not play a role in childhood thyroid carcinogenesis after Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
9528840 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age-related and clinical-pathogenetic features of colorectal cancer associated with status of K-ras gene].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123353
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(1):72-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
A V Beliaeva
G A Ianus
E N Suspithyn
O A Zaitseva
O S Iatsuk
A B Moiseenko
A V Guliaev
E N Imianitov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(1):72-8
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics - pathology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Female
Genes, ras - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Mutation Rate
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Russia
Abstract
Activating mutation in K-ras gene is a key event in the pathogenesis of colon carcinoma. This study analyses frequency of this mutation in different age groups of colorectal cancer patients residing in North-Western Russia, and examines its relationship with essential clinical characteristics of tumor disease.
PubMed ID
22708448 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allele diversity of the H-ras-1 variable number of tandem repeats in Norwegian lung cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24309
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1992 Nov;98:187-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
D. Ryberg
T. Tefre
V. Skaug
L. Stangeland
S. Ovrebø
A. Naalsund
A L Børresen
A. Haugen
Author Affiliation
Department of Toxicology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1992 Nov;98:187-9
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
Genes, ras - genetics
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - genetics
Norway
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We have examined restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the H-ras-1 gene in germ-line DNA from 214 lung cancer patients and 309 unaffected controls. When DNA samples were digested with MspI/HpaII, Southern blot analysis revealed at least 22 different alleles, grouped according to their frequencies as common, intermediate, and rare. The frequency of rare alleles in lung cancer patients (16/428) is significantly different (p = 0.002) from that in the control group (5/618). Individuals with rare alleles were found to be at 4.7-fold greater risk of lung cancer than those with no rare alleles.
PubMed ID
1362538 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Association of renal carcinoma and the exposure to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18460
Source
Actas Urol Esp. 2003 Feb;27(2):164-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
A. Blanco Espinosa
M. Leva Vallejo
F. Merlo de la Peña
P. Moreno Arcas
J L Carazo Carazo
M J Requena Tapia
Author Affiliation
Servicio de Urología, Hospital Regional Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba.
Source
Actas Urol Esp. 2003 Feb;27(2):164-7
Date
Feb-2003
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Allelic Imbalance
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 - genetics
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
English Abstract
Female
Genes, ras
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Nuclear Reactors
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - analysis
Spain
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
After the nuclear accident of Chernobyl, in the population of zones contaminated the malignant renal tumors was increased from 4.7 to 7.5 per 100,000 of total population. Cesium 137 (137Cs) constitutes 80-90% of the internal exposure of these people as well as eliminated through kidneys becomes an important risk factor. We present a case of a patient, residing in radiocontamined area, who consulted for abdominal pain and left flank mass. We review relevant literature and the management of these patients.
PubMed ID
12731334 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chromosome abnormalities, cellular DNA content, oncogene amplification and growth pattern in agar culture of human neuroblastomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24928
Source
Anticancer Res. 1991 Jan-Feb;11(1):353-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
N L Carlsen
B T Mortensen
P K Andersson
J K Larsen
O H Nielsen
N. Tommerup
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Haematology, Finsen Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Anticancer Res. 1991 Jan-Feb;11(1):353-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agar
Cell Division
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Culture Techniques - methods
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Gene Amplification
Genes, myc
Genes, ras
Humans
Infant
Karyotyping
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Neuroblastoma - genetics - pathology - surgery
Oncogenes
Tumor Cells, Cultured - cytology
Abstract
The association of ability to grow in vitro, non-random chromosome abnormalities, DNA ploidy and oncogene amplification with prognosis may lead to a better understanding of the biology of neuroblastomas. In a pilot study fresh tumour tissue was obtained from 4 consecutive patients at the Department of Paediatric Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Chromosome abnormalities were detected in 3 out of 3 successfully karyotyped tumours, and one or more aneuploid stem lines were detected in 4 out of 4 tumours using flow cytometry. The N-myc oncogene was amplified in 1 out of 3 tumours tested. Continuous cell lines could be established from all 3 advanced stage tumours. This pilot study has shown that fresh tumour tissue can be obtained and successfully studied for various fundamental aspects of the biology of neuroblastomas.
PubMed ID
2018371 View in PubMed
Less detail

Classification of advanced colorectal carcinomas by tumor edge morphology: evidence for different pathogenesis and significance of polypoid and nonpolypoid tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20152
Source
Cancer. 2000 Nov 1;89(9):1901-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2000
Author
S M George
M J Mäkinen
P. Jernvall
J. Mäkelä
P. Vihko
T J Karttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer. 2000 Nov 1;89(9):1901-9
Date
Nov-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - classification - genetics - pathology
Carcinoma - classification - genetics - pathology
Classification - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - classification - genetics - pathology
Genes, ras
Humans
Medical Oncology - methods
Mutation
Observer Variation
Pathology - methods
Polyploidy
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that a substantial proportion of colorectal carcinomas develop without a preexisting polypoid adenomatous lesion, but it is difficult to detect the possible origin of advanced carcinomas. The purpose of this study was to test the validity and significance of a new histopathologic classification system based on the histologic analysis of the tumor edge. METHODS: One hundred eighty-six unselected cases of colorectal carcinoma were included. A new classification method to distinguish polypoid and nonpolypoid growth type was based on the presence or absence of elevation of tumor as compared with adjacent mucosa. Inter- and intraobserver agreement of classification was tested. Association with other clinicopathologic features including histopathologic characteristics of the tumors, presence or absence of lesional and concurrent adenoma, K-ras mutations, and prognosis was evaluated. RESULTS: Classification could be made in 75% of the tumors, and 25% were unclassifiable, mostly due to absence of tumor margin in sections. Of the classifiable carcinomas, 45% were classified as polypoid, of which 52% had lesional adenoma. Nonpolypoid tumors formed 48% of classifiable cases, and only 2% had lesional adenoma. Features of both polypoid and nonpolypoid carcinomas were present in 7% of cases. Concurrent extralesional adenomas were found more frequently in association with polypoid carcinomas. K-ras mutations were more common in polypoid (43%) than in nonpolypoid tumors (8%; P = 0.018). Nonpolypoid carcinomas were significantly (P = 0.03) more aggressive than polypoid carcinoma, with 38% and 20% recurrence rates, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The authors' results indicate that advanced colorectal carcinomas can be classified according to growth pattern by observing the tumor edge. This classification has prognostic significance because nonpolypoid carcinomas appeared to have a worse prognosis than polypoid ones.
PubMed ID
11064346 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical significance of K-RAS and cytokeratine 20 markers in diagnosis of lymphogenic metastasis of pancreatic cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16492
Source
Klin Khir. 2005 Aug;(8):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
S V Zemskov
Source
Klin Khir. 2005 Aug;(8):32-5
Date
Aug-2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - genetics - pathology - surgery
Disease-Free Survival
English Abstract
Genes, ras - genetics
Humans
Keratin - genetics
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mutation
Pancreatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics - pathology - surgery
Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics
Abstract
Aim of the work is to estimate the role of the metastases molecular signs (MMS) in paraaortal lymphatic nodes, revealed using combined molecular-biological method with application of K-RAS markers and cytokeratine 20 (CK20) for the survival prognostication in the pancreatic head cancer patients after performing pancreatoduodenal resection. Actuarial index of general survival of the patients with MMS in paraaortal lymphatic nodes was trustworthy lower than in patients without such a signs. The two-year survival index in patients without MMS was 60%, the survival mediana--32 mo. Any of the patients with MMS did not survive two years, the survival mediana was 13 mo.
PubMed ID
16445057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Codon 12 region of mouse K-ras gene is the site for in vitro binding of transcription factors GATA-6 and NF-Y.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16650
Source
Biochemistry (Mosc). 2005 Oct;70(10):1180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
E V Gorshkova
V I Kaledin
V F Kobzev
T I Merkulova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia. schly@mail.ru
Source
Biochemistry (Mosc). 2005 Oct;70(10):1180-4
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Binding Sites
CCAAT-Binding Factor - metabolism
Codon - genetics
Ethylnitrosourea - chemistry
GATA6 Transcription Factor - metabolism
Genes, ras - genetics
Lung - cytology - metabolism
Lung Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Methylcholanthrene - chemistry
Mice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Codon 12 of the K-ras gene is a generally recognized example of a mutational hot spot. By the approach of gel retardation and specific antibodies, a double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to the codon 12 region of the mouse K-ras gene (from 20 to 50 bp with respect to the exon 1 start) was found to be a site for cooperative binding of the transcription factors GATA-6 and NF-Y. GATA-6 and NF-Y were selectively activated with lung carcinogens 3-methylcholanthrene and nitrosoethylurea in mice of strains susceptible to lung tumorigenesis but not in animals of resistant strains. The interaction of GATA-6 and NF-Y with the codon 12 region of the K-ras gene is suggested to be involved in the mechanism of lung carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
16271038 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collagen formation in extracellular matrix of transplants of human transformed keratinocyte cell lines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18955
Source
Anticancer Res. 2002 May-Jun;22(3):1705-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tommi Jussila
Saila Kauppila
Leila Risteli
Juha Risteli
Frej Stenbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Anticancer Res. 2002 May-Jun;22(3):1705-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cell Cycle
Cell Differentiation - physiology
Cell Division - physiology
Cell Line, Transformed
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic - metabolism
Collagen - biosynthesis
Epithelial Cells - cytology
Extracellular Matrix - metabolism
Genes, ras
Humans
Keratinocytes - cytology - metabolism - transplantation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Stromal Cells - cytology
Abstract
BACKGROUND, MATERIALS AND METHODS: The role of epithelial cell growth and neoplastic transformation on collagen formation and deposition in the extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed by culturing immortalized human epidermal cell lines and Ras-transformed benign and malignant clones on collagen gels as transplants. The lesions were analyzed for extent of growth and morphology of epithelial and mesenchymal components as well as synthesis and deposition of different collagens. RESULTS: Immortalized cell lines required up to 5 weeks of growth for a well-organized mesenchyme to develop; transplants of Ras-transformed benign clones needed 3 weeks and transplants of highly malignant clones only 2 weeks to form an organized stroma. In transplants of immortalized cells after 2 weeks of growth newly-synthesized collagen type I and type III were deposited in the mesenchyme adjacent to the muscle, forming a mature ECM, while ECM was absent adjacent to growing, differentiated, immortalized cells. In transplants of Ras-transformed benign clones the subepithelial ECM was immature at day 14, but it was forming fibers at the same time in transplants of malignant clones. These were seen as thin irregular fibers in immunohistochemistry, ultimately organized into fibrillar structures in similar locations to active synthesis detected by in situ hybridization. Depositions of crosslinked mature type I collagen occurred later in similar locations. Type III collagen synthesis and deposition was most prominent in transplants of malignant cell clones, with degradation and destruction of the extracellular matrix around invading islets of malignant cells. CONCLUSION: The development of mesenchyme was directly related to duration of growth of transplants and degree of malignancy; mesenchyme organization was inversely related to differentiation of the epithelial cells. The results showed the usefulness of the transplant model in studies on cell and tissue growth and organization.
PubMed ID
12168857 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Determination of the activated proto-oncogene (Ki-ras) in feces. A new laboratory analysis for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23037
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 30;115(26):3266-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
J J Koornstra
O. Røkke
J F Halvorsen
K. Haug
D. Ogreid
Author Affiliation
Senter for klinisk molekylaermedisin, Laboratorium for klinisk biokjemi, Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 30;115(26):3266-70
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
English Abstract
Feces
Genes, ras
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Proto-Oncogenes
Rectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in Norway. Many cases of the disease are detected at a stage where surgery is unlikely to result in cure. Currently used screening tests based on faecal occult blood and other tumour markers are poor indicators of colorectal neoplasia. Multiple gene alterations are associated with colorectal carcinogenesis. Mutations in the Ki-ras oncogene occur in 50% of colorectal carcinomas and also in 50% of the precursor lesions, the adenomas. These mutations have proved to be detectable in the faeces of patients with colorectal tumours, but the techniques used so far have been impractical for screening purposes. We have developed a rapid and simple laboratory technique, based on the polymerase chain reaction, for detecting mutated Ki-ras in the faeces. In eight of 12 patients with mutated Ki-ras in adenomas or carcinomas we found the corresponding mutations in stool samples. Our results represent a significant progression towards a simple and effective DNA-based screening strategy for early detection of curable colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
7482456 View in PubMed
Less detail

35 records – page 1 of 4.