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4920 records – page 1 of 492.

ß2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms, asthma and COPD: two large population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129736
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
M. Thomsen
B G Nordestgaard
A A Sethi
A. Tybjærg-Hansen
M. Dahl
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Incidence
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is an important regulator of airway smooth muscle tone. We tested the hypothesis that three functional polymorphisms in the ADRB2 gene (Thr164Ile, Gly16Arg and Gln27Glu) are associated with reduced lung function, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We first genotyped 8,971 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study for all three polymorphisms. To validate our findings, we genotyped an additional 53,777 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study for the Thr164Ile polymorphism. We identified 60,910 Thr164Ile noncarriers, 1,822 heterozygotes and 16 homozygotes. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Thr164Ile genotype was associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) % predicted (trend p = 0.01) and FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (p = 0.001): Thr164Ile heterozygotes had 3% and 2% reduced FEV(1) % pred and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively, compared with noncarriers. The odds ratio for COPD in Thr164Ile heterozygotes was 1.46 (95% CI 1.05-2.02). In the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Thr164 genotype associated with reduced FEV(1) % pred (p = 0.04) and FEV(1)/FVC (p
PubMed ID
22075484 View in PubMed
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2-DE protein expression in endometrial carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80911
Source
Acta Oncol. 2006;45(6):685-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Caroline, L
Johanna, L
Susanne, B
Uwe, R
Kjell, S
Karolina, B
Bo, F
Britta, N
Gert, A
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecologic Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Institute of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. caroline.lundgren@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2006;45(6):685-94
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma - metabolism
Cluster analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Endometrial Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Female
Gene Expression
Histocytochemistry
Humans
Neoplasm Proteins - metabolism
Ploidies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore the protein expression pattern in normal endometrial mucosa (n = 5) and endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) of low (diploid) and high (aneuploid) malignancy potential by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The specimens were evaluated for histopathologic subtype, stage and grade in relation to DNA ploidy. A match-set consisting of five samples from normal endometrium, eight diploid and seven aneuploid tumours was created. All the diploid and three of the aneuploid tumours were of endometrioid subtype, while the remaining four were of uterine seropapillary type. There were 192 protein spots differentiating diploid tumours from normal endometrium and 238 protein spots were separating aneuploid tumours from normal endometrium (p
PubMed ID
16938811 View in PubMed
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5-HT2C receptor and MAO-A interaction analysis: no association with suicidal behaviour in bipolar patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157011
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Vincenzo De Luca
Subi Tharmaligam
John Strauss
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, R-30, Toronto (ON), Canada M5T 1R8. vincenzo_deluca@camh.net
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics - psychology
Canada
Family Health
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, X-Linked
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Nuclear Family
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C - genetics
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The serotonin 2C (HTR2C) receptor has been implicated in suicide-related behaviours, however there are not many studies to date about HTR2C and suicidality. We studied HTR2C haplotypes in suicide attempters, where our sample composed of 306 families with at least one member affected by bipolar disorder. HTR2C (Cys23Ser and a common STR in the promoter) variants were analyzed with respect to attempter status and the severity of suicidal behaviour. The X-linked haplotype analysis in relation to suicide attempt did not reveal any significant association. Furthermore, we performed a particular gene-gene interaction for the X-linked serotonergic genes (HTR2C and MAOA), and found no association among this intergenic haplotype combination and suicidal behaviour in bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
18504633 View in PubMed
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6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301335
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Gene Frequency
Genetic Loci
Genetics, Population
Genotype
HLA Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Population Groups
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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The 14q restless legs syndrome locus in the French Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179886
Source
Ann Neurol. 2004 Jun;55(6):887-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Anastasia Levchenko
Jacques-Yves Montplaisir
Marie-Pierre Dubé
Jean-Baptiste Riviere
Judith St-Onge
Gustavo Turecki
Lan Xiong
Pascale Thibodeau
Alex Desautels
Dominique J Verlaan
Guy A Rouleau
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Neuroscience, McGill University Health Centre Research Institute, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Ann Neurol. 2004 Jun;55(6):887-91
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genes, Dominant
Genes, Recessive
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lod Score
Male
Pedigree
Restless Legs Syndrome - genetics
Abstract
A new restless legs syndrome locus on chromosome 14 recently has been reported in one family of Italian origin. Our study aimed to replicate this finding and determine the importance of this locus in the French Canadian population. Markers spanning the region were genotyped in 14 large families and linkage assessed using two-point and multipoint logarithm of odds scores. Possible linkage to this locus was found in one of our kindreds providing support for the existence of this locus and indicating that this locus may be responsible for a small fraction of French Canadian restless legs syndrome.
PubMed ID
15174026 View in PubMed
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17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in human breast cancer cells: regulation of expression by a progestin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24541
Source
Cancer Res. 1992 Jan 15;52(2):290-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1992
Author
M. Poutanen
B. Moncharmont
R. Vihko
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer Res. 1992 Jan 15;52(2):290-4
Date
Jan-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - genetics - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - drug effects
Humans
Isoenzymes - genetics
Placenta - enzymology
Pregnenediones - pharmacology
Progesterone Congeners - pharmacology
RNA, Messenger - genetics
RNA, Neoplasm - genetics
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Receptors, Progesterone - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
The expression of the 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17-HSD) gene in a series of human breast cancer cell lines was studied by Northern blot hybridization with a cDNA probe and by a time-resolved immunofluorometric assay using polyclonal antibodies against the enzyme protein. The 17-HSD enzyme protein concentration was measured in the 800 x g cell extract. A high concentration was measured in the BT-20 cell line, corresponding to one-fourth of the average concentration in placental tissue. Western blot analysis indicated that the antigen corresponded to a single Mr 35,000 band. In 2 other cell lines (MDA-MB-361 and T-47D), the 17-HSD protein concentration was much lower, but still measurable, whereas in the remaining 5 cell lines (HBL-100, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and ZR-75-1) it was below the detection limit of the assay. Treatment of the cells for 5 days with the synthetic progestin, ORG2058, resulted in an increase of the 17-HSD protein concentration only in the T-47D cell line. By Northern blot analysis, a low level of 2.3-kilobase mRNA transcripts was detected in all 8 cell lines. In addition, a 1.3-kilobase 17-HSD mRNA was present in the samples from the 3 cell lines containing measurable amounts of 17-HSD protein in the cell extract, and the band intensities were proportional to the amount of protein measured with the immunofluorometric assay. Only in the T-47D cell line did progestin treatment correspond to an increased amount of the 17-HSD 1.3-kilobase mRNA. These results suggest that the 1.3-kilobase mRNA for 17-HSD is the form most closely associated with protein expression and is also the only form responding to the progestin induction of the 17-HSD gene.
PubMed ID
1728403 View in PubMed
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17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases--their role in pathophysiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17852
Source
Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2004 Feb 27;215(1-2):83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2004
Author
P. Vihko
P. Härkönen
P. Soronen
S. Törn
A. Herrala
R. Kurkela
A. Pulkka
O. Oduwole
V. Isomaa
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu and Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland. pvihko@whoccr.oulu.fi
Source
Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2004 Feb 27;215(1-2):83-8
Date
Feb-27-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - metabolism
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - metabolism
Humans
Neoplasms - enzymology
Oxygen - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs) regulate the biological activity of sex steroid hormones in a variety of tissues by catalyzing the interconversions between highly active steroid hormones, e.g. estradiol and testosterone, and corresponding less active hormones, estrone and androstenedione. Epidemiological and endocrine evidence indicates that estrogens play a role in the etiology of breast cancer, while androgens are involved in mechanisms controlling the growth of normal and malignant prostatic cells. Using LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines, we have developed a cell model to study the progression of prostate cancer. In the model LNCaP cells are transformed in culture condition into more aggressive cells. Our data suggest that substantial changes in androgen and estrogen metabolism occur in the cells, leading to increased production of active estrogens during the process. In breast cancer, the reductive 17HSD type 1 activity is predominant in malignant cells, while the oxidative 17HSD type 2 mainly seems to be present in non-malignant breast epithelial cells. Deprivation of an estrogen response by using specific 17HSD type 1 inhibitors is a tempting approach in treating estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Our recent studies demonstrate that in addition to sex hormone target tissues, estrogens may be important in the development of cancer in some other tissues previously not considered to be estrogen target tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract.
PubMed ID
15026178 View in PubMed
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17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2: independent prognostic significance and evidence of estrogen protection in female patients with colon cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18039
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Olayiwola O Oduwole
Markus J Mäkinen
Veli V Isomaa
Anitta Pulkka
Petra Jernvall
Tuomo J Karttunen
Pirkko T Vihko
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu, Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Reproductive Health, P.O. Box 5000, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2003 Nov;87(2-3):133-40
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics - pathology
Comparative Study
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Isoenzymes - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The mRNA expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1 and 2 enzymes catalyzing opposite reaction of estrogen metabolism was investigated in colon cancer. Further, the significance of the 17HSD type 2 enzyme as a possible marker of colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis was studied. In the normal mucosa, 17HSD type 2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in the surface epithelium and in the upper parts of the crypts. In the lamina propria expression was seen in endothelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes. In colorectal tumors, 17HSD type 2 expression was in most cases downregulated. Female patients had significantly more cancers with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression (n=11/35; 31%) than male patients (n=3/39; 8%) (P=0.02). We observed a significant impact of 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression on survival in female patients with distal colorectal cancer (n=24), with an overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of 54% in those with low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression. None of the female patients with high 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression survived (n=11; P=0.0068; log rank 7.32). In male patients, no significant association with survival was observed. Our data provide evidence suggesting that low 17HSD type 2 mRNA expression is an independent marker of favorable prognosis in females with distal colorectal cancer, supporting the presence of gender- and location-related differences in the pathogenesis of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
14672733 View in PubMed
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22q11.2 microduplication in two patients with bladder exstrophy and hearing impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146325
Source
Eur J Med Genet. 2010 Mar-Apr;53(2):61-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johanna Lundin
Cilla Söderhäll
Lina Lundén
Anna Hammarsjö
Iréne White
Jacqueline Schoumans
Göran Läckgren
Christina Clementson Kockum
Agneta Nordenskjöld
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Med Genet. 2010 Mar-Apr;53(2):61-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bladder Exstrophy - genetics
Chromosomes - ultrastructure
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22
Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Female
Gene Duplication
Hearing Loss - genetics
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Molecular Probe Techniques
Phenotype
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
Bladder exstrophy is a congenital malformation of the bladder and urethra. The genetic basis of this malformation is unknown however it is well known that chromosomal aberrations can lead to defects in organ development. A few bladder exstrophy patients have been described to carry chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal rearrangements of 22q11.2 are implicated in several genomic disorders i.e. DiGeorge/velocardiofacial- and cat-eye syndrome. Deletions within this chromosomal region are relatively common while duplications of 22q11.2 are much less frequently observed. An increasing number of reports of microduplications of this region describe a highly variable phenotype. We have performed array-CGH analysis of 36 Swedish bladder exstrophy patients. The analysis revealed a similar and approximately 3 Mb duplication, consistent with the recently described 22q11.2 microduplication syndrome, in two unrelated cases with bladder exstrophy and hearing impairment. This finding was confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and FISH analysis. Subsequent MLPA analysis of this chromosomal region in 33 bladder exstrophy patients did not reveal any deletion/duplication within this region. MLPA analysis of 171 anonymous control individuals revealed one individual carrying this microduplication. This is the first report of 22q11.2 microduplication associated with bladder exstrophy and hearing impairment. Furthermore the finding of one carrier among a cohort of normal controls further highlights the variable phenotype linked to this microduplication syndrome.
PubMed ID
20045748 View in PubMed
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4920 records – page 1 of 492.