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5-HT2C receptor and MAO-A interaction analysis: no association with suicidal behaviour in bipolar patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157011
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Vincenzo De Luca
Subi Tharmaligam
John Strauss
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, R-30, Toronto (ON), Canada M5T 1R8. vincenzo_deluca@camh.net
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics - psychology
Canada
Family Health
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, X-Linked
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Nuclear Family
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C - genetics
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The serotonin 2C (HTR2C) receptor has been implicated in suicide-related behaviours, however there are not many studies to date about HTR2C and suicidality. We studied HTR2C haplotypes in suicide attempters, where our sample composed of 306 families with at least one member affected by bipolar disorder. HTR2C (Cys23Ser and a common STR in the promoter) variants were analyzed with respect to attempter status and the severity of suicidal behaviour. The X-linked haplotype analysis in relation to suicide attempt did not reveal any significant association. Furthermore, we performed a particular gene-gene interaction for the X-linked serotonergic genes (HTR2C and MAOA), and found no association among this intergenic haplotype combination and suicidal behaviour in bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
18504633 View in PubMed
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Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;16(2):216-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
L M Fiori
H. Zouk
C. Himmelman
G. Turecki
Author Affiliation
McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;16(2):216-26
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetyltransferases - genetics
Adaptor Protein Complex sigma Subunits - genetics
Adult
Brain
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Chromosome Mapping
Depression - complications - genetics - pathology
GTPase-Activating Proteins - genetics
Gene Expression Profiling - methods
Genes, X-Linked - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Genotype
Humans
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 90-kDa - genetics
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90 ?kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers.
PubMed ID
20010893 View in PubMed
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X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts: evidence from two population-based studies in Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123184
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e39240
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Astanand Jugessur
Øivind Skare
Rolv T Lie
Allen J Wilcox
Kaare Christensen
Lene Christiansen
Truc Trung Nguyen
Jeffrey C Murray
Håkon K Gjessing
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. astanand.jugessur@fhi.no
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e39240
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cleft Lip - epidemiology - genetics
Cleft Palate - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genes, X-Linked
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Models, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
X Chromosome Inactivation
Abstract
Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis of X-linked markers.
We added new functionalities in the HAPLIN statistical software to enable association analysis of X-linked markers and an exploration of various causal scenarios relevant to orofacial clefts. Genotypes for 48 SNPs in 18 candidate genes on the X chromosome were analyzed in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (562 Norwegian and 235 Danish case-parent triads). For haplotype analysis, we used a sliding-window approach and assessed isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (iCL/P) separately from isolated cleft palate only (iCPO). We tested three statistical models in HAPLIN, allowing for: i) the same relative risk in males and females, ii) sex-specific relative risks, and iii) X-inactivation in females. We found weak but consistent associations with the oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) gene (formerly known as CXORF5) in the Danish iCL/P samples across all models, but not in the Norwegian iCL/P samples. In sex-specific analyses, the association with OFD1 was in male cases only. No analyses showed associations with iCPO in either the Norwegian or the Danish sample.
The association of OFD1 with iCL/P is plausible given the biological relevance of this gene. However, the lack of replication in the Norwegian samples highlights the need to verify these preliminary findings in other large datasets. More generally, the novel analytic methods presented here are widely applicable to investigations of the role of X-linked genes in complex traits.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22723972 View in PubMed
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