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[1986 SHSTF Congress. Unequal sex distribution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52927
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986
Author
D. Snäckerström
M. Lindberg
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Date
Nov-27-1986
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Prejudice
Societies
Sweden
PubMed ID
3649140 View in PubMed
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The 2015 National Canadian Homeless Youth Survey: Mental Health and Addiction Findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291013
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Sean A Kidd
Stephen Gaetz
Bill O'Grady
Author Affiliation
1 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Youth - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sexual and Gender Minorities - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was designed to provide a representative description of the mental health of youth accessing homelessness services in Canada. It is the most extensive survey in this area to date and is intended to inform the development of mental health and addiction service and policy for this marginalized population.
This study reports mental health-related data from the 2015 "Leaving Home" national youth homelessness survey, which was administered through 57 agencies serving homeless youth in 42 communities across the country. This self-reported, point-in-time survey assessed a broad range of demographic information, pre-homelessness and homelessness variables, and mental health indicators.
Survey data were obtained from 1103 youth accessing Canadian homelessness services in the Nunavut territory and all Canadian provinces except for Prince Edward Island. Forty-two per cent of participants reported 1 or more suicide attempts, 85.4% fell in a high range of psychological distress, and key indicators of risk included an earlier age of the first episode of homelessness, female gender, and identifying as a sexual and/or gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and 2 spirit [LGBTQ2S]).
This study provides clear and compelling evidence of a need for mental health support for these youth, particularly LGBTQ2S youth and female youth. The mental health concerns observed here, however, must be considered in the light of the tremendous adversity in all social determinants faced by these youth, with population-level interventions best leveraged in prevention and rapid response.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Aug 29;352(9129):743 PMID 9729028
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 2012 May;41(5):533-43 PMID 22302217
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Aug;57(3):561-9 PMID 12791497
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;60(11):467-74 PMID 26720504
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 4;292(5):569-74 PMID 15292082
Cites: Am J Addict. 2006;15 Suppl 1:80-91 PMID 17182423
Cites: J Adolesc. 2011 Oct;34(5):1049-54 PMID 21122909
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2004 Mar;13(2):299-310 PMID 15085902
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Dec;45(6):571-8 PMID 19931829
Cites: J Adolesc. 2007 Apr;30(2):283-96 PMID 16631925
Cites: J Couns Psychol. 2010 Jul;57(3):274-89 PMID 21133579
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;46(7):617-21 PMID 11582822
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Oct 1;67(10 ):1083-1090 PMID 27247178
Cites: J Nurs Meas. 2009;17(2):105-13 PMID 19711709
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 May;92(5):773-7 PMID 11988446
PubMed ID
28372467 View in PubMed
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Abortion in Canada: religious and ideological dimensions of women's attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227544
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Author
V. Krishnan
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Marriage
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
This paper examines a number of demographic and sociocultural factors (e.g., age, marital status, family size, religion, religious assiduity, sex-role ideology) as predictors of women's attitudes toward abortion, using data from the Canadian Fertility Survey of 1984. The findings suggest that women's abortion attitudes are to a greater extent based on ideological positions. It appears that anti-abortion stance affects those women who are religious, presumably by increasing the relationship between their general sex-role ideological stances and abortion attitudes. Abortion attitudes also vary according to a woman's education, her size, and province/region of residence.
PubMed ID
1801205 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and mental disorder in the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2301
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
Seltzer, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Arctic Bay
Hysterical dissociation disorder
Paranoid personality disorder
Resolute Bay
Stress, mental
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anomie
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Role
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The phenomenon of acculturation stress is described with particular reference to the subsequent development of the transitional role conflict. The adolescent and young adult male Eskimo is especially susceptible to the anxiety generated by the process of acculturation and it is the interaction of this external stress with the bio-psychosocial characteristics of the individual within his ecological group, that may lead to an increased incidence of mental disorder. The clinical picture that develops will depend on the complex interaction of this psychosocial stressor and the level of ego development and its accompanying defence and coping strategies. We see how the development of manifest psychopathology in two young Inuit males was intimately associated with the stresses of acculturation acting upon personalities characterized by a low self-esteem and negative self-image, feelings of emasculation and a state of anomie. Coping and defensive strategies exhibited both similarities (drugs, alcohol, withdrawal, actin out) and differences (psychosis versus dissociation). The value of modified supportive therapy with continuity of care aimed at increasing self-esteem through sublimation, identification, reduction of dependency and encouragement of growth and autonomy is described, as are measures aimed at primary prevention.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2319.
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Activity during unemployment and mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52737
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Sep;37(3):269-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
K. Underlid
Author Affiliation
Bergen College of Advanced Education, Norway.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Sep;37(3):269-81
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Unemployment - psychology
Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to investigate activity during unemployment and the relationship between such activity and mental health in a sample (n = 213) of unemployed Norwegians. The results indicate that the unemployed are generally more passive than the average population, and that they are considerably less involved in social activities. However, the unemployed do not constitute a homogeneous group in terms of activity level and activity profile. Women were somewhat more active that men, particularly in connection with domestic chores. Young people were more active than the other age groups, particularly in connection with extra-familial activities. Several significant relationships were found between different activity categories and mental health. The more active the unemployed were, the better their mental health. The results are discussed in relation to similar data for the average population, other unemployment research, subjective and objective factors which can be of importance to the activity level and profile of the unemployed, sex role issues, theoretical models developed to explain and understand the effects of unemployment, methodological considerations, and the possible functions of activity for mental health.
PubMed ID
8856999 View in PubMed
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Adjusting to being a father to an infant born prematurely: experiences from Swedish fathers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86951
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Lindberg Birgitta
Axelsson Karin
Ohrling Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. birgitta.lindberg@ltu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2008 Mar;22(1):79-85
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Gender Identity
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Intensive Care, Neonatal - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Narration
Neonatal Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of being a father to a prematurely born infant. Eight fathers of prematurely born children were interviewed using a narrative approach, and a thematic content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The fathers described that the preterm birth gave them the chance to get to know their infant as they had to spend time at the intensive care unit. They also felt better educated by professionals who helped them take care of their infant. Their feelings and attachment for their infant increased over time and the fathers felt that they had a stronger bond with their child compared with friends who had babies born at term. As time passed, they became more confident as a father. In spite of the strain, the experience made them change as a person and they expressed having different values. The relationship with their partner was strengthened as they handled this situation together as a couple. However, the fathers felt fortunate despite everything and described having managed a prematurely born infant rather well. Although there are similarities between being a father to a child born at term and to one born preterm, it is significant to gain further knowledge about the specific experiences of fathers of prematurely born infants. The results of this study have implications for nurses working with families who have children born prematurely.
PubMed ID
18269426 View in PubMed
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Adolescent females between tradition and modernity: gender role socialization in South Asian immigrant culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196678
Source
J Adolesc. 2000 Oct;23(5):615-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
A. Talbani
P. Hasanali
Author Affiliation
Department of Leadership, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA. atalbani@memphis.edu
Source
J Adolesc. 2000 Oct;23(5):615-27
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Asia, Southeastern - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Quebec
Social Identification
Socialization
Abstract
The study examines the social and cultural experiences of adolescent female belonging to various south Asian immigrant groups in Canada. Applying qualitative research method, the authors interviewed 22 adolescent girls of Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi origin in Montreal. Like other immigrant communities, south Asian families undergo acculturation stress. South Asians tend to integrate secular European cultural elements with their culture; however, family and community structure remain male dominated. The study showed that gender roles were maintained through gender segregation, control over social activities of girls and arranged marriage. Interviewees felt that their parents and communities have more stringent rules for female socialization than any other community in Canada. The study also found that adolescent girls perceived high social cost attached to protest and dissent, therefore, they accept prevalent conditions and expect to change social situation gradually. Some adolescents undergo stress resulting in behavioral problems.
PubMed ID
11073702 View in PubMed
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Adolescent identity formation: a Swedish study of identity status using the EOM-EIS-II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173249
Source
Adolescence. 2005;40(158):377-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Susanne Bergh
Ann Erling
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
Adolescence. 2005;40(158):377-96
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Psychological Tests - standards
Schools
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Social Identification
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine ego identity status among Swedish adolescents using the EOM-EIS-II. Identity status scores and distributions were examined for 222 (108 female, 114 male) Swedish high school students. Identity status differences were found between genders. There was a greater likelihood of female adolescents being categorized as moratoriums than were males, and there was a greater likelihood of males being categorized as diffusions than were females. Statistically significant differences were found between genders on the following subscales: moratorium, foreclosure, and diffusion. No statistically significant differences were found between females and males on the identity achievement subscale. To achieve a preliminary construct validation of the results from the EOM-EIS-II, four of the 222 participants were also assessed using Marcia's identity status interview. A fairly good accordance between the interview assessment of identity status and the EOM-EIS-II assessment were found. Interview results showed differences between the interviewers on each subscale (IA, M, F, and D). The same differences were detected on three of four subscales when assessing these individuals' identity statuses using the EOM-EIS-II.
PubMed ID
16114599 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents' opposite-sex ideal in four countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34699
Source
J Soc Psychol. 1996 Aug;136(4):531-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J L Gibbons
R R Richter
D C Wiley
D A Stiles
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology Saint Louis University, MO 63103, USA.
Source
J Soc Psychol. 1996 Aug;136(4):531-7
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Choice Behavior
Comparative Study
Courtship
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Gender Identity
Guatemala
Humans
Iceland
Male
Mexico
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Values
United States
Abstract
Six hundred young adolescents (11 to 16 years old) from 4 countries (Guatemala, Iceland, Mexico, and the United States) ranked the importance of 10 qualities of the opposite-sex ideal person. Those from the United States responded in an individualistic fashion; they ranked being fun, being sexy, and having considerable money as important for the ideal. Those from Guatemala responded in a collectivistic fashion; they ranked liking children as important, but being fun and good looking as unimportant. Adolescents from Mexico and Iceland reported patterns of values not clearly associated with either collectivism or individualism.
PubMed ID
8855383 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' prospective screen time by gender and parental education, the mediation of parental influences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112462
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Mona Bjelland
Nanna Lien
Ingunn H Bergh
Mekdes K Gebremariam
May Grydeland
Yngvar Ommundsen
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway. t.h.totland@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:89
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Child
Child Behavior
Computers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Fathers
Female
Gender Identity
Health Behavior
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Sex Factors
Television
Video Games
Abstract
The present study investigated associations in gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' time spent on television and video viewing (TV/DVD), and computer and electronic game use (PC/games) at the ages of 11 and 13 years. Possible mediating effects of parental modelling and parental regulation in the relationship between parental education and adolescents' prospective TV/DVD and PC/game time were further examined.
A total of 908 adolescents, participating at both ages 11 and 13 years in the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study (2007-2009), were included in the analyses. Data on adolescents', mothers' and fathers' self reported time spent on TV/DVD and PC/games were measured at both time points by questionnaires. Correlation coefficients were used to examine gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' reports. Mediation analyses using linear regression investigated possible mediation effects of parental modelling and parental regulation in the prospective relationship between parental education and adolescents' time spent on TV/DVD and PC/games between the ages of 11 and 13 years.
Correlations of screen time behaviours in gender dyads of parents and adolescents showed significant associations in time spent on TV/DVD at the age of 11 and 13 years. Associations between mothers and sons and between fathers and daughters were also observed in time spent on PC/games at the age of 11 years. Maternal and paternal modelling was further found to mediate the relationship between parental education and adolescents' prospective TV/DVD time between the ages of 11 and 13 years. No mediation effect was observed for parental regulation, however a decrease in both maternal and paternal regulation at the age of 11 years significantly predicted more TV/DVD time among adolescents at the age of 13 years.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships were observed in gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' screen time behaviours at the ages of 11 and 13 years, and further studies including both parents and their children should be emphasized. Moreover, maternal and paternal modelling were found to be important target variables in interventions aiming to reduce social differences by parental education in adolescents' prospective time spent on TV/DVD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23829607 View in PubMed
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523 records – page 1 of 53.