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498 records – page 1 of 50.

Source
Tidskr Sjukvardspedagog. 1980;27(2):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
L. Starck
Source
Tidskr Sjukvardspedagog. 1980;27(2):3
Date
1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Occupations
Sweden
Women
PubMed ID
6902570 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Danish Nursing Council's sex discrimination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52894
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Jan 17;90(3):18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1990
Author
I. Minnasdatter
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Jan 17;90(3):18
Date
Jan-17-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Prejudice
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
2315863 View in PubMed
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Source
AARN News Lett. 1992 Jun;48(6):33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
H. Gemmill
Source
AARN News Lett. 1992 Jun;48(6):33
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Politics
Women
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
1636369 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 30;114(26):3050-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1994
Author
G C Alfsen
C. Haug
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 30;114(26):3050-1
Date
Oct-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Norway
Physicians, Women
Workload
PubMed ID
7974421 View in PubMed
Less detail

[1986 SHSTF Congress. Unequal sex distribution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52927
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986
Author
D. Snäckerström
M. Lindberg
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Date
Nov-27-1986
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Prejudice
Societies
Sweden
PubMed ID
3649140 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Nov 15;8(20):52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1984
Author
K. Johnson
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Nov 15;8(20):52
Date
Nov-15-1984
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Health Occupations
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Societies
Sweden
PubMed ID
6571102 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The abused wife in a sexist society].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239244
Source
Infirm Can. 1985 Feb;27(2):22-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Source
Infirm Can. 1985 Feb;27(2):22-3
Date
Feb-1985
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Gender Identity
Humans
Prejudice
Social Environment
Social Perception
Spouse Abuse
PubMed ID
3843980 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Men or women crucial for whom has power in health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52849
Source
Vardfacket. 1993 Apr 30;17(8):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1993
Author
S. Stubbendorff
Source
Vardfacket. 1993 Apr 30;17(8):3
Date
Apr-30-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Sweden
PubMed ID
8109154 View in PubMed
Less detail

Women as family caregivers: why do they care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222989
Source
Gerontologist. 1992 Oct;32(5):607-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
N. Guberman
P. Maheu
C. Maillé
Author Affiliation
University of Quebec, Department of Social Work, Montreal.
Source
Gerontologist. 1992 Oct;32(5):607-17
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - psychology
Decision Making
Family
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Motivation
Quebec
Women - psychology
Abstract
This study was based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 40 francophone Québécois family caregivers of frail elderly or mentally ill relatives and focused on the caregiving relation rather than on the specificities of aging and mental illness. Fourteen factors (love, guilt and duty, women's social identity built around caring, absence of appropriate public or private care alternatives, women's socioeconomic dependence, etc.) emerged from an analysis of informants' accounts of how they came to be the primary caregiver. Data indicate that analyses attempting to understand women's caregiving must take into account the sexual division of labor, its reinforcement through social policy, and how women internalize ideas and norms regarding appropriate gender-role behavior.
PubMed ID
1427272 View in PubMed
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Historical and social context for birth planning in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52912
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1988;9(3):185-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J M Swanson
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1988;9(3):185-99
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Educational Status
Family Planning Services - trends
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Iceland
Life Style
Abstract
Iceland is a rugged subarctic island 600 miles from Norway and 500 miles from Scotland. From the mid-14th to the end of the 18th century the island was virtually isolated. Isolation and sociocultural factors interacted to delay the fertility transition in Iceland until late in the 20th century. In 1983 Iceland had the highest crude birth rate of any developed country -- 18.4/1000. Between 1890-1982, the population almost tripled, to 235,501 inhabitants. The total fertility rate is 2.2, down from 4.17 in 1960. Combined with a high birth rate was a low mortality rate of 7.0/1000 of the population and a life expectancy of 79.5 years for women and 73.9 years for men -- the highest in the world. Infant mortality is only 6.2/1000 live births. This combination of high fertility, low mortality, and low emigration caused the high population growth. By the end of the 18th century, Iceland had achieved near universal literacy, and education through university is free, but not until 1960 did a woman receive a doctorate from the University of Iceland. By 198, 2/3 of women in Iceland participated in the labor force, but their earnings were only 2/3 those of men. In 1983 a Women's Party was formed, and women now hold 15% of the seats in the Althing (Parliament). Marriage rates have declined to 5.22/1000 of the population. The unique marital pattern of Iceland contributes to the high (41%) illegitimacy rate. Icelandic couples cohabit and have a child or 2 before they marry. They therefore tend to marry late (25.5 for men, 23.3 for women). Health care, including family planning services, is free in Iceland; and there is a medical school, a school of pharmacy, and 2 nursing schools. 35% of Icelandic women 20-40 years of age use either the pill or the IUD. Over-the-counter contraceptives are also available, and an average of 358 women are sterilized each year. The abortion rate is only 10.6/1000 females 15-49 years of age. The Birth Control Act of 1975 calls for the provision of sex education and counseling, including contraception, sterilization and abortion. Nurses can assist in family planning program by observing needs, offering birth planning for couples, and carrying out research in the factors that affect family planning in Iceland.
PubMed ID
3417575 View in PubMed
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498 records – page 1 of 50.