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Alcohol and substance abuse, depression and suicide attempts after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281902
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
O. Backman
D. Stockeld
F. Rasmussen
E. Näslund
R. Marsk
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Small studies suggest that subjects who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of suicide, alcohol and substance use disorders. This population-based cohort study aimed to assess the incidence of treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and attempted suicide after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
All patients who underwent primary RYGB in Sweden between 2001 and 2010 were included. Incidence of hospital admission for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and suicide attempt was measured, along with the number of drugs prescribed. This cohort was compared with a large age-matched, non-obese reference cohort based on the Swedish population. Inpatient care and prescribed drugs registers were used.
Before RYGB surgery, women, but not men, were at higher risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use disorder compared with the reference cohort. After surgery, this was the case for both sexes. The risk of being diagnosed and treated for depression remained raised after surgery. Suicide attempts were significantly increased after RYGB. The adjusted hazard ratio for attempted suicide in the RYGB cohort after surgery compared with the general non-obese population was 2·85 (95 per cent c.i. 2·40 to 3·39).
Patients who have undergone RYGB are at an increased risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use, with an increased rate of attempted suicide compared with a non-obese general population cohort.
PubMed ID
27467694 View in PubMed
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Changes in BMI and psychosocial functioning in partners of women who undergo gastric bypass surgery for obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267081
Source
Obes Surg. 2015 Feb;25(2):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Mikaela Willmer
Daniel Berglind
Anders Thorell
Magnus Sundbom
Joanna Uddén
Mustafa Raoof
Jakob Hedberg
Per Tynelius
Ata Ghaderi
Erik Näslund
Finn Rasmussen
Source
Obes Surg. 2015 Feb;25(2):319-24
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - psychology - surgery
Overweight - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sleep - physiology
Spouses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
There is very little research exploring the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on the patient's partner. The aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinally whether male partners of female RYGB patients were affected in terms of BMI, sleep quality, body dissatisfaction, depression, and anxiety.
Thirty-seven women, with partners who were willing to participate, were recruited from RYGB waiting lists at five Swedish hospitals. Data collection took place during two home visits, 3 months before and 9 months after RYGB surgery. Anthropometrical data were documented, and both women and men completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ). The men also completed the Male Body Dissatisfaction Scale (MBDS).
The men's BMI changes between the two time points that were analysed using general estimating equation (GEE) regression. Their BMI decreased significantly (ß?=?-0.9, p?=?0.004). The change was more pronounced in the 26 men who had a baseline BMI of =25 (ß?=?-1.4, p?
PubMed ID
25148886 View in PubMed
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Improved Well-Being After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281007
Source
Am J Nurs. 2016 May;116(5):62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Karen Rosenberg
Source
Am J Nurs. 2016 May;116(5):62
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Humans
Male
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
According to this study.
PubMed ID
27123636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Suicide, self-harm, and depression after gastric bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283633
Source
Ann Surg. 2017 Feb;265(2):235-243
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Ylva Trolle Lagerros
Lena Brandt
Jakob Hedberg
Magnus Sundbom
Robert Bodén
Source
Ann Surg. 2017 Feb;265(2):235-243
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - etiology
Female
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - etiology - psychology
Preoperative Period
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology
Suicide
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine risk of self-harm, hospitalization for depression and death by suicide after gastric bypass surgery (GBP).
Concerns regarding severe adverse psychiatric outcomes after GBP have been raised.
This nationwide, longitudinal, self-matched cohort encompassed 22,539 patients who underwent GBP during 2008 to 2012. They were identified through the Swedish National Patient Register, the Prescribed Drug Register, and the Causes of Death Register. Follow-up time was up to 2 years. Main outcome measures were hazard ratios (HRs) for post-surgery self-harm or hospitalization for depression in patients with presurgery self-harm and/or depression compared to patients without this exposure; and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for suicide post-surgery.
A diagnosis of self-harm in the 2 years preceding surgery was associated with an HR of 36.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.5-52.4) for self-harm during the 2 years of follow up, compared to GBP patients who had no self-harm diagnosis before surgery. Patients with a diagnosis of depression preceding GBP surgery had an HR of 52.3 (95% CI 30.6-89.2) for hospitalization owing to depression after GBP, compared to GBP patients without a previous diagnosis of depression. The SMR for suicide after GBP was increased among females (n = 13), 4.50 (95% CI 2.50-7.50). The SMR among males (n = 4), was 1.71 (95% CI 0.54-4.12).
The increased risk of post-surgery self-harm and hospitalization for depression is mainly attributable to patients who have a diagnosis of self-harm or depression before surgery. Raised awareness is needed to identify vulnerable patients with history of self-harm or depression, which may be in need of psychiatric support after GBP.
PubMed ID
27387654 View in PubMed
Less detail