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Assessment of objectives of post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195753
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Epstein
A. Tejani
P. Glassman
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada.
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Dental
Canada
Clinical Competence
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Education, Dental, Graduate - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Endodontics - education
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Oral Medicine - education
Organizational Objectives
Orthodontics - education
Pathology, Oral - education
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Periodontics - education
Pharmacology - education
Practice Management, Dental
Preventive Dentistry - education
Primary Health Care
Prosthodontics - education
Public Health Dentistry - education
Questionnaires
Surgery, Oral - education
United States
Abstract
Objectives of hospital-based post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada were assessed by questionnaire. Seventy percent (14 of 20) of the program directors responded. Educational goals and objectives were assessed in professional skills and practice management, public health and preventive dentistry, oral medicine and pathology, special needs patient care, trauma and emergency care, restorative/prosthodontic care, endodontics, orthodontics/pediatric dentistry, oral surgery, periodontics, pharmacology, and functioning in a hospital. High rankings of proficiency were related to primary care, restorative/prosthodontic, endodontic, and surgical care. Emergency care, sedation, and pharmacology were also ranked highly. Lower rankings of proficiency were reported in orthodontics, aspects of public health dentistry, practice management, and advanced oral and maxiliofacial surgery. When the results of the Canadian survey were compared with those of a survey of US post-doctoral general dentistry programs, substantial similarity was seen. The findings support continuing reciprocity in accreditation standards between the Canadian and American Commissions on Dental Education and Dental Accreditation.
PubMed ID
11203897 View in PubMed
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Attitudes, awareness and perceptions on evidence based dentistry and scientific publications among dental professionals in the county of Halland, Sweden: a questionnaire survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84011
Source
Swed Dent J. 2007;31(3):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rabe Per
Holmén Anders
Sjögren Petteri
Author Affiliation
Maxillofacial unit, Halmstad Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2007;31(3):113-20
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Databases, Bibliographic
Dental Hygienists
Dentistry - standards
Dentists
Education, Dental, Continuing
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
General Practice, Dental - education - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Periodicals
Private Sector
Public Sector
Publishing
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The objective was to identify dental professionals' attitudes and awareness on evidence based dentistry (EBD), and to elucidate perceived barriers and views on how to move towards EBD. A questionnaire was sent to 290 dental professionals (dental hygienists, general dentists, specialist dentists) in the county of Halland, Sweden. The questionnaire consisted of closed questions and free text sections, related to attitudes, awareness and skills on databases, EBD, and terms related to scientific publications, as well as perceived barriers towards EBD. A majority of the respondents had a welcoming attitude towards EBD. The respondents perceived their colleagues less positive towards EBD. The respondents considered EBD, at least partly, useful in daily dental practice. With the exception of general dentists in private practice, a vast majority of the dental professionals thought that EBD would improve the care of their patients. Dental professionals in the county of Halland, in Sweden, had a welcoming attitude towards EBD, and indicated an open attitude for learning more about interpretation of evidence from scientific publications. The most commonly perceived barriers towards EBD, were 'lack of time' and 'poor availability of evidence'.
PubMed ID
17970167 View in PubMed
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Certification of competence: a national standard for dentistry in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210474
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1996 Dec;62(12):928-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M A Boyd
J D Gerrow
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1996 Dec;62(12):928-30
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Clinical Competence
General Practice, Dental - education - standards
Humans
Licensure, Dental - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Population Dynamics
Specialty Boards
Abstract
After consulting a large community of interested parties, the National Dental Examining Board of Canada (NDEB) and the provincial licensing authorities recently made significant changes to the certification process for dentists in Canada. This paper provides a chronology of the evolution of national certification and a summary of the present certification processes for graduates of both accredited and non-accredited programs.
Notes
Comment In: J Can Dent Assoc. 1997 Dec;63(11):804-59433021
PubMed ID
8990676 View in PubMed
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Changes in orthodontic care patterns in a predoctoral children's dentistry clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159697
Source
J Dent Educ. 2007 Dec;71(12):1549-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Stanley A Alexander
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, One Kneeland Street, Boston, MA 02111, USA. stanley.alexander@tufts.edu
Source
J Dent Educ. 2007 Dec;71(12):1549-53
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Clinical Competence
Dental Care for Children - manpower
Dental Clinics - manpower
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Education, Dental, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Faculty, Dental - statistics & numerical data
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Manitoba
Organizational Innovation
Orthodontic Appliances - statistics & numerical data
Orthodontics - education
Orthodontics, Corrective - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in orthodontic care patterns over a sixteen-year period in a university clinical setting. The average numbers of students, clinical procedures, and orthodontic appliances were examined from the time period 1988-2003. Appliance number and type were evaluated as a function of increased predoctoral and postdoctoral class sizes, student to faculty ratios, and decreased operating budgets for faculty recruitment. For the period 1988-98, the insertion of orthodontic appliances by dental students remained constant. A permanent increase in the predoctoral class size occurred in 1996 without an increase in faculty support, contributing to a decline in appliance insertions by students from 1999 to 2003. This time period also saw major increases in the postdoctoral class size and a reorganization of the clinical facility that then began to require the pairing of dental students to provide comprehensive care, thus decreasing their clinical exposure to the care of children. The overall clinical experience at the predoctoral level in orthodontic procedures declined, which resulted in a change in clinical requirements and new methods to ensure clinical competency.
PubMed ID
18096880 View in PubMed
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Competencies for the beginning dental practitioner in Canada: a validity survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167182
Source
J Dent Educ. 2006 Oct;70(10):1076-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Jack D Gerrow
H Joseph Murphy
Marcia A Boyd
Author Affiliation
National Dental Examining Board of Canada, 100 Bronson Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 6G8. jackg@ndeb.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 2006 Oct;70(10):1076-80
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Dentists - standards
Education, Dental - standards
Faculty, Dental
Female
General Practice, Dental - education - standards
Humans
Licensure, Dental
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Time Factors
Abstract
As part of the recommended review of the national competencies for beginning general dentists in Canada, a validation survey was distributed to 731 dentists. The survey asked participants to supply demographic information and rate each of the forty-six competencies on a 5-point Likert scale. The response rate was 43.1 percent (315 total usable responses). Self-reported demographic data was used to create respondent subgroups. The participants rated all of the competencies quite high with thirty-six of the forty-six receiving rankings averaging 4.0 or higher on the 5-point scale. No competency received a ranking averaging lower than 3.0. Competencies rated as most important by the entire sample were also rated as most important by all respondent subgroups. The results of this validation survey provide evidence of content validity and reinforce the value of a national competency document that can serve as a reference for curriculum management, program accreditation, and development of certification examinations.
PubMed ID
17021287 View in PubMed
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A cost-minimization analysis of root canal treatment before and after education in nickel-titanium rotary technique in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127110
Source
Int Endod J. 2012 Jul;45(7):633-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
M. Koch
A. Tegelberg
I. Eckerlund
S. Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontics, Public Dental Service, Sörmland County Council, Sweden. margaretha.koch@dll.se
Source
Int Endod J. 2012 Jul;45(7):633-41
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Dental Alloys - economics
Dentist's Practice Patterns - economics
Endodontics - economics - education
General Practice, Dental - education
Health Care Costs
Humans
Nickel
Public Health Dentistry - economics
Questionnaires
Root Canal Preparation - instrumentation
Root Canal Therapy - economics
Stainless Steel
Sweden
Titanium
Abstract
To compare root canal treatments performed before and after education in a nickel-titanium rotary technique (NiTiR) with respect to costs for instrumentation and number of instrumentation sessions in a County Public Dental Service in Sweden.
Following education, 77% of the general dental practitioners adopted completely the NiTiR. The randomly selected sample comprised 850 root canal treatments: 425 performed after the education, mainly using the NiTiR-technique (group A) and 425 performed before, using mainly stainless steel hand instrumentation (SSI) (group B). The number of instrumentation sessions in root canal treatments in group A and B was calculated. A CMA was undertaken on the assumption that treatment outcome was identical in group A and B. Direct costs associated with SSI and NiTiR were estimated and compared. Investment costs required for implementation of NiTiR were calculated, but not included in the CMA.
Instrumentation sessions were counted in 418 (98%) root canal treatments performed in group A and 419 (99%) in group B. The number of instrumentation sessions in group A was significantly lower; 2.38, compared with 2.82 in group B (P
PubMed ID
22324460 View in PubMed
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Heavy consumption of dental services among Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135490
Source
Community Dent Health. 2010 Dec;27(4):227-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
A. Nihtilä
E. Widström
O. Elonheimo
Author Affiliation
Espoo City Social and Health Services and Network of Academic Health Centres, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Finland. annamari.nihtila@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Health. 2010 Dec;27(4):227-32
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Clinical Competence
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prosthesis - statistics & numerical data
Education, Dental, Continuing
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene - education
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Root Canal Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare treatment of heavy and low users of dental services among adults in the Public Dental Service (PDS) in one of the biggest cities in Finland and to identify reasons for heavy use and to suggest improvements to care provision.
All adults who attended the PDS in Espoo (pop. 227,500) in 2004 were allocated to a group (n = 3,173) who had made six or more dental visits and a comparison group (n = 22,820) who had three or fewer dental visits. The data were obtained from the patient register of the PDS. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Information on age, gender, number and types of visits, oral health status, treatment provided and fees paid was collected from treatment records.
10.5% of the adults were found to be heavy users and their treatment made up 31.6% of all adult dental visits. The proportion of men was greater among heavy users and the heavy users were on average 6.6 years older than the low users. The mean total treatment time for heavy users was 5.5 hours and 2.0 hours for low users. Heavy users had more untreated and treated caries and more periodontal pockets than low users. Restorative, endodontic and prosthetic treatment needs characterised the heavy user group, while the low users most often received restorative and periodontal treatment only.
Our study indicates that complicated treatment needs of heavy users and lack of experience among the caregivers in dealing with them resulted in high numbers of dental visits for individual patients. The PDS should offer appropriate continuing education for its oral health care teams and organize a referral system offering specialist care for difficult endodontic, periodontal and prosthetic treatments.
PubMed ID
21473358 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Dent Educ. 1998 Apr;62(4):307-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
L F Greenwood
D W Lewis
R C Burgess
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
J Dent Educ. 1998 Apr;62(4):307-13
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anesthesia, Dental
Anesthesia, Local
Biopsy
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Scaling
Diagnosis, Oral
Education, Dental
Facial Pain - therapy
Female
Financial Management
Focus Groups
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Male
Ontario
Patient Care Planning
Personnel Management
Physical Examination
Practice Management, Dental
Self Concept
Abstract
As part of a review of the undergraduate curriculum to assess its relevance for a future general practitioner, a survey of self-perceived competency at graduation based on the competency list developed by the Association of Canadian Faculties of Dentistry was circulated to recent graduates and the graduating class. The overall response was 67.5 percent, and revealed that approximately 70 percent of the respondents felt well prepared in approximately 69 percent of the competencies. These were the common "bread and butter" items of dentistry, such as basic restorative dentistry, examination, diagnosis, treatment planning, local anaesthesia, and scaling. Those areas reported as less well-prepared for included financial and personnel management, performance of soft-tissue biopsies, and management of chronic orofacial pain. Clarification of the raw survey results in focus groups was needed to uncover specific details that could lead to remedial action in problem areas.
PubMed ID
9603445 View in PubMed
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The impact of a continuing education programme on the adoption of nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation and root-filling quality amongst a group of Swedish general dental practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278855
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Feb;19(1):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
L. Dahlström
A. Molander
C. Reit
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2015 Feb;19(1):23-30
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Instruments
Education, Dental, Continuing
Endodontics - education
Female
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Male
Nickel
Practice Patterns, Dentists' - statistics & numerical data
Public Health Dentistry - education
Radiography, Dental
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Titanium
Abstract
The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that a further education programme relating to nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation (NTRI), with the concurrent activation of social/professional networks amongst all general dental practitioners (GDPs) in a public dental service in Sweden, would increase the adoption rate and improve root-filling quality.
To activate the networks, the GDPs at the 25 clinics elected training coaches from amongst themselves. The coaches were educated by a specialist and were then free to organise and conduct the training of the local GDPs. However, collective hands-on training and discussions were mandatory. Lectures were held by an endodontist. The rate of adoption and root-filling quality was evaluated just before and 6 months after the education. Statistical tests were performed with chi-square using a 95% confidence interval.
Nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation was adopted by 88%. Excellent root fillings (score 1) increased from 45% to 59% (P = 0.003). The rate of poor-quality root fillings (score 4 and score 5) was not affected. The quality ratio (score 1/score 5) increased from 5.36 (118/22) to 9.5 (133/14). Eleven dentists (17%) at nine different clinics produced 49% of the poor-quality root fillings (score 4 and score 5). Seventy-three per cent of these dentists stated that they had adopted NTRI.
The introduction of NTRI will increase the adoption rate and the frequency of good-quality root fillings. However, it will not overcome the problems associated with dentists producing a low-quality level, even if a local professional network is activated.
PubMed ID
24646133 View in PubMed
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Increasing general dentists' provision of care to child patients through changes in the undergraduate pediatric dentistry program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175880
Source
J Dent Educ. 2005 Mar;69(3):371-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Predrag-Charles Lekic
Natalie Sanche
Olva Odlum
Johann deVries
William A Wiltshire
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, 780 Bannatyne Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3E OW2. lekicpc@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 2005 Mar;69(3):371-7
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Competency-Based Education
Dental Care for Children
Education, Dental - methods
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Manitoba
Patient Selection
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Reduced caries rates and an increased percentage of children with dental insurance have made it more difficult for dental schools to provide undergraduates with sufficient numbers of pediatric dental patients requiring restorative procedures. This may result in graduates who are not competent and are reluctant to treat children after graduation. To ensure the quality of the undergraduate clinical training program, the Division of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Manitoba changed from a comprehensive-based clinic to a block system in 1998-99. Specific communities with limited access to dental care (neighboring core area schools and Hutterite colonies) were specifically targeted as potential sources for child patients. This format increased the exposure of students to patient management as well as to complex pediatric dentistry procedures. To assess the learning experiences before and after the changes to the clinical pediatric dentistry program, sixty general dentists who had graduated from the University of Manitoba were randomly selected using the Manitoba Dental Association Directory. Surveys were sent to twenty general dentists who graduated in each of the following years: 1993, 2000, and 2002. Forty-five dentists responded, fifteen from each of the three surveyed classes. Dentists who graduated after the changes to the program (2000, 2002) reported that they performed a greater number of complex pediatric dentistry procedures and treated more toddler and preschool children than the group that graduated before the changes (1993). Referrals to pediatric dentistry specialists were higher in the 1993 group than in the 2000 and 2002 groups. In conclusion, an adequate pool of pediatric patients is critical to provide dental students with sufficient learning experiences. The dentists who graduated from the program after the changes were implemented are providing more comprehensive treatment to younger children.
PubMed ID
15749948 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.