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Antibody reactivities to glutamate-rich peptides of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in humans from areas of different malaria endemicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34615
Source
APMIS. 1996 Oct;104(10):734-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
P H Jakobsen
T G Theander
L. Hviid
S. Morris-Jones
J B Jensen
R A Bayoumi
B M Greenwood
I C Bygbjerg
P M Heegaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 1996 Oct;104(10):734-40
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antibodies, Protozoan - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Antigens, Protozoan
Denmark - epidemiology
Endemic Diseases
Female
Gambia - epidemiology
Glutamates - chemistry - immunology
Humans
Indonesia - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Malaria, Falciparum - epidemiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Plasmodium falciparum - immunology
Protozoan Proteins - chemical synthesis - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sudan - epidemiology
Abstract
Synthetic P. falciparum peptides were evaluated as tools in epidemiological investigations of malaria. Plasma IgM and IgG antibody reactivities against synthetic peptides covering sequences of glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) and acidic-basic repeat antigen (ABRA) were measured by ELISA in individuals from malaria-endemic areas of Sudan, Indonesia and The Gambia to study antibody responses to these peptides in donors living in areas of different malaria endemicity. IgG and IgM reactivities to the peptides increased with malaria endemicity, although there were no differences in reactivities to the GLURP peptide between non-exposed donors and donors living in areas of low malaria endemicity. IgG reactivities to the GLURP peptide in Sudanese adults were high one month after treatment in all adults tested, while IgG reactivities to the ABRA peptide were infrequent. IgM responses to the peptides tested were shortlived in most patients. In Gambian children with malaria, IgM reactivities but not IgG antibody reactivities against the ABRA peptide were higher in those with mild malaria than in those with severe malaria. The peptides may be useful in future epidemiological studies, especially in areas of low malaria endemicity.
PubMed ID
8980624 View in PubMed
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