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Alcohol drinking, social class and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11116
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
H. Møller
H. Tønnesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Research in Health and Social Statistics, Danish National Research Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1997;(138):251-63
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Brazil - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
New Zealand - epidemiology
Population
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Abstract
This chapter reviews the data on occurrence of cancers that are potentially caused by alcohol drinking (cancers of the upper gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and liver cancer) in relation to social class. In order to assess the role of alcohol drinking in the observed social class gradients of these cancers, we have particularly looked for consistency in the gradients of different alcohol-related cancers, and used lung cancer occurrence to judge the role of tobacco smoking, which is the major other determinant of these diseases. Additional data on levels of alcohol drinking and on the occurrence of other alcohol-related morbidity are brought into the discussion where available. A role of alcohol drinking in the observed negative social class gradients for alcohol-related cancers is very likely in men in France, Italy and New Zealand. Evidence that is less strong, but is suggestive of a role of alcohol drinking, is seen for men in Brazil, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Denmark. Although a role of alcohol drinking is likely or possible in certain populations, other factors may contribute as well, most notably tobacco smoking and dietary habits. Additional data on the frequency of complications after surgical procedures in alcohol drinkers are reviewed briefly.
PubMed ID
9353668 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and cancer of the upper digestive tract. Treating upper digestive tract cancers as a single entity may be misleading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10676
Source
BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1291
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1999
Author
R. Fitzgerald
C. Caygill
Source
BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1291
Date
May-8-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Barrett Esophagus - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Notes
Comment On: BMJ. 1998 Sep 26;317(7162):844-79748175
PubMed ID
10391708 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the prevalence of hereditary adenomatosis of the gastrointestinal tract among the population of Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240588
Source
Genetika. 1984 May;20(5):857-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
G G Tatishvili
A M Nikitin
B A Al'tshuler
Source
Genetika. 1984 May;20(5):857-63
Date
May-1984
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Epidemiologic Methods
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Moscow
Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Urban Population
Abstract
The prevalence of hereditary autosomal dominant gastrointestinal adenomatosis in the Moscow population was estimated on the basis of elaboration of an indirect method. This estimate was found to be 1:48000. The prevalence observed is discussed in terms of ascertainment problems and peculiarities of the method of calculation proposed.
PubMed ID
6145659 View in PubMed
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Annual hospital volume of surgery for gastrointestinal cancer in relation to prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310634
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2019 Oct; 45(10):1839-1846
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Eivind Gottlieb-Vedi
Fredrik Mattsson
Pernilla Lagergren
Jesper Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine & Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: eivind.gottlieb.vedi@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2019 Oct; 45(10):1839-1846
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Hospitals, High-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Studies examining hospital volume for surgery for various gastrointestinal (GI) cancer types have shown conflicting results regarding the influence on long-term prognosis. The aim of this study was to examine annual hospital volume in relation to long-term survival after elective surgery for all GI cancers (esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, bile ducts, small bowel, colon, and rectum).
Population-based cohort study including all 45,908 patients who underwent elective surgery for GI cancers in Sweden in 2005-2013. Follow-up was until 2016 for disease-specific 5-year mortality (main outcome) and 2018 for all-cause 5-year mortality (secondary outcome). Hospitals were divided into quartiles for each GI cancer according to a 4-year average annual volume of the year of surgery and three years earlier. Multivariable Cox regression provided hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for relevant confounders.
Higher hospital volume was associated with a survival benefit in the large group of patients (n?=?26,688) who underwent colon cancer resection, with HR 0.89 (95% CI 0.84-0.96) for disease-specific 5-year mortality comparing the highest with the lowest quartile. Higher hospital volume improved 5-year mortality in sub-groups of patients who underwent surgery for cancer of the esophagus, pancreas, and rectum. No such improvements were found for cancer of the stomach, liver, bile ducts, or small bowel.
Long-term survival was improved at higher volume hospitals for some GI cancers (colon, esophagus, pancreas, rectum), but not for others (stomach, liver, bile ducts, small bowel).
PubMed ID
30904243 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer as a risk factor for other primary malignant diseases. A nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26707
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1984 Nov;73(5):1049-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1984
Author
H O Adami
L. Bergkvist
U. Krusemo
I. Persson
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1984 Nov;73(5):1049-55
Date
Nov-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort comprising 11,452 women and based on virtually all cases of first incidence of breast cancer in Sweden in 1964-67 was followed for 13-16 completed years--corresponding to 94,078 person-years of observation--for the occurrence of subsequent primary tumors other than in the breast. A slight excess in the total number of second malignant diseases (695 observed vs. 633.7 expected; relative risk (RR) = 1.10) was possibly partly due to a higher autopsy rate with more frequent detection of preclinical cancers in the cohort than in the background population. A significant risk increase was confirmed for endometrial cancer after the age of 70 years (RR = 2.4; 95% confidence limits = 1.6-3.5) but not for ovarian cancer (RR = 1.2) or tumors of the large bowel (RR = 1.2), rectum (RR = 1.1), or any other site. It was concluded that: 1) so many subgroups were analyzed in this study that the significant association with endometrial cancer might be due to the play of chance alone and, therefore, needs further confirmation, 2) there is no common genetically linked susceptibility to primary cancer of the breast and that of other sites, 3) the hypothesis that cancers of the breast and large bowel share major etiologic factors was not supported, and 4) it is unlikely that secondary cancers significantly contribute to the late excess mortality in breast cancer patients.
PubMed ID
6593483 View in PubMed
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Cancer after repair of esophageal atresia: population-based long-term follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157776
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2008 Apr;43(4):602-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Saara J Sistonen
Antti Koivusalo
Harry Lindahl
Eero Pukkala
Risto J Rintala
Mikko P Pakarinen
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, PO Box 281, FI-00029-HUS, Helsinki, Finland. saara.sistonen@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2008 Apr;43(4):602-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Esophageal Atresia - epidemiology - surgery
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Leukemia - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Period
Registries
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Esophageal atresia (EA) predisposes to gastroesophageal reflux that is associated with intestinal metaplasia and may result in development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. To date, the literature has reported 5 cases of esophageal cancer in adult patients treated for EA. The aim of this study was to find out the incidence of esophageal cancer in adult patients with repaired EA.
Five hundred two consecutive patients treated for EA from 1949 to 1978 were followed-up for cancer through the files of the population-based countrywide cancer registry from 1967 to 2004. The number of cancer cases observed and person-years at risk were counted, and the expected number of cancer cases estimated from the national cancer incidence rates. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated by dividing the number of cancer cases observed by the expected numbers.
None of the 502 patients were lost to follow-up; 230 patients who died before 1967 younger than the median age of 8 days were excluded from further analysis. The 272 remaining patients (142 males) were eligible for follow-up (median age, 35 years; range, 2 days to 56 years). Three cases of cancer were found (SIR, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-2.8). One was lymphoma in small intestine, 1 was leukemia, and 1 carcinoma of the uterus but no cases of esophageal cancer.
Our study is able to exclude long-term risk for esophageal cancer after repair of EA 500-fold higher than that of the normal population. Considering the relatively young age of the survivors, further studies and continued follow-up are warranted to elucidate risk for esophageal cancer and need for endoscopic surveillance after repair of EA.
PubMed ID
18405703 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality of granite workers 1940-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103645
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1990;(97):43-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
R S Koskela
M. Klockars
E. Järvinen
A. Rossi
P J Kolari
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1990;(97):43-53
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dust - adverse effects
Finland
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupations
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Silicon Dioxide
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to investigate the cancer mortality of granite workers. The study comprised 1026 workers who took up such work between 1940 and 1971. The number of person-years was 23,434, and the number of deaths was 296. During the total follow-up period, 59 tumours were observed as compared with 54.4 expected. An excess mortality from tumours was observed in workers followed up for 20 years or more. Of the 59 tumours, 31 were lung cancers (expected 19.9), and 18 gastrointestinal cancers (expected 11.6), nine of which were stomach cancers (expected 7.1). Mortality from lung cancer was excessive for workers followed up for at least 15 years (28 observed, 12.7 expected). The results indicate that granite exposure per se may be an etiological factor in the initiation or promotion of malignant neoplasms.
PubMed ID
2164502 View in PubMed
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72 records – page 1 of 8.